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Key Trends, Challenges & Opportunities ASA SymposiumPresentation by:Joe Goehring Stowe, VermontVP Industrial Sales August 5, 2014Domino Foods, Inc.

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Presentation on theme: "Key Trends, Challenges & Opportunities ASA SymposiumPresentation by:Joe Goehring Stowe, VermontVP Industrial Sales August 5, 2014Domino Foods, Inc."— Presentation transcript:

1 Key Trends, Challenges & Opportunities ASA SymposiumPresentation by:Joe Goehring Stowe, VermontVP Industrial Sales August 5, 2014Domino Foods, Inc.

2 Key Operations 2 390,000 acres Farming 12,500,000 tonnes cane Harvesting 6 sugar mills in 4 countries Milling 11 refineries in 7 countries Refining 10 leading brands Sales 150+ years of experience Know-how 2 biomass cogeneration plants Power 1 alcohol plant Alcohol Note: ASR Group and affiliates.

3 Sugar from field to table 3  One of largest sugarcane farming groups globally  6 sugar mills  15 MMT sugarcane crushing capacity  690,000 MWhr p.a. from biomass  Leading marketer and distributor of packaged sweeteners globally  Manage 50+ facilities throughout the Americas and Europe  #1 global sugar refiner  11 refineries  6 MMT sugar refining capacity Sugarcane Farming & MillingSugar RefiningPackaging & Distribution Vertically-Integrated From the Farm to the Table Note: ASR Group and affiliates. We have more than 150 years of experience taking sugar cane from the field to the table. Our expertise with the cane sugar process is without equal in the industry.

4  Total land (a) : 170,000 acres  # sugar mills: 1  Cane crushing capacity: 3.2mmt p.a.  Energy production: 200,000 MWHr p.a.  Total land (a) : 170,000 acres  # sugar mills: 1  Cane crushing capacity: 3.2mmt p.a.  Energy production: 200,000 MWHr p.a. Dominican Republic  Total land (a) : 39,000 acres  # sugar mills: 1  Cane crushing capacity: 1.3mmt p.a.  Energy production: 60,000 MWHr p.a.  Total land (a) : 39,000 acres  # sugar mills: 1  Cane crushing capacity: 1.3mmt p.a.  Energy production: 60,000 MWHr p.a. Mexico Our farming & milling asset base  Total land (a) : 74,000 acres  # sugar mills: 1  Cane crushing capacity: 1.2mmt p.a.  Energy production: 110,000 MWHr p.a.  Total land (a) : 74,000 acres  # sugar mills: 1  Cane crushing capacity: 1.2mmt p.a.  Energy production: 110,000 MWHr p.a. Belize Mill Biomass cogen plant Legend  One of the top global sugarcane agricultural players  390,000 acres directly farmed by our Group  Extensive experience working with 3 rd party growers  6 mills with cane crushing capacity of 15 MMT  4 biomass plants producing 690,000 MWHr p.a. 4 (a)Total land under cane. Includes own land as well as land farmed by third-party sugarcane growers. Note: ASR Group and affiliates.  Total land (a) : 285,000 acres  # sugar mills: 3  Cane crushing capacity: 8.6mmt p.a.  Energy production: 320,000 MWHr − Largest biomass plant in North America  Total land (a) : 285,000 acres  # sugar mills: 3  Cane crushing capacity: 8.6mmt p.a.  Energy production: 320,000 MWHr − Largest biomass plant in North America South Florida

5 Sustainability Components Three components: People – How the Company treats people (Consumers, Employees, Communities). Planet – Conscious respect for our planet and its’ resources. Profits – Cost conscious, efficiency driven & profitable for the long run. Sustainability 5 SUSTAIN- ABILITY SWEET SPOT

6 Audits, Audits & More Audits Quality Audits (GFSI, ISO, AIB, SQF, etc.) 1.3 rd Party 2.Customer Social Responsibility Audits 1.Bonsucro 2.Proterra Kosher Certificates & Compliance Organic Sugar Certification Regulatory Audits 1.FDA 2.Regional Air Quality 3.EPA 4.Coast Guard for MARSAC compliance

7 Sustainability – Florida Crystals FCC Measures and Benchmarks Sustainability Performance  Soil conservation  Efficient use of inputs: water, energy, and chemicals  Carbon footprint  Responsible management of waste streams Why?  Sustainability practices are strongly correlated to cost and efficiency  Inform and drive internal improvements  Land and environmental stewardship are important to FCC How?  Methodologies, indicators, and benchmarks are based on international standards, widely accepted industry practices and standards, and regulatory requirements 7

8 A multi-faceted approach Water Conservation Waste Reduction GHG Reduction Energy Efficiency Corporate Citizenship Social Responsibility 8

9 Water Conservation From the sugar cane we grow in our fields to the processes we use in our refineries and packaging plants, water is an important ingredient in our business. Reducing our water usage is significant for a number of reasons. The systems required to move water through our fields and refineries use energy. Reducing the water we use, therefore, immediately lowers our energy consumption. Just as important, reducing our water usage lowers our impact on nearby water resources. We have a robust water-reduction program, and we have been decreasing our usage across the entire production process. Two types of water are used to make our products: potable water (7%) and raw water (93%), which comes directly from local natural resources. In 2013, our total global use of potable water was reduced by 4% across all facilities In 2013, we reduced our water usage per 100 pounds of finished product by 2%. In 2013, our overall sugar effluent (remaining potable water after sugar making process is complete) was reduced by 5% against the previous year.

