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Successful Solutions Professional Development LLC Chapter 3 Medication Management.

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Presentation on theme: "Successful Solutions Professional Development LLC Chapter 3 Medication Management."— Presentation transcript:

1 Successful Solutions Professional Development LLC Chapter 3 Medication Management

2 High quality programs promote safe and healthy environments where children can thrive and grow. Young children depend upon the adults in their lives to make healthful choices for them and to teach them to make such choices for themselves. Chapter Topics A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

3 Child care centers are free to choose whether or not to give medications outside of those required by the ADA. The centers decision must be clearly documented in the health care policy and the parent handbook. If medications are required by the ADA, the parent must provide training and written instructions to caregivers on the proper administration of the medications or treatment required for the child. Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

4 If the center decides to give medications, specific procedures must be followed. Parents must fill out medication request forms and keep them current. To protect staff against lawsuits, child care programs have policies for medications. These policies must adhere to, but can exceed, the states licensing requirements. You should become familiar with the child care programs medication management policies. Always record the child's name, time and date, and the type and amount of medication given. Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

5 Providers are required to keep written documentation each time they give a child medication. These records must be kept in individual children's folders. That way, it is possible to see at a glance whether a particular child has a pattern of frequent illness. Medicines should be stored appropriately. Refrigerated medications should be stored in a secure, labeled container. Non- refrigerated medicines should be stored in a locked place out of the children's reach. It is important that medications contain a label specifying the child's name, physician's name, name of medication, dosage, and how often to administer. Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

6 Parents must give written consent before you give any child any medication. The parent consent form is good for the number of days stated on the medication bottle for prescriptions. You may not give medication past the days prescribed on the medication bottle even if there is medication left. Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

7 If you do not know the child well, verify his or her name before giving the medicine. This is especially true in programs where one person, such as the director, administers all medications. Always use caution when giving medications. Give the exact amount prescribed at the prescribed time. Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

8 Always read the label on the medication at least three times. First read the label as you remove the medication from storage to be sure you have the right medication for the right child. Read it again as you dispense the medicine into the measuring device. Look at the label one last time before giving the medicine to double check it is the right amount of the right medicine for the right child. Some child care programs have a designated staff person in charge of giving medications. That way there is less likelihood that someone will forget to give a needed medicine. Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

9 You will also want to designate a backup person in charge of medications for days when the regular person is absent. Remember, licensing requires that only staff who have been trained and oriented to your medication policies can give medications to children. You may not mix medications in formula or food unless you have written directions to do so from a health care provider with prescriptive authority. Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

10 You may not give the medication differently than the age and weight appropriate directions or the prescription directions on the medication label unless you have written directions from a health care provider with prescriptive authority before you give the medication. If the medication label does not give the dosage directions for the child's age or weight, you must have written instructions from a health care provider with prescriptive authority in addition to the parent consent prior to giving the medication. Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

11 You may be authorized to give medications for a long period of time to children with chronic or life threatening illnesses. A signed statement must accompany such medication from the child's health care provider or a prescription indicating the treatment is ongoing. Prescription medication must be in the original prescription bottle. Non-prescription medication must be in the original manufacturer's container with a label. The label needs to indicate recommended dosages for different ages and how long to use the medication if symptoms continue. Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

12 Children Taking Their Own Medications Children can take their own medication if they: Have a written statement from the parent requesting the child take his/her own medication Have a written statement from a health care provider with prescriptive authority stating that the child is physically and mentally capable of taking his/her own medication Meet all other criteria outlined in WAC including storage of medications Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

13 Children Taking Their Own Medications A staff member must observe and document that the child took the medication. Children are allowed to administer their own medication only under special circumstances. For example, older children with asthma may be allowed to use their own inhaler when it is needed. Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

14 What documentation is required when giving children medication? You must keep a confidential, written record in the child's file of: Child's full name, date, time, name of medication and amount given (indicate if self-administered) Initial of staff person giving medication or observing the child taking the medication with a corresponding signature on the medication record to validate the initials Provide a written explanation of why a medication that should have been given was not given Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

15 Medicines should also be stored appropriately. Refrigerated medications should be stored in a secure, labeled container. Non-refrigerated medicines should be stored in a locked place out of the children's reach. Left Over Medications You must not keep old medication on site. When a child is finished with a medication, you must either: Give it back to the parent Dispose of it by flushing medication(s) down the toilet Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

16 You can keep bulk containers of diaper ointments and non-talc type powders intended for use in the diaper area and sunscreen if you: Obtain written parental consent prior to use Use for no longer than six months Apply the ointments in a manner to prevent contaminating the bulk container Notify the parents of the: Name of the product used Active ingredients in the product Sun protective factor (SPF) in sunscreen Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

17 Baby powders, diaper ointments, and sunscreen are medications requiring signed parent consent. Parents also need to agree in writing that you may use these items from a common bulk supply on their child. Notify the parents of the names of the bulk items, their active ingredients and the staff procedures for application that will avoid contamination. If you choose to use a bulk container, you must ensure that there is no cross contamination. For example, if you use a tube ointment, squeeze a small amount on a paper towel, then administer the ointment. Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment

18 2 Click here to launch Chapter 3 Assessment Chapter 3 Medication Management A Basic Approach to a Clean and Healthy Environment


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