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Radu Groza – Integrated Team Manager, 0-11 & 12+ Coastal Integrated Team Helen Davison – Practice Manager, 12+ North & East Ipswich and Coastal CIN team.

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Presentation on theme: "Radu Groza – Integrated Team Manager, 0-11 & 12+ Coastal Integrated Team Helen Davison – Practice Manager, 12+ North & East Ipswich and Coastal CIN team."— Presentation transcript:

1 Radu Groza – Integrated Team Manager, 0-11 & 12+ Coastal Integrated Team Helen Davison – Practice Manager, 12+ North & East Ipswich and Coastal CIN team

2 Structure of Session 9.30 am Welcome, Introductions & Aims of the session 9.45 am Use of the genogram in practice based on SoSW model (presentation, small group exercise, discussion and reflection in the large group) am Coffee Break am Signs of Safety and Wellbeing as a “questioning approach” (presentation, role play exercise, discussion and reflection in the large group) am Summary and suggestions for future sessions noon End of session

3 Aims of the session - Signs of Safety and Wellbeing – new model of practice being implemented across CYPS team - Practitioners already have a variety of skills and expertise in working with children, young people and families e.g. use of Genograms in assessment work and various interventions/ direct work, skills of engagement with children and parents/ carers - Aim of first part of the session: to enable participants to explore ways of using genograms in practice based on SoSW model - Aim of second part of the session: to provide opportunity for practitioners to consolidate their skills in asking questions in line with the SoSW approach

4 Genogram (Family Tree) - A visual tool that enables practitioners to explore with family members their history and relationships, both current and previous. - Benefits of using genograms (Parker and Bradley; 2003): 1. Facilitates disclosure of unanticipated information 2. Enables gathering of more comprehensive information 3. Enables family members’ active participation in the identification and analysis of relevant information resulting in them feeling more in control of their own lives 4. Facilitates an indirect approach to assessment which is inclusive, non-judgmental and enables positive rapport

5 Common Symbols used in Genogram Construction (1) Male Female Unborn Child

6 Common Symbols used in Genogram Construction (2) Brief or transient relationship Marriage or enduring partnership Relationship ended Deceased

7 Tips for Constructing Genograms - Place male parent to the left - Place female parent to the right - Place oldest child to the left - Put age inside the symbol - Place children in the family at the bottom of the page - Draw relationship lines once all significant family members have been identified

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9 Small groups exercise In small groups of 5-6 people have a discussion about : 1. How has the genogram been used effectively in Signs of Safety practice so far? 2. What would be other ways of effectively using the genogram in future SoS practice? Feedback and discussion in the large group.

10 Some Ideas about Possible Use of the Genogram in SoSW Practice Case Mapping - Identification of complicating factors such as parental separation, lack of contact with grandparents/ extended family, intergenerational alcohol/ drugs misuse, loss and bereavement - Identification of examples of past, current or potential harm e.g. parent discloses that child cannot see ex-partner as child was in the past hit by the ex- partner; mother discloses she just left partner as she was beaten by him; grandfather is in the prison for sexual offence against a minor;

11 - Identification of worries: mum not allowing child to visit ex-partner, child’s father as she does not like father’s new partner; young person does not see older sister as she has young children and young person is aggressive towards children - Identification of strengths and existing safety within the family’s network: child’s close relationships with grandparents; uncle able to look after child and take to school when mum feeling low; aunt is supervising contact between child and father. Some Ideas about Possible Use of the Genogram in SoSW Practice (2)

12 Some Ideas about Possible Use of the Genogram in SoSW Practice (3) Safety Planning & Reunification - Early Identification of relevant people to be involved in Family / Network Meetings - Involvement of people from family’s network in the safety plan for the child e.g. child to be cared for by grandparents when young parent goes to a party, aunt to supervise contact as part of reunification plan - Basis for use of Family Safety Circles tool (Susie Essex) to identify and involve in safety plan people from the family’s network (alongside eco-map).

