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Presentation on theme: "Menu Question 1 Question 2 Question 3 Question 4 Question 5 Question 6 Question 7 Question 8 Question 9 Question 10 Question 11 Question 12 Question 13."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Menu Question 1 Question 2 Question 3 Question 4 Question 5 Question 6 Question 7 Question 8 Question 9 Question 10 Question 11 Question 12 Question 13 Question 14 Question 15 Question 16 Question 17 MAIN MENU To Exit: Press Escape Practice Quiz Chapter 4 WISDOM

3 Menu 1. Prudence or moral wisdom is BEST defined as a. a consistent desire for the right thing. b. the ability to consistently choose those actions which result in good moral outcomes. c. proper moral vision. d. temperance.

4 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Click here for tutorial on wisdomhere Rationale: Wisdom has more to do with decision-making than motivation.

5 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: although having a strong moral vision is part of Wisdom, it is not the whole of it. Good deliberation and judgment are also part of wisdom. Click here for tutorial on wisdomhere

6 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: Although wise people are temperate, temperance is a virtue, and not part of wisdom per se. Click here for tutorial on wisdomhere

7 Menu CORRECT NextNext Question

8 Menu 2. All of the following are required for the acquisition of moral wisdom EXCEPT: a. good character; prudence seems unlikely if one is intemperate, easily angered, lustful, and otherwise lacking in virtue. b. experience; the ability to learn from mistakes and practice judgments. c. certain intellectual talents, such as insight, discernment, and good observation, all of which help one gain something worthwhile from experience. d. high IQ, and special academic talent.

9 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: good character is essential for moral wisdom. Click here for tutorial on wisdomhere

10 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: experience is essential for acquiring wisdom; the inexperienced seldom have such a characteristic. Click here for tutorial on wisdomhere

11 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: these are necessary for acquiring wisdom; one cannot learn from experience without these talents. Click here for tutorial on wisdomhere

12 Menu CORRECT NextNext Question

13 Menu 3. Moral vision is BEST defined as: a. the cumulative affect of good decisions and outcomes, leading to a habit of continuing moral success. b. a relatively well-defined sense of the good life, understood cosmically, communally, and in terms of one's own plans for life. c. one's knowledge concerning the nature of the world and the nature of human life. d. a particular end or goal of an action.

14 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Click here for tutorial on moral visionhere Rationale: This is the definition of moral competence; moral vision is one aspect of wisdom.

15 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: although such knowledge contributes to a moral vision, it does not fully define it. Click here for tutorial on moral visionhere

16 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: particular goals may be a part of a moral vision, but not the whole of it. Click here for tutorial on moral visionhere

17 Menu CORRECT NextNext Question

18 Menu 4. Which of the following would BEST describe someone with a Romantic vision: a. people who do the wrong thing are simply misguided and need to be shown the error of their ways; rather than destroy your opponent, you must learn to love them, and hope that you can transform them. There is hope that in the future those who oppose one another will be reconciled. b. There are evil forces and vicious people in the world; but you can be hopeful that good will prevail in the end. What a good person has to do is find the right path, avoid false "prophets", and work to defeat those darker forces. It will not be an easy struggle, but if you stick to the right path and prove yourself worthy, you will be rewarded and victorious in the end. c. In the end the only thing you have is your own sense of worth and self-respect. Death is the great equalizer-both virtuous or vicious will die, and there is probably nothing beyond death, or at least nothing better than life. The cosmos is not an especially friendly or hopeful place, so you cannot expect much help from those quarters. Thus, what you do in this life must be done for its own sake, must be its own reward, since there will probably be no other reward for it. Your goal in life, then, should be to prove your worth simply to prove it, and to embrace the way the world is. d. humans are weak and flawed beings-and this certainly applies to yourself as well. They are quite capable of the most atrocious things even if they are quite capable of good acts. To eke out a decent life for ourselves we must band together in such a way as to constantly check and balance one another.

19 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is a good description of a comedic or thalian vision. Click here for tutorial on moral visionhere

20 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is a good description of a tragic vision. Click here for tutorial on moral visionhere

21 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is a good description of an ironic vision. Click here for tutorial on moral visionhere

22 Menu CORRECT NextNext Question

23 Menu 5. As argued by Aristotle, and argued in the textbook, flourishing is BEST defined as: a. a psychological state characterized by contentment or sanguine temperament. b. the emotion of joy. c. a condition realized in the virtuous exercise of a number of valuable and important practices and activities in one's life. d. the achievement of status, power and wealth in one's life.