10 Waste Reduction Across every aspect of our business, reducing waste is a significant part of our sustainability program. In FY2013, our waste-reduction program yielded in an impressive 9% decrease of total waste disposed from packaging, general plant, office and food waste streams. Recycling is a key part of our initiative, as it reduces our waste-to-landfill output and provides a positive reuse of waste. Although recycling rates vary greatly by facility (from 0% to 99%), in FY2013, the average recycling rate across all of our facilities was 40%—a 12% improvement from the previous year. We’ve also made enormous strides when it comes to reusing our sugar-refining- process byproducts, such as calcium carbonate cake and diatomaceous earth. These materials are high in nutrients and minerals, making them attractive as agricultural fertilizers. In FY2013, we diverted 97% of the calcium carbonate cake and biomass/soil byproducts. Our waste-reduction numbers are forecasted to improve even further in the future. Our engineers are researching and developing innovations that may enable the company to further the options for reuse of calcium carbonate cake in a range of materials, from automotive plastics to recycled cardboard to poultry feed supplements.

11 Green House Gas (GHG) Reduction What are the greenhouse gas emissions we measure? 1.Carbon Dioxide (CO2) 2.Methane (CH4) 3.Nitrous Oxide (N2O) 4.Sulphur Hexafluoride (SF6) 5.Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) 6.Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs)

12 Green House Gas (GHG) Reduction The primary causes of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions include the use of fossil fuels, such as natural gas and oil. As recommended by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development, we measure GHG emissions using standardized scope measurements. Reducing our energy consumption lowers our GHG emissions and shrinks our carbon footprint. According to a 2010 study, a typical sugar cane refinery emits approximately pounds of CO2e* for each CWT of refined sugar it produced. We are pleased to report that our refineries significantly outperform this industry baseline. Our average GHG value across all our refineries was 18 pounds of CO2e/CWT of sugar. GHG emissions for our non-refining operations continue to be relatively small, in comparison, registering at 8 pounds of CO2e/CWT.

13 Energy Efficiency From , the ASR-Group reduced our energy usage by a weighted average 12%. In FY 2013, we were able to decrease fossil fuel use across our company by an additional 6%. Cogeneration: We have been using cogeneration at many of our facilities for over 80 years. Our co-generation facilities (using biomass) are 70-80% efficient vs. typical fossil fuel energy plants that are only 33% efficient. In FY 2013, the ASR-Group generated an excess of 61,256 megawatt hours of electricity—enough to power 2,060 homes for an entire year.

14 Corporate Citizenship We strive to meet a standard as an outstanding employer and to ensure high levels of employee commitment by focusing on these core values: Doing Business with Integrity Promoting a Discrimination-Free and Harassment-Free Workplace Ensuring Workplace Health and Safety Providing Ongoing Training and Leadership Investing in Corporate Philanthropy Developing and promoting Community programs

15 How we do it? Corporate Social Responsibility STEP 1 Suppliers commit to ASR Ethical Sourcing Code STEP 1 Suppliers commit to ASR Ethical Sourcing Code STEP 2 Self assessment on each supplier to prioritise further checks STEP 2 Self assessment on each supplier to prioritise further checks STEP 3 Independent audits against Pro- Terra Standard STEP 3 Independent audits against Pro- Terra Standard STEP 4 Feedback, remediation and monitoring work with supplier STEP 4 Feedback, remediation and monitoring work with supplier 5 critical compliance factors  No child, forced, slave or bonded labour is used  A worker health and safety program must be in place and active  Land use is legal and ethical  Bribery or corruption does not take place  A plan to mitigate environmental impact must be in place and active 3 STEP 1 Suppliers commit to ASR Ethical Sourcing Code STEP 1 Suppliers commit to ASR Ethical Sourcing Code STEP 2 Self assessment on each supplier to prioritize further checks STEP 2 Self assessment on each supplier to prioritize further checks

16 30% improvement in productivity in Belize Bringing piped water to rural communities in Fiji Maintenance of equipment in Guyana Fairtrade also a key element social responsibility & environmental sustainability 16 Funding for schools in rural Fiji Biological Pest Control in Belize Fertilizer subsidy in Jamaica

17 Why we use Pro-Terra social responsibility & environmental sustainability  Pro-Terra similar to other standards such as Fairtrade & Bonsucro  We have used it since 2007  We have chosen it because of its: — excellent coverage of human rights and environmental issues — high level of acceptance by suppliers — relevance to large and small agriculture and cane mills — verifiability by 3 rd party auditors  Audit of each mill and its suppliers typically 5 days and costs £10,000  Desk research sensitises auditor to any issues for specific focus. 17

18  Our Company Mission Has Several Important Fronts  Providing High Quality & Innovative Products  Our Ability To Deliver Exceptional Service  Continually Innovating New Products That Our Customers Want  Successfully Anticipating & Satisfying Our Customers Product Needs We Are Always Moving Forward…. 18


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