13 Some Ideas about Possible Use of the Genogram in SoSW Practice (4) Individual Supervision – when discussing more complex cases as part of case mapping - Use of genogram enable supervisors to assimilate complex information about family more quickly - Should be part of the case mapping process and dynamics ideally being completed together by practitioner and supervisor rather than using a genogram already available on the file Group Case Mapping Sessions – Facilitator/ Practice Lead provides consultation to practitioner on a complex /stuck case within a group setting

14 Questioning Approach- one of the main principles of the SoSW model (as opposed to an “Expert” approach) Skills base supporting the SoSW model: - Questioning based on solution focussed brief therapy - Safety planning - Engagement of children - Skilful use of authority (as opposed to oppressive use of authority) Sings of Safety and Wellbeing as a “Questioning Approach”

15 Solution Focussed Brief Therapy Questioning Types of questions: Scaling questions – useful for identifying how clients feel about something, for identifying solutions, setting goals and next steps; “safety scale” specific to SoSW approach Exception questions (looking back for solutions) – if problem is not always occurring there may be potential solutions that are not being noticed easily Preferred future questions (looking forward to solutions); including “miracle” questions – helpful if clients feel overwhelmed by the problem and cannot recall exceptions from past; helpful for setting goals Coping questions – helpful when clients feel change is not possible or is beyond their control Alternative perspective (relationship) questions – helpsclients to look at the situation from a different perspective

16 Examples of Scaling Questions - “On a scale from 0 to 10 when 0 is the lowest you have ever felt and 10 is the most positive you have been, where would you say you are in terms of how you are feeling”? - “On a scale from 0 to 10 where 0 is I cannot stand my son and feel nothing for him and 10 is I love my son dearly and I am happiest when I spend time with him where are you now?” - “You say you are a 4. What is in place that helps you to be a 4 rather than a zero or a one? What else? What else? “ - “What would be the smallest thing that would need to happen for you to be able to say you are at 5 on the scale? What else? What else?” - “What would be the first sign that will tell you that you have moved from 4 to 5?” - “Who would be the first person to notice that you’ve moved up one point? - What would they see? And what else?”

17 Examples of Exception Questions “ You told me that two years ago Social Care closed the case as things got better. What was working well at the time? What else?” “Have there been any times in the past when felt more positive about life?” “Have there been any times in the past when you felt you got on well with your son?” “What’s different about the time when things were better? What else?” “What would you say you were doing differently during those times?” What else? “What would need to happen for that to happen more often? What else?” “The school told us that your son missed 5 out of the last 10 days at school. What was different on the 5 days when he did go to school? What else?”

18 Examples of Preferred Future Questions “How would you know if the problem was a bit better?” “What would need to happen for the problem to be a bit better?” The Miracle Question: “If a miracle happened overnight and all the problems were sorted (and there was no need for Social Care to be involved) what would you see different for you and the children the day after the miracle has happened?” What else? What difference would your mother/ son/daughter notice? Has any of this happened before? What would need to happen for things to be like on the day after the miracle? What else?

19 Examples of Coping Questions - “With all that has been happening in your life lately with your partner leaving and you feeling low I am wondering how you’ve managed to get through each day?” - How are you managing to cope with all this? - What keeps you going? - What do you do that stops the situation getting worse? - When you were in a similar situation in the past what helped you get through? What else? - Who is your greatest support? - What do they do that is helpful?

20 Examples of Relationship Questions “What would your mother notice about you if you were feeling a bit more positive about life?” “What would your friend say are the best things about you being a mum?” “What would the teacher say that your son is good at?” “What would the family support practitioner notice when she visits if your relationship with your son was a bit better?” “What would your son say he enjoys most about the times when he is with you?”

21 Role Play Exercise Based on scenario provided in groups of 3 practitioners (“Practitioner”, “Mother” and “Observer”): “Practitioner” to aim to ask at least 2 questions from each of the 5 types of solution focussed questions (approx. 20 minutes) At the end of role play “Observer” to give feedback to the person that played the “Practitioner” highlighting at least two things they were impressed with regarding the way they conducted the session (approx. 5 minutes) “Observer” to then ask person that played “Mother” scaling question about how confident they are following today’s session in using genograms and solutions focussed questions in their practice. Followed by “What is in place that makes it the figure given and not a lower one” and “What would need to happen for the score to be one point higher”. (approx. 10 minutes) Feedback and reflection in the large group. (approx. 10 minutes)

22 Further information & resources development Contact details: Radu Groza – Integrated Team Manager Helen Davison– Practice Manager End of Session

23 REFERENCES CAMH “What Are Some Examples of Solution-Focussed Questions” (accessed August 2014)www.camh.net CWDC (2011) “Supervision Guide A Practical Guide for Supervising Children’s Social Workers” CWDC: Leeds Parker J. & Bradley G. (2003) “Social Work Practice: Assessment, Planning, Intervention and Review” Learning Matters: Exeter “Solution Focussed Therapy” (accessed August 2014)www.getselfhelp.co.uk Turnell, A. (2013) “Safety Planning Workbook” Resolution Consultancy Pty Ltd Turnell, A. (2012) “”The Signs of Safety Workbook” Resolution Consultancy Pty Ltd


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