24 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere Rationale: this is more precisely a definition of happiness, which is contrasted with flourishing.

25 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: flourishing is the result of doing, and not an emotional state. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

26 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this may be one form of what is considered to be the good life, but may not include all the activities necessary for flourishing. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

27 Menu CORRECT NextNext Question

28 Menu 6. Which of the following BEST reflects the comedic or thanlian vision: a. the view of Thoreau, which suggests that there is a simple, more honest and earthy life that lies behind the striving, hypocrisy, and workaholism of most people's lives. b. the view of Martin Luther King, who envisioned a society in which division between the races was eventually overcome. This would be done not by one race conquering the other, but by the ability of both races to reach an inner sense of goodness and decency, join together in forming a better society. c. the view of Paul, the Christian apostle, who argued that Christians must strengthen themselves by means of their faith in order to combat and win against the forces of evil. d. the view of Jonathan Edwards, Puritan preacher and philosopher, who argued that human beings are not worthy of God, and it is only through his mercy that we are sustained. Without strong hand and guidance of God, human beings would fail and destroy themselves.

29 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: Thoreau expresses a satirical vision. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

30 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: Paul expresses a romantic vision. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

31 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: Edwards expresses an ironic vision. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

32 Menu CORRECT NextNext Question

33 Menu 7. Happiness, as argued in the text, is BEST defined as: a. flow. b. a psychological state characterized by contentment, joy, and/or sanguine temperament. c. a condition realized in the virtuous exercise of a number of valuable and important practices and activities in one's life. d. the achievement of status, power and wealth in one's life.

34 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: flow is a peak experience, and may not entirely describe happiness as a psychological state. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

35 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is more correctly the definition of flourishing. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

36 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is one sense of the good life; happiness is more of a psychological state. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

37 Menu CORRECT Next Next Question

38 Menu 8. The research done on happiness by Lykken, Tellegen, Edward and Carol Diener, Frank Fujita, among others, comes to which of the following conclusions: a. happiness--understood as a psychological state--is dependent upon one's successes in life, relative to income, status and marital harmony. b. happiness-understood as a psychological state-is relatively independent of education, income, professional achievement or marital status; it seems to be a genetically based (though not inheritable) neuro-chemical stochastic and thermostatic)process, that is not permanently affected by life's events. c. the happiest people are those in live in the most industrially advanced countries. d. on a whole, the wealthiest people in a society will be the happiest.

39 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: these studies show no significant correlation between these and happiness. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

40 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: these studies show no evidence for this. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

41 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: these studies show no evidence for this claim. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

42 Menu CORRECT NextNext Question

43 Menu 9. According to Aristotle which of the following BEST defines the good life for an individual, that is, constitutes flourishing: a. a life that is successful at achieving honor and recognition. b. the pursuit of pleasure that is constrained by temperance. c. a life that involves friendship. d. a life that uses virtue as a constraint and framework for the pursuit of pleasure, comfort, wealth, emotional attachment and recognition.

44 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: for Aristotle these do not constitute the essence of a flourishing life. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

45 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this more correctly describes the virtue of temperance rather than the good life. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

46 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: although friendship is essential for the good life, it does not define the whole of it. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

47 Menu CORRECT NexNext Question

48 Menu 10. Which of the following is the LEAST problematic in the pursuit of the American dream: a. such a pursuit involves an inherent contradiction, so that the pursuit of one goal may lead to the failure at another; in order to create comfort, one must work harder, which leaves less time for family relations, leading to a diminished relationship with loved ones. b. the focus on family comfort and security often diminishes the role that family members play in community affairs. c. the very things that bring enjoyment, such as electronics, may also diminish the quality of family life. d. the pursuit of the American dream causes families to become less connected with one another precisely because they are often too involved in community affairs.

49 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is one of the more serious problems. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

50 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is one of the more serious problems. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

51 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is one of the more serious problems. Click here for tutorial on the good lifehere

52 Menu CORRECT Next Question

53 Menu 11. Which of the following is the BEST description of deliberation: a. it determines the best moral means to a morally good end. b. it concerns the most efficient means to an end. c. it is another word for calculation. d. it is another word for cunning.

54 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Click here for tutorial on deliberationhere Rationale: deliberation is not the same as calculation.

