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Is this resource necessary?  This resource in combination with the use of the picture books will bring visibility to families with two mums or two dads.

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Presentation on theme: "Is this resource necessary?  This resource in combination with the use of the picture books will bring visibility to families with two mums or two dads."— Presentation transcript:

1 Is this resource necessary?  This resource in combination with the use of the picture books will bring visibility to families with two mums or two dads as well as other family types  This resource will help support children who are in family types not represented in mainstream class materials  Positive and consistent messages from junior infants to sixth class will enable all children to embrace and understand the diversity of family types in Ireland.  Use of Socratic questioning, teachable moments and preparation for tricky questions will develop critical thinking skills, tolerance and a knowledge around different families  Use of this resource may stimulate conversations within your school and with colleagues around the importance of teaching about different families How do I use this resource? You can use the picture books as a ‘way in’ and starting point, to discussions and critical thinking around different family types or the books can be used to make different families visible so they are appreciated and accepted in an informal way The key and sensitive themes are listed to inform the teacher as to its suitability for the age or context in which there are teaching. Each resource guide includes some suggested activities and suggestions on how to integrate across the curriculum. Each resource is presented in a spiral approach similar to the SPHE curriculum, with language and concepts developed at a class and age appropriate level Are these picture books suitable for my class? As with any resource, the context of the school will dictate this. These books have been specifically chosen as they may be used to focus on families with two mums or two dads. That said, at the heart of each story is the love, care, and uniqueness that families offer children. Lesbian and gay headed families are a peripheral theme, that if appropriate and suitable, teachers and schools can use them to develop greater knowledge, understanding, and respect for such families. “The Family Book” by Todd Parr “And Tango Makes Three” by Justin Richardson “The Seven Chinese Sisters” by Kathy Tucker “The Different Dragon” by Jennifer Bryan Junior/Senior First/Second Third / Fourth Fifth/ Sixth Picture books are linked to SPHE curricular strands and strand units, each resource guide is colour coded by class bands with objectives identified Suggested questions and activities accompany each resource sheet Sensitive themes clearly identified Some tips and approaches to answering tricky questions provided Different Families Resource Guide Using Picture books to support different families in the Primary school cass Written by Pól de Chnuic and designed by Fiona Ní Mhartín

2 Junior and Senior Infants Different Families Resource “The Family Book” by Todd Parr This resource will help you: teach and talk about different family types discuss the role of families bring visibility to different family types in an informal way Why use this resource sheet and book? Using this book and sheet will stimulate discussion around different family types. It will allow children to develop their own understanding by asking questions and challenging their own concepts and ideas around family types. It can be used to introduce the concept of families with two mums or two dads and show that they behave and act in just the same way as other families, developing a “just like us attitude” in the children. The extension activities and worksheet will integrate and extend your work using the book. Key themes: families come in all different shapes and sizes families do things together all families love one another Sensitive themes: variety of family units depicted including same sex families Subject: S.P.H.E Strand/Strand Unit: Myself and others; Myself and my family Objectives: (Pg. 20 Primary School Curriculum, S.P.H.E) The child should be enabled to identify and name the people who constitute a family and appreciate that all family units are not the same realise that he/she belongs to a family and that each person has a place and a role within the family explore the things that families do together realise how families take care of, support and love each other explore and acknowledge many things that can be learned at home Questions:  Who is in your family?  Name some things your family do for you?  What type of things do your family do for you?  What families are in this story?  What things do they do together?  What things do you do in your family?  What do all families have in common, that make them similar or the same?  What things do you learn at home?  What is your favourite thing to do with your family? Follow up activities Accompanying Activity: Draw your family celebrating a happy occasion. Creative Response: Draw you and your family doing something that you like, something ‘special’ – and make your own class ‘Family Book’. Recall Activity: Have a look at the pictures and see can the children remember the different types of families. Class Discussion: Ask the children to imagine what the different families might do at the weekend Creative Response: Draw your family tree.

