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Chapter 7 Safety in the Kitchen © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Objective Summarize the roles of government, employers, and employees in creating a safe.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 7 Safety in the Kitchen © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Objective Summarize the roles of government, employers, and employees in creating a safe."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Chapter 7 Safety in the Kitchen

3 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Objective Summarize the roles of government, employers, and employees in creating a safe workplace

4 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. The Safe Workplace The government established the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to ensure that employers train and supervise employees in safe work practices Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) When an accident or injury occurs, a supervisor must be informed and accident report forms must be filled out

5 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. The Safe Workplace An employee’s role in workplace safety includes –being alert and aware while at work –understanding everyday dangers in the kitchen –taking steps to prevent accidents –knowing what to do in the event of an accident or emergency –knowing who to contact in an emergency

6 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Objective Explain how the professional culinary uniform promotes safety

7 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Dress for Safety The modern chef uniform includes –chef jacket and pants –apron –footwear

8 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. The Chef Jacket and Pants The chef jacket –has long sleeves to protect arms from splatters of hot grease or intense heat –is double-breasted to protect the chest from heat –is white to reflect heat The pants –protect the legs from burns –are black and white checked to hide stains

9 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. The Apron Protects cooks from spills Can be removed quickly to minimize any burns from spills Should not be used for wiping hands

10 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Footwear Needs to be solid, well constructed, and comfortable Should have nonslip soles Never includes open-toed shoes or sandals

11 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Jewelry Jewelry does not belong in the kitchen –Rings, necklaces, earrings, and bracelets can get caught on moving equipment and cause serious injury –Small pieces of jewelry can fall into food and become a physical hazard

12 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Objective Recall common kitchen injuries and summarize steps to prevent or respond to accidents in the kitchen

13 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Kitchen Injuries Every professional kitchen should have a supervisor who is familiar with basic first aid First-aid kits should be properly stocked and accessible Never use anything in the first-aid kit that you have not been trained to use Always alert a supervisor before applying first aid

14 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Cuts Precautions to reduce the frequency and severity of cuts –Practice proper knife cutting skills –Knives should be carried by your side and pointed downward –Announce when you are carrying a knife –Never leave a knife or sharp object in a dishwashing sink

15 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Cuts Precautions (continued) –Never gesture with a knife –Never try to catch a falling knife –Use only sharp knives –Use knives only for appropriate tasks

16 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Puncture Wounds Puncture wounds –can be dangerous and may require further medical treatment –can deposit bacteria deep in the skin where it is hard to wash, which can lead to infection –must be washed well and an antibacterial product should be applied Seek medical attention if the wound is deep or becomes red and painful

17 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Falls Steps to prevent falls –Promptly wipe up spills and display a wet floor sign until the floor is dry –Clean greasy floors immediately –Do not place items like stockpots or cases of food on the floor –Do not run or push in the kitchen

18 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Falls Steps to prevent falls (continued) –Apply nonslip treads or place removable rubber mats wherever the floor is slippery –Keep aisles clear –Wear shoes with nonslip soles –Put ladders and stools away after using them

19 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Burns Ways to prevent burns –Never use a damp or wet towel as a hot pad –Use a hot pad that is sufficiently thick to properly protect your hand –Alert the dishwashing staff if you place a hot pan at a dishwashing station

20 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Burns Ways to prevent burns (continued) –Loudly warn others when carrying a hot pan or liquid through the kitchen –Never attempt to move anything hot that you cannot comfortably carry or lift –Avoid contact with steam when opening the door of a steamer or lifting the lid off a pot of boiling liquid

21 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Heat Exhaustion Drinking plenty of water is the first step in preventing heat exhaustionheat exhaustion If a person is experiencing symptoms of heat exhaustion, have them rest in a cool place and alert a supervisor

22 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Heat Exhaustion Serious heat exhaustion can lead to heatstroke heatstroke Heatstroke is potentially life threatening and requires immediate medical attention

23 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Back and Muscle Injuries Improper lifting can cause back and muscle injuries When lifting a heavy object, keep your back straight and bend your knees

24 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Back and Muscle Injuries Get assistance when lifting heavy or bulky items In the event of a muscle strain, seek medical assistance before continuing to work

25 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Repetitive Motion Injuries Repetitive motion injuries are caused by frequently performing the same action over a long period of time Vary tasks during the workday to prevent repetitive motion injuries