55 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is more correctly the definition of calculation. Click here for tutorial on deliberationhere

56 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: deliberation and cunning are not the same thing. Click here for tutorial on deliberationhere

57 Menu CORRECT NextNext Question

58 Menu 12. Machiavelli's The Prince and Sun Tzu's The Art of War are good examples of: a. cunning or cleverness b. calculation c. deliberation d. good judgment

59 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Click here for tutorial on cunninghere Rationale: the writings of these authors are considered to be models of cunning.

60 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: the writings of these authors are considered to be models of cunning. Click here for tutorial on cunninghere

61 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: the writings of these authors are considered to be models of cunning. Click here for tutorial on cunninghere

62 Menu CORRECT NextNext Question

63 Menu 13. Which of the following is NOT true of Cicero's model of deliberation: a. the advantageous should always outweigh the honorable. b. of things that are possible one should choose the most efficient, unless it violates the honorable. c. the honorable action should be preferred to one that merely secures advantage. d. assuming that all choices are honorable, select the one that is the most advantageous to you.

64 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Click here for tutorial on deliberationhere Rationale: this is a claim which Cicero makes.

65 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is a claim which Cicero makes. Click here for tutorial on deliberationhere

66 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is a claim which Cicero makes. Click here for tutorial on deliberationhere

67 Menu CORRECT Next Next Question

68 Menu 14. Discernment is BEST described as, a. that part of deliberation which uses past experience, and the recollection of cultural wisdom, to sort out the best thing to do in a certain situation. b. that part of deliberation which involves a cognitive, affective and valuative discrimination of a particular situation, which is then used to compare and contrast this situation with others, so as to make the best decision about what to do. c. a decision to act on what one considers the best among various courses of action deliberated about. d. good moral taste.

69 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Click here for tutorial on discernmenthere Rationale: this is more correctly a definition of memory.

70 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is more correctly a definition of judgment. Click here for tutorial on discernmenthere

71 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this confuses “discerning” with “discernment.” Click here for tutorial on discernmenthere

72 Menu CORRECT NextNext Question

73 Menu 15. Foresight is BEST described as, a. that part of deliberation concerned with the possible consequences of an action that might be taken, and using an estimation of these consequences in order to determine whether the plan in mind is the best one. b. that part of deliberation which uses past experience, and the recollection of cultural wisdom, to sort out the best thing to do in a certain situation. c. that part of deliberation which involves a cognitive, affective and valuative discrimination of a particular situation, which is then used to compare and contrast this situation with others, so as to make the best decision about what to do. d. a decision to act on what one considers the best among various courses of action deliberated at a certain time.

74 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Click here for tutorial on foresighthere Rationale: this is more correctly the description of memory.

75 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is more correctly the description of discernment. Click here for tutorial on foresighthere

76 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is more correctly the description of judgment. Click here for tutorial on foresighthere

77 Menu CORRECT Next Next Question

78 Menu 16. In the context of judgment, moral dilemmas are cases where: a. one must choose between two goods, such as truth vs. loyalty, short term vs. long term pleasures, individual vs. community, or justice vs. mercy. b. one must choose between the lesser of two evils. c. one must choose between what is the right thing to do, and what is the wrong, but tempting thing to do. d. you have a "Sophie's Choice."

79 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Click here for tutorial on judgmenthere Rationale: this is an example of a tragic choice.

80 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is an example of a moral temptation. Click here for tutorial on judgmenthere

81 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is an example of a tragic choice. Click here for tutorial on judgmenthere

82 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Click here for tutorial on

83 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Click here for tutorial on

84 Menu CORRECT NextNext Question

85 Menu 17. Assuming you believe that lying is wrong, choosing between a plan than includes lying as a way of shirking responsibility and blame for an action and avoiding its consequences, and, choosing to be honest in the situation despite those consequences, would be an example of which of the following types of judgment, according to Kidder: a. moral dilemma b. moral temptation c. tragic choice d. a choice between the lesser of two evils.

86 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is the case of choosing between right and wrong, not between two rights. Click here for tutorial on judgmenthere

87 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is the case of choosing between right and wrong, not between two wrongs. Click here for tutorial on judgmenthere

88 Menu INCORRECT Try Again Rationale: this is the case of choosing between right and wrong, not between two wrongs. Click here for tutorial on judgmenthere

89 Menu CORRECT MAIN MENU To Exit: Press Escape


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