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Developed in collaboration with Connecting VEX and ROBOTC Mechanical, Computer Programing, & Electrical Engineer Responsibilities.

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Presentation on theme: "Developed in collaboration with Connecting VEX and ROBOTC Mechanical, Computer Programing, & Electrical Engineer Responsibilities."— Presentation transcript:

1 Developed in collaboration with Connecting VEX and ROBOTC Mechanical, Computer Programing, & Electrical Engineer Responsibilities

2 Engineering Roles We will be forming groups of 3 students Throughout your work within Automation Through Programming, you will be required to rotate through 3 different Engineering Roles: –Mechanical Engineering –Computer Programming –Electrical Engineering

3 Mechanical Engineer The Mechanical Engineer will be responsible for sketching and building the final product on the Automation Through Programing project summary.

4 Mechanical Engineer continued It is recommended that you use isometric and perspective drawings to help explain ideas between group members, but the final sketch should be orthographic with at least a front and top view

5 Computer Programmer Engineer The Computer Programmer will help design the mechanism and complete the necessary program in ROBOTC using the PLTW template. The Program will be printed and attached to each Programming Project Summary

6 Electrical Engineer The Electrical Engineer will work with the Mechanical Engineer to connect the battery, motors, and sensors to the mechanism. He or She will also work with the Computer Programmer to complete the motors and sensors set-up.

7 Electrical Engineer continued A completed schematic on the Project Sheet will also be the responsibility of the Electrical Engineer

8 Things Your Team Will Need To Know The following slides will give you an overview of some things your team will need to know There will be more detailed information to come

9 Cortex The VEX Cortex Microcontroller coordinates the flow of information and power on the robot. All electronic system components must interface to the Microcontroller. The Microcontroller is the brain of every VEX robot.

10 Power 1.Keep batteries charged – In order for a robot to operate, it needs a power source. A 7.2V NiCd rechargeable battery is used with your VEX robot. Attach a battery strap to your model. When your team is ready to test your model, retrieve a battery from the container of charged batteries. Attach the battery to the model using the strap and plug it in to the Cortex. At the end of class put your battery on the VEX charger so it will be ready for the next class.

11 Motors 2. Attach Motors to the model and Cortex Motors are devices that can transform electrical energy into mechanical energy. They take electrical power and create rotary motion. Use motors to power the robot’s drive wheels. The wheels need to make continuous full rotations, which is exactly the kind of motion provided by the motors. Rotation for forward motion is shown.

12 Motors 2-wire motors can be connected directly to ports 1 and 10 on the VEX Cortex The VEX Motor Controller 29 allows you to connect the VEX 2-wire Motors to any of the standard 3-wire ports on the VEX Cortex. To use the VEX Motor Controller 29, plug the 3-wire end into one of the MOTOR ports (2- 9) on your VEX Cortex Microcontroller.

13 Motors Connect the other end of the VEX Motor Controller to the 2-wire Motor. Be sure to align the black and red wires. To prevent the 2-wire Motor and Motor Controller wires from accidentally separating while the robot is running, use the supplied wire ties to secure the two ends, along with any excess wire.

14 Claw Notice the motor used to open and close the claw. How many motors are needed for this project?

15 Sensors 2. Attach Sensors to the model and Cortex 4 Sensors: Touch / Bumper Switch Limit Switch Line Tracker Potentiometer

16 Bumper Switch Sensor Signal: Digital Sensor Values: 1 = pressed, 0 = released Description: The bumper sensor is a physical switch. It tells the robot whether the bumper on the front of the sensor is being pushed in or not. Type: SPST switch (“Single Pole, Single Throw”) configured for Normally Open behavior. Signal Behavior:

17 Limit Switch Sensor Signal: Digital Sensor Values: 1 = pressed, 0 = released Description: The limit switch sensor is a physical switch. It can tell the robot whether the sensor’s metal arm is being pushed in or not. Type: SPDT microswitch, configured for SPST Normally Open behavior. Signal Behavior:

18 Line Tracker Signal: Analog Sensor Values: Range from Description: A line follower consists of an infrared light sensor and an infrared LED. It works by illuminating a surface with infrared light; the sensor then picks up the reflected radiation and, based on its intensity, determines the reflectivity of the surface. Light colored surfaces will reflect more light than dark surfaces. This allows the sensor to detect a dark line on a pale surface, or a pale line on a dark surface.

19 Line Tracker You can use the line trackers to help your robot navigate along a marked path. A typical application uses three line follower sensors, such that the middle sensor is over the line your robot is following. The line followers are an analog sensor, meaning that its output covers a range of values (in this case, from zero to five volts) rather than being only on (five volts) or off (zero volts), as is the case for a digital sensor.

20 Line Tracker You can use the line trackers to discern the boundary between two high-contrast surfaces as well. The optimal range for the line tracker to read a value is ¼ in. In this elevator model, the line tracker sensor is used to determine if the elevator is at the correct floor. Line Tracker Paper – ¼ in from sensor

21 Potentiometer Signal: Analog Sensor Values: Range from Description: The Potentiometer is used to measure the angular position of the axle or shaft passed through its center. The center of the sensor can rotate roughly 265 degrees and outputs values ranging from to the Vex Microcontroller. Mounted Potentiometer CAUTION! When mounting the Potentiometer on your robot, be sure that the range of motion of the rotating shaft does not exceed that of the sensor. Failure to do so may result in damage to your robot and the Potentiometer.

22 ROBOTC - Programming 3. Work with the Computer Engineer to complete Motor and Sensor Setup Allows you to configure and name all of the motors and sensors connected to your robot.

23 Motor and Sensor Setup Type a name to describe the motor location. Remember Ports 1 and 10 can be used for 2 – wire motors, or use a Motor Controller 29 to plug into ports 2-9. Check reversed if you want the motor to turn in the opposite direction.

24 Motor and Sensor Setup Type a name to describe the sensor. Choose the type of sensor – the only analog sensors for GTT are Line Follower and Potentiometer.

25 Motor and Sensor Setup Type a name to describe the digital sensor location or purpose. Both the limit and bumper switches are Touch Type. LED’s can be plugged in to Digital Ports 1-12, the type is VEX LED.

26 Motor and Sensor Schematic 4. Complete the Motor and Sensor Schematic on Automation Through Programming Summary This information should match the motor and sensors setup done in ROBOTC

27 Resources Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy (2011). VEX Cortex Video Trainer. Retrieved from obotc_cortex/index.html obotc_cortex/index.html VEX Cortex Video Trainer –http://www.education.rec.ri.cmu.edu/products/t eaching_robotc_cortex/index.htmlhttp://www.education.rec.ri.cmu.edu/products/t eaching_robotc_cortex/index.html


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