3 Think and be ready! Being prepared with responses will help children with tricky questions, extend their understanding and challenge any misconceptions or stereotypes. Being prepared with responses will help children with tricky questions, extend their understanding and challenge any misconceptions or stereotypes. It's also useful to explore your own feelings and thoughts in relation to different family types and in particular families with two mums or two dads. Use the reactions of the children as teachable moments to clarify and extend concepts. It’s also important to be affirming and positive of all responses even if you can’t answer some questions because of the age range and school sensitivity around some concepts. A child can’t have two mums or two dads! “Some families have a Mom and a Dad, and some have two moms and two dads, but what is most important is that a family is a place where there is love” That’s weird! “Sometimes we think things are weird when they are different, or haven’t seen them before, but it’s not nice to call families weird” That’s not a real family! “Families come in all shapes and sizes, and what’s most important about a family is that children have adults and parents who care and look after them, and that’s what makes a family” Be sure to include diversity of families in class discussions, displays and stories. Maths: Graph / Data activities Strand: Data Curricular Objective: represent and interpret a set of simple data using objects, models or pictures. Description: Discuss with students things they like to do with their families. Show the children a pre-made graph with several activities written at the top with a picture to represent each activity. Example- Eat, Take A Walk, Go On Trips. Students will decide which activity they like to do best with their families. Instruct them to place their cut out which will represent themselves underneath that activity. After each student has had a turn, students will interpret data by finding out how many liked each activity. Discuss which activity had the most and the least. English: My favourite food! Strand: Competence and confidence in using language Curricular Objective: talk about past and present experiences Description: Discuss how many families enjoy cooking together. Ask the children for examples of something’s they cooked in the past. Choose one, and see can the class come up with the steps to prepare it. Drama: My family having fun Strand: Exploring and making drama Curricular Objectives: use the ability to play at make-believe to enter fully into participation in drama Description: Have students stand in a circle and act out their favourite family activity. Other students copy the activity. Repeat with other students. Integration Written by Pól de Chnuic and designed by Fiona Ní Mhairtín

4 The Family Book Activity Sheet Draw a picture of you with your family on a special occasion

5 First and Second Class Different Families Resource “And Tango Makes Three” by Justin Richardson This resource will help you: teach and talk about different family types discuss the role of families bring visibility to different family types in an informal way Why use this resource sheet and book? Using this book and sheet will stimulate discussion around different family types. It will allow children to develop their own understanding by asking questions and challenging their own concepts and ideas around family types. It can be used to introduce the concept of families with two mums and two dads and show that they behave and act in just the same way as other families, developing a “just like us attitude” in the children. The extension activities and worksheet will integrate and extend your work using the book. Key themes: family care looking after one another love life cycle of a penguin chick Sensitive themes: two male penguins adopt an egg and create a family unit Subject: S.P.H.E Strand/Strand Unit: Myself and others; Myself and my family Objectives (Pg. 31 Primary School Curriculum, S.P.H.E) identify / talk about those who live at home and recognise that homes and families can vary, for example exploring who lives at home and what nouns / words are used to describe them recognise his / her role and place in the family unit and the contribution made by each family member appreciate his / her own family and identify ways in which members of families can help, support and care for each other explore many of the things that are learned in families, both practical and otherwise Questions:  Can you remember any of the families of animals in the zoo?  Why were Silo and Roy different from the other couples?  Who is in your family?  What did they do together?  Name some things your family and you do together?  When did they feel left out?  What did Mr Gramzay give them?  How did they care for the egg?  How does your family care for you?  What did they show their chick when it was born?  What do all families have in common? Follow up activities Accompanying Activity: complete the activity sheet that accompanies this resource and discuss the children's’ pictures / sentences Paired Activity: list all the different ways that our families care for us / keep us safe Class Activity: retell the story in order Written Response: write a recount piece on a family trip Creative Response: draw a picture of the penguins caring for the egg Creative Writing: write an imaginative diary entry about the penguins story as the zookeeper