26 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Choking In a choking situation, the American Red Cross recommends the “five-and-five” response Proper training is recommended so you can respond appropriately in an emergency

27 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Allergic Reaction Signs of allergic reactions –Profuse sweating –Hives or skin rash –Difficulty breathing –Dizziness –Swelling –Unconsciousness

28 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Objective Implement basic fire prevention and safety practices

29 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Fire Safety Foodservice professionals must know how to prevent a fire and what to do if a fire occurs Fuel, oxygen, and heat must always be present to produce a fire

30 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Preventing Kitchen Fires Common preventable causes of foodservice fires –Improperly cleaned hood ventilation system –Excessive grease buildup on equipment –Failure to turn off all heat sources at closing –Use of damaged or improper size electrical cords

31 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Preventing Kitchen Fires Common preventable causes of foodservice fires (continued) –Unsteady, loose-fitting candleholders –Failure to extinguish candles at closing –Unextinguished cigarette butts in the garbage

32 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. What to Do If Fire Occurs Quickly assess the severity of the fire Evacuate immediately if the fire is spreading rapidly or you feel that you are in danger Once your safety is assured, call Even if a fire is brought under control by foodservice staff, the fire department should still inspect the damage

33 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Fire Extinguishers Every foodservice operation should have several fire extinguishers in the facilityfire extinguishers Courtesy of Fox Valley Fire and Safety

34 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Fire Extinguishers Each type of fire extinguisher is effective against a specific type of fire Fire extinguishers must be inspected periodically If a fire extinguisher is used, it must be refilled and recharged by a specialist

35 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Fire Extinguishers Follow the four-step PASS technique when using a fire extinguisher 1.Pull the pin at the top of the fire extinguisher 2.Aim at the base of the flames 3.Squeeze the trigger 4.Sweep back and forth so the entire base of the fire is covered repeatedly

36 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Kitchen Hood Fire Suppression Systems Kitchen hood fire suppression systems automatically detect and put out firesKitchen hood fire suppression systems Courtesy of Fox Valley Fire and Safety

37 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Kitchen Hood Fire Suppression Systems If the fire suppression system is engaged, –assess the fire and call the fire department, if necessary –discard food that has been contaminated by the chemical extinguisher

38 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Kitchen Hood Fire Suppression Systems If the fire suppression system is engaged, –call the health department to inspect the kitchen –call a licensed technician to recharge the fire suppression system

39 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Clothing on Fire If clothing catches on fire, immediately stop, drop, and roll Others can assist smothering the flames with a blanket or tablecloth Call emergency help immediately if necessary

40 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Fire Evacuation Plans Every kitchen should have a fire evacuation plan Employees must be trained and the plan posted in the kitchen Some restaurants may also have tornado, hurricane, or earthquake evacuation plans

41 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Fire Inspections All foodservice operations are inspected periodically by the local fire department Fire inspections help reduce the number of kitchen fires

42 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Natural Gas Leak Natural gas can be very dangerous because it is explosive Many stoves and ovens in commercial kitchens rely on natural gas If you smell natural gas, alert a supervisor immediately

43 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Review What role does the government play in creating a safe workplace? –OSHA defines and enforces safe working conditions

44 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Review What can an employer and employee do to keep the workplace safe? –The employer should create and maintain a safe workplace –Each employee is responsible for practicing safe working habits

45 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Review Describe how the professional culinary uniform promotes safety –Chef jacket protects arms and upper body from heat and burns; light color to keep cool –Pants protect the legs from burns –Aprons protect cooks from spills and minimize burns –Sturdy, comfortable shoes reduce fatigue and accidents

46 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Review List the types of common kitchen injuries –Cuts, puncture wounds, falls, burns, heat exhaustion, back and muscle injuries, repetitive motion injuries, choking, allergic reactions

47 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Review What should you do if a fire occurs? –Assess the severity, ensure your own safety, call 9-1-1

48 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Review What steps should you follow if your clothes catch on fire? –Stop, drop, and roll

49 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Glossary fire extinguisher. A pressurized canister filled with a substance that puts fires out. heat exhaustion. A heat-related condition that results when the body loses too much water and salt.

50 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Glossary heatstroke. A severe heat-related condition in which the body’s usual ability to deal with heat stress is lost. kitchen hood fire suppression system. A comprehensive fire-fighting system installed in hoods over equipment that automatically puts out a fire before it spreads.

51 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Glossary Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The governmental agency that defines and enforces safe working conditions.


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