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Text analysis “In a Station of the Metro” by Ezra Pound (1916) Approaching Literary Genres p. 45 Millennium.

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Presentation on theme: "Text analysis “In a Station of the Metro” by Ezra Pound (1916) Approaching Literary Genres p. 45 Millennium."— Presentation transcript:

1 Text analysis “In a Station of the Metro” by Ezra Pound (1916) Approaching Literary Genres p. 45 Millennium

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4 FOCUS ON THE METAPHOR One of the most prominent examples of a metaphor in English literature is the “All the world's a stage” monologue from ”As You Like It” All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances; — William Shakespeare, As You Like It, This quotation contains a metaphor because the world is not literally a stage. By figuratively asserting that the world is a stage, Shakespeare uses the points of comparison between the world and a stage to convey an understanding about the mechanics of the world and the lives of the people within it. SOME FAMOUS EXAMPLES OF METAPHOR “Life’s but a walking shadow” – W. Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 5 This quotation contains another metaphor. Shakespeare here compares “life” to “a walking shadow” to communicate the idea that life is as “impalpable” as a shadow, i.e difficult to catch and understand.

5 A DEFINITION OF METAPHOR The Philosophy of Rhetoric (1937) by, I. A. Richards (an influential English literary critic) describes a metaphor as having two parts: the tenor and the vehicle. The tenor is the subject to which attributes are ascribed. The vehicle is the object whose attributes are borrowed. In the previous example, "the world" is compared to a stage, describing it with the attributes of "the stage"; "the world" is the tenor, and "a stage" is the vehicle; "men and women" is the secondary tenor, and "players" is the secondary vehicle. Ex 1 Ex 2 Common Ground: A place where individuals play a part Vehicle: A stage Tenor: The world The analogy between tenor and vehicle, i.e. the ideas they share, are called common ground Tenor: Life Common Ground: Impalpability Vehicle: shadow


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