6 Think and be ready! Being prepared with responses will help children with tricky questions, extend their understanding and challenge any misconceptions or stereotypes. Being prepared with responses will help children with tricky questions, extend their understanding and challenge any misconceptions or stereotypes. It's also useful to explore your own feelings and thoughts in relation to different family types and in particular families with two mums or two dads. Use the reactions of the children as teachable moments to clarify and extend concepts. It’s also important to be affirming and positive of all responses even if you can’t answer some questions because of the age range and school sensitivity around some concepts. I don't think two boy penguins can do that! “When Roy and Silo grew up they fell in love. Sometimes when boys and girls grow up they fall in love, and sometimes a boy falls in love with another boy, and sometimes a girl falls in love with another girl.” That’s weird! “Sometimes we think things are weird when they are different, or haven’t seen them before, but it’s not nice to call families weird.” That’s not a real family! “Families come in all shapes and sizes, and what’s most important about a family is that children have adults and parents who care and look after them, and that’s what makes a family.” Be sure to include diversity of families in class discussions, displays and stories Science: Life Cycle of an penguin / other plants Strand: Plants and Animals Curricular Objective: become familiar with the life cycles of common plants and animals. Description: Revise the sequence of events in the story – and discuss the life cycle of other plants and animals they know. Ask the children to work in pairs to figure out the life cycle of the penguin chick was. Show the children some plants that grow in the New York Zoo and ask the children could they draw a diagram to show the life cycle of these plants. Focus on what the chick, other animals and plants need to grow and develop. Ask the children is there anything specific etc. Maths: Counting Strand: Algebra Curricular Objective: Recognise patterns including odd and even numbers Description: Think of other groups of numbers – 2, 5, 10 etc. Get the children to count in those numbers. Ask the children to draw 6 groups of three and count how many penguins there were all together. Drama: Mind the egg! Strand: Co-operating and communicating using Drama Curricular Objectives: Develop the ability, out of role, to co-operate and communicate with others in helping to shape the drama Description: Ask students to get into pairs and discuss how they are going to look after their egg. Get them to improvise the actions; moving, squatting and swapping. Integration Written by Pól de Chnoc and designed by Fiona Ní Mhairtín

7 _________________________ And Tango Makes Three Activity sheet _________________________ Draw three scenes from the story in order and write a sentence about each scene

8 Third and Fourth Class Different Families Resource “The Seven Chinese Sisters ” by Kathy Tucker This resource will help you: teach and talk about different family types discuss the role of families and roles in families bring visibility to different family types in an informal way Why use this resource sheet and book? Using this book and sheet will stimulate discussion around different family types. It will allow children to develop their own understanding by asking questions and challenging their own concepts and ideas around family types. It can be used to introduce the concept of families with two mums and dads and show that they behave and act in just the same way as other families, developing a “just like us attitude” in the children. The extension activities and worksheet will integrate and extend your work using the book. Key themes: family care looking after one another love different contributions and roles of family members Sensitive themes: there are absent parents the right to be cared for by those best able Subject: S.P.H.E Strand/Strand Unit: Myself and others; Myself and my family Objectives: (Pg. 46 Primary School Curriculum, S.P.H.E) explore and discuss different kinds of families, recognising that families vary in structure, in the way they communicate and in the way family members spend their time recognise that each member has a place and role in the family and contributes to the effective functioning of the family explore what belonging to a family means and that family members love, protect provide and care for each other Questions:  What does this story tell us about what family does for us?  What role did each sister have?  Would they have saved their younger sister without each others special talents?  What jobs do you do at home?  Who is in your family?  What roles do people in your family have?  This story shows us that seven sisters live together as a family unit, do you know any other different types of family units?  What makes a family special?  Who do you think are the best people to care for children in families? Follow up activities Accompanying Activity: Complete the activity where the children draw and write about the talents in their own families. Class Discussion: Talk about different roles family members play – Dad makes the dinner, Mum washes up, Dad minds the children, Mum works, sibling roles and so on – discuss how they all contribute to the family unit running smoothly. Paired Work: Create a list of all the talents different members of their families have. Written Response: Create a Diary entry from the perspective of one of the sisters.

