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Few Tips from Finland and Finnish people Greeting When you meet a Finnish person for the first time, they usually introduce themselves, shake your hand.

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Presentation on theme: "Few Tips from Finland and Finnish people Greeting When you meet a Finnish person for the first time, they usually introduce themselves, shake your hand."— Presentation transcript:

1 Few Tips from Finland and Finnish people Greeting When you meet a Finnish person for the first time, they usually introduce themselves, shake your hand and look right into your eyes. In Finnish society, looking into each other’s eyes means honesty. If you kiss a Finn on their cheeks, he or she may be scared. The fact that we don’t talk a lot is part of our social culture and should not be regarded as impolite. Moreover, the Finnish language lacks long phrases and fixed expressions on politeness typical of many other languages, e.g. English.

2 Finnish way to communicate When a Finn is talking he/she does not like to be interrupted. Formal address can be applied if you are talking to somebody very much older than you, but otherwise it is seldom used. The common use of first names when addressing someone belongs to Scandinavian culture. (My first name is Seija, and I hope you use it. My family name is Lehto, you need it if you try to find my phone number. )

3 Humour Finns have a great sense of humour, although many of the jokes relate to the Finnish language (impossible to translate), love and hate relationships between two neighbouring towns/countries and, of course, blondes. Mr Bonfire….

4 Be punctual Both during their spare time and at work, the Finns are strict about time. Arrive at an appointment rather five minutes before the agreed time than five minutes late. Observe the agreed times! No smoking Smoking is normally NOT allowed inside, and Finland has some of the strictest regulations against smoking. Therefore, always remember to check if there is a sign ‘Tupakointi kielletty’, which means ‘No smoking’. (In school yards smoking is ALLWAYS forbidden!)

5 Sauna Sauna is an essential part of Finnish culture. It is absolutely worth trying. Originally, sauna was not only a place to bath but also a place where children were born and sick people cared for. It is not customary for men and women to share a sauna together unless they are family members. Most homes have their own saunas, even in blocks of flats. If a Finnish person invites you to sauna, it means that he/she has accepted you as a friend. For the Finns, being naked in a sauna is natural, but they will understand if you want to come there covered with a towel or swimming suit.

6 How To Bathe in a Finnish Sauna There is no one right way to take a sauna. Above all you should be in good company, so that you can enjoy the experience in peace. One usually goes to the sauna naked, but you can wear a bathing suit or towel if you feel more comfortable: no erotic meaning is implied. Try this first, and once you've tried it out, you can change it to suit your taste: Start by taking a shower. This helps to keep the hot room clean. Enter the sauna and sit on the upper bench. You may want to use a small towel to sit on. Sit back for a few minutes and let the heat permeate your body and open the pores of the skin. You may adjust the air moisture by throwing water on the stones of the heater. The steam will make the room feel hotter.

7 Step into the changing room to cool down, maybe take another shower. You may go back to the heat a few times, taking your time to relax and enjoy the warmth. Finally shower to clean yourself from the sweat. Allow yourself to cool and dry properly before clothing yourself. Follow the sauna with a peaceful rest and a drink. To get the most of the sauna, you will need: At least half an hour of time, preferably an hour or more, so you have ample time to relax. A large towel to dry yourself You may also want to consider these: A smaller towel to sit on A moisturising lotion for after the sauna A bathrobe to wear while cooling down

8 The temperatures in a sauna are of the order of 60 to 100 degrees Celsius. The air can be relatively dry, or water can be sprinkled over the stones to increase humidity. The air must never be completely dry, however, since it could be harmful to the respiratory system. Splashing water on the benches has a cooling effect, since the evaporating water will take heat out of the air. (at Vallinranta sauna: there are towels, bathrobes, and small towels to sit on already waiting; ladies, if you don’t want to wash your hair, please take an extra towel with you)

9 A cool, refreshing shower during or after the sauna completes your relaxation. Many Finns have saunas at their summer homes by the literally tens of thousands of lakes in Finland, and a sauna is not complete without a refreshing swim. In the winter, sauna veterans will even make a hole in the river ice and dive into the icy water (approx. 3 to 5 Celsius). Also, you should try the vihta if you ever get the possibility. (In the picture next page, sauna enthusiasts show how to use the vihta in a mock sauna during a summer festival in Kotka, Finland) More about sauna:

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