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Living without Electricity Written by: Janie Harris, M.Ed., CRS Housing and Environment Specialist Modified by: Vincent Mannino, County Extension Director.

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Presentation on theme: "Living without Electricity Written by: Janie Harris, M.Ed., CRS Housing and Environment Specialist Modified by: Vincent Mannino, County Extension Director."— Presentation transcript:

1 Living without Electricity Written by: Janie Harris, M.Ed., CRS Housing and Environment Specialist Modified by: Vincent Mannino, County Extension Director

2 It’s Going to Happen A sudden ice storm Tornado Hurricane Severe thunderstorm Tree falling on your own personal segment of the grid Man-made – Faulty power company equipment – Accident-related

3 Effect is the Same Everything electrical in your home or business stops working Unknown when it will come back on May be off for minutes May be off for hours May be off for days

4 Loss of Power = Loss of Normalcy Cooking meals Lighting after dark Keeping warm or cool Information Water supply Septic system or sewage

5 What Can You Do If the Power Goes Off? Learn now what you can do to mitigate your difficulties Learn what you can do to keep your situation under control Don’t depend on utility companies to help immediately

6 Five Areas Critical to Daily Survival Light Water Cooking Heating/Cooling Communication Septic system for some Reference: Backwoods Home Magazine, Anita Evangelista

7 Light Flashlight – One for each family member – Three extra sets of batteries for each flashlight (all same size, if possible) – Store where you can reach it easily in the dark – Consider rechargeable batteries – DC-powered rechargers or solar rechargers

8 Light Lantern – Better for groups – Three extra sets of batteries for each lantern (all same size, if possible) – Store where you can reach it easily in the dark – Consider rechargeable batteries – DC-powered rechargers or solar rechargers

9 Light (continued) Candles Oil (kerosene) lamps Solar-powered lamps crank-generated power lamps

10 Water Public water supply Electrically powered home water pump Store water now – Bottled water – Rainwater harvesting system – Other sources of water in home Determine your household water needs IN ADVANCE 1 gallon per person per day

11 Cooking Grilling or barbecuing – Charcoals – Wood – Matches – Propane bottles for grill Campfire cooking Propane/butane camp stoves Solar cooking

12 Food Safety During Power Outages 1.Use food in the refrigerator first. 2.Freezer second - make a list of foods in the freezer to reduce # of times the freezer door is opened 3.Emergency food supplies third

13 Word About Refrigerators/Freezers 1.One person is in-charge of: 1.Opening refrigerators/freezers 2.Removing food 3.Deciding what foods to eat/prepare 4.Storing left-overs Try Me!

14 Keeping Foods Cool Ice Chests – not all the same Buried old broken freezer or refrigerator Kerosene refrigerator/freezer Portable battery-powered refrigerators Refrigerator that runs off DC and AC power that can be plugged into your car battery through the cigarette lighter outlet or into a solar power system

15 Keeping Foods Cool Not all foods need to be refrigerated Refrigerate meats, dairy products, and leftovers

16 Keeping Foods Cool Keep Frozen Food Safe Keep an appliance thermometer in the freezer. – temperature for a deep freezer is 0 o F Store meat/poultry on lowest shelves. Food in the freezer should stay frozen for 1-2 days depending on how full it is. Keep a list of foods inside freezer and refrigerator to keep from opening it too often One person should be in-charge of taking food out of the freezer or refrigerator

17 Keeping Foods Cool Keep Frozen Food Safe If thawed, many frozen foods can be refrozen IF ice crystals are present. If food is thawed but freezer temperature stays at 40 or below, the food should be safe to eat. If frozen foods have thawed and been at 40 ◦ F or warmer for 2 or more hours, some will need to be thrown out.

18 Foods that do not need refrigeration Grated Parmesan or Romano cheese (in a can or jar) Butter and margarine that is wrapped or in a covered container Raw fruits and vegetables (that have not been cut up) Peanut butter, jelly, relish, taco sauce, mustard, catsup, olives and pickles Worcestershire, soy and barbeque sauces

19 Vinegar-based dressings Dried and candied fruits and dates Hard cheese (Cheddar, Colby, Swiss, Parmesan, and Romano) Processed cheese Bread, rolls, cakes, muffins, quick breads and tortillas Waffles, pancakes and bagels Fruit pies Fresh mushrooms, herbs and spices Foods that do not need refrigeration

20 Keeping Foods Cool Pot-in-Pot method to cool fresh produce (use 2 unglazed clay pots, identical shape, one larger than the other) (plug holes in bottom)

21 Food Safety A fact sheet and PowerPoint presentation developed by Dr. Jenna Anding, Nutrition Specialist, focuses on: – Importance of food safety – Handling food and water safely after a disaster – Keeping food safe: when to keep it and when to throw it out after a disaster

22 Heating Wood-burning fireplace Wood stove Propane heaters Kerosene heaters Solar heat

23 Cooling a Residence Battery-powered fans Solar-powered fans Open windows (screens needed) Shades over outside of windows and doors where sun rays hit Hang a wet sheet over an open window, and let the wind blow through it

24 Communications Battery-powered radio – Batteries or radio plugged into car battery through the cigarette lighter Battery-powered TV (must be digital ) Phone plugged directly into the phone jack Shortwave radio Satellite Internet hookup that uses a battery- powered laptop Citizens band radios (CB) Short range FM-band devices

25 Keeping Things Normal Keep routines as close to normal as possible Do the same things you do when the power is on Practice living without electricity – Try campouts, – Outdoor cooking

26 Practice, practice, practice!

27 Do What Survivalist Do? Practice no television, radio or computer one day per month Cook entire meals outdoors once every two weeks Learn to use a Dutch oven outdoors

28 Do What Survivalist Do? Camp in the backyard on day per month or local campground Learn home food preservation Plant a garden or an edible landscape

29 Do What Survivalist Do? Preparing for an emergency Assemble your disaster supplies kit Pack enough supplies so you can take care of yourself and your family without any outside help for AT LEAST 3 days Kit contents will depend on: – Size of the family – Special needs

30 Do What Survivalist Do? What is in a Disaster Supply Kit? Food & Water (3-day supply) Utensils Clean air items (masks, plastic sheeting) – In case of chemical explosion Extra clothing First aid kit Emergency items (e.g. battery operated radio, flashlights, batteries, garbage bags, baby wipes, toilet paper) Special needs items (diapers, medications, etc)

31 Do What Survivalist Do? Protein barsReady-to-eat cereals Fruit barsSmoked/dried meat Granola barsCanned soups/stews Formula/baby foodFoods for medical cond. Dried &/or canned fruitMulti-vitamins Nuts/peanut butterComfort foods Crackers Canned juices Canned meats (tuna, chix, beef) Meals ready to eat (MREs) Shelf-stable milk Foods to include in a disaster kit

32 Do What Survivalist Do? Storing your emergency supplies Pack in air-tight containers or heavy duty plastic bags to keep moisture and insects out. Watch “best if used by” and/or expiration dates. Rotate food supplies If flooding is a concern, store off the floor.

33 articles2/evangelista73.html Questions ??? Resources:


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