9 Teachable Moments In 3 rd and 4 th class many children are of an age when they have heard words like ‘gay’ and ‘lesbian’, often they hear these words used inappropriately. At this stage it is timely to explain that these are words people use to describe themselves and what they mean. Explaining to children that gay is a word to describe sexual orientation and not a slang term, especially during discussions around respect and tolerance of different families. Teachable moments will help further with this area, where overheard put downs using ‘gay’ can be moments to teach the meaning. Stop it: Keep it simple with quick responses. “It’s not okay to use the word gay to slag someone off”. “It’s not okay to say something is gay just because you don’t like it”. Educate: If you have the time and opportunity to educate on the spot, do it. If you don’t make time later. “The word gay is used to describe…” Be proactive: Teach the terminology and have inclusive and respectful discussions about difference. Maths: Counting Strand; Algebra / Number patterns and sequences Curricular Objective: explore, recognise and record patterns in number, Description: Imagine your special talent is to count in unusual or different number patterns like 12’s, 15’s, 23’s. Continue this pattern until 10,000. Ask the children can they recognise their friends patterns. Drama: Acting out Strand: Co-operating and communicating using Drama Curricular Objectives: develop the ability, out of role, to co-operate and communicate with others in helping to shape the drama Description: Ask the children to develop an improvisation of a time when they were helping out at home – focus on what they were doing and what others were doing. Integration Gay: A man who has or wants to have a loving relationship with another man. Lesbian: A women who has or wants to have a loving relationship with another women. Socratic Questioning Being prepared with responses will help children with tricky questions, however the Socratic questioning technique will extend their understanding and challenge their ideas and preconceptions. It will not need you to take a position. The main aim of questioning is not to support any one idea but to challenge attitudes and develop critical thinking skills. 1.Clarification of a key concept: “Could you explain that answer further?”, “What led you to that judgement?”, “Why did you come to that conclusion?”. “What made you say that?” 2: Challenging assumptions and misconceptions: “Is there another point of view?”, “Is this always the case?” 3: Arguments based on evidence: “What evidence do you have to support that view?”, “Is there any other information that would help support this?”, “Could we challenge that evidence?”, 4: Looking at alternatives: “Did anyone look at this from a different angle/ perspective?”, “Is there an alternative to that point?”, “Could we approach this from a different perspective?” 5: Consequences, implications and analysis: “What are the long-term implications of this?”, “However, what if happened?”, “How would......affect..?” Written by Pól de Chnuic and designed by Fiona Ní Mhairtín

10 The Seven Chinese Sisters Activity Sheet Imagine you are rewriting this story about your own family. What special skills or talents would you have? _________________________

11 Fifth and Sixth Class Different Families Resource “The Different Dragon” By Jennifer Bryan This resource will help you: teach and talk about different family types bring visibility to different family types in an informal way develop concepts and critical thinking skills Why use this resource sheet and book? Using this book and sheet will stimulate discussion around different family types. It will allow children to develop their own understanding by asking questions and challenging their own concepts and ideas around family types. It can be used to introduce the concept of families with two mums or two dads and show that they behave and act in just the same way as other families, developing a “just like us attitude” in the children. The extension activities and worksheet will integrate and extend your work using the book. Key themes: family telling stories at bedtime the power of story Kindness reflection on how we have changed since children Sensitive themes: the boy has two mothers Subject: S.P.H.E Strand/Strand Unit: Myself and others; Myself and my family Objectives: (Pg. 61 Primary School Curriculum, S.P.H.E) explore and discuss families and homes and how they can vary in many ways explore what belonging to a family means discuss possible changes in family relationships and expectations as he/she grows and matures discuss and identify behaviour that is important for harmony in family life critically examine how the media portrays families and family life Questions:  What important family activity is used in the book to tell the story?  Can you remember bedtime stories?  What was your favourite?  Who is Go-Ma?  Do you know any other family types?  What family types do we see mostly in T.V programmes?  Do you still get bedtime stories?  How has your routine at home in the evening changed?  What else has changed about what your family do for you since you were younger?  What things help keep harmony in your family? Follow up activities Accompanying Activity: Children compare the opinions they have and their parents have on contentious issues! Class Discussion: Discuss and elaborate on different family types and where / how they know about them. Ask the children about TV programmes with families and what way are they portrayed. Creative Response: Get the children to write out their favourite childhood bedtime story with a twist. Critical Response: Class debate; You are never too old for bedtime stories.

12 Teachable Moments In 5 th and 6 th class many children are of an age when they have heard words like ‘gay’ and ‘lesbian’, often they hear these words used inappropriately. At this stage it is timely to explain that these are words people use to describe themselves and what they mean. Explaining to children that gay is a word to describe sexual orientation and not a slang term, especially during discussions around respect and tolerance of different families. Teachable moments will help further with this area, where overheard put downs using ‘gay’ can be moments to teach the meaning. Stop it: Keep it simple with quick responses. “It’s not okay to use the word gay to slag someone off”. “It’s not okay to say that something is gay because you don’t like it”. Educate: If you have the time and opportunity to educate on the spot, do it. If you don’t make time later. “The word gay is used to describe…” Be proactive: Teach the terminology and have inclusive and respectful discussions about difference. Be sure to include diversity of families in class discussions, displays and stories. History: Chinese New Year Strand: Story, Myths and Legends Curricular objective: listen to a wider range of more complex myths and legends from different cultural backgrounds in Ireland and other countries. Description: Discuss myths and legends from Ireland and introduce the Chinese new year and the story that goes with it. Discuss the symbols associated with Chinese New Year. Contrast these symbols with ones we have at new year. History: Human Rights defenders (activists) Strand: Stories from the lives of people in the past Curricular objective: Discuss and record the lives of people who have contributed to social and political developments Description : Human Rights defenders have long been synonymous with the rights of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) people. While discussing human rights defenders, be sure to include those who ……..defend LGBT rights. Integration Gay: A man who has or wants to have a loving relationship with another man. Lesbian: A women who has or wants to have a loving relationship with another women. Socratic Questioning Being prepared with responses will help children with tricky questions, however the Socratic questioning technique will extend their understanding and challenge their ideas and preconceptions. It will not need you to take a position. The main aim of questioning is not to support any one idea but to challenge attitudes and develop critical thinking skills. 1.Clarification of a key concept: “Could you explain that answer further?”, “What led you to that judgement?”, “Why did you come to that conclusion?”. “What made you say that?” 2: Challenging assumptions and misconceptions: “Is there another point of view?”, “Is this always the case?” 3: Arguments based on evidence: “What evidence do you have to support that view?”, “Is there any other information that would help support this?”, “Could we challenge that evidence?” 4: Looking at alternatives: “Did anyone look at this from a different angle/ perspective?”, “Is there an alternative to that point?”, “Could we approach this from a different perspective?” 5: Consequences, implications and analysis: “What are the long-term implications of this?”, “However, what if happened?”, “How would......affect?” Written by Pól de Chnuic and designed by Fiona Ní Mhairtín

13 A Different Dragon Activity Sheet As we grow older we begin to develop ideas and opinions that are different than our parents. Below compare and contrast the opinion your parents have and the opinions you have. Homework My opinion My parents opinion Bedtime My future Money Housework


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