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Role of Research Understand Public Opinion Correct Misperceptions Demonstrate Voter Support Reassure Nervous Pols Reveal Health Impact Counter Economic.

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Presentation on theme: "Role of Research Understand Public Opinion Correct Misperceptions Demonstrate Voter Support Reassure Nervous Pols Reveal Health Impact Counter Economic."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Role of Research Understand Public Opinion Correct Misperceptions Demonstrate Voter Support Reassure Nervous Pols Reveal Health Impact Counter Economic Anecdotes Generate Earned Media

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5 Total Support: 70% Total Oppose: 28% Recently, a law went into effect prohibiting smoking in all workplaces in New York state, including offices, restaurants, and bars. Would you say that you support or oppose the law? A Strong Majority of New Yorkers Support The State’s Smoke-Free Workplace Law Darker shading equals stronger intensity Total numbers are rounded New York Statewide survey of registered voters - September 2003

6 The rights of smokers to smoke inside restaurants and bars The rights of customers and employees to breathe clean air inside restaurants and bars Which one of the following do you think is more important? 6% strong 55% strong Right of smokers to smoke Voters Believe In The Right to Breathe Clean Air Inside Restaurants and Bars Right to breathe clean air Darker shading equals stronger intensity Total numbers are rounded New York Statewide survey of registered voters - September 2003

7 % strongly/somewhat agree Restaurants and bars are healthier for customers and employees now that they are smoke-free There has been a lot of talk about changing the new law, but we should give the law a chance to work before trying to weaken it People should not get too worked up about this law. It is not too much to ask for smokers to step outside a restaurant or bar when they want a cigarette 75 It’s really nice to go out and enjoy New York’s restaurants and bars without smelling like smoke when you get home 77 The media is blowing this out of proportion. There will always be a small group of people who complain about the smoke-free law, but overall the new law is working fine 70 Voters Think Restaurants and Bars are Healthier, More Enjoyable, and Have No Inclination To Change The Law New York Statewide survey of registered voters - September 2003

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10 Residents Across The State Support Connecticut’s Smoke-Free Workplace Law Recently, a law went into effect prohibiting smoking inside all workplaces in Connecticut, including offices, restaurants, and bars. Would you say that you support or oppose the law? Connecticut Statewide survey - August 2004Total numbers are rounded

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12 Total Support: 77% Total Oppose: 23% Last year, a law went into effect prohibiting smoking inside most workplaces in Delaware, including offices, restaurants, bars and casinos. Would you say that you support or oppose the law? Delaware Voters Overwhelmingly Support The State’s Smoke-Free Workplace Law Darker shading equals stronger intensity Total numbers are rounded Delaware Statewide survey of registered voters - October 2003

13 Darker shading equals stronger intensity Total numbers are rounded Candidate X supports says Delaware’s smoke-free workplace law is working and supports leaving the law as it is Candidate Y says Delaware’s smoke-free workplace law went too far and wants to change the law to allow smoking in some workplaces 66% 27% Voters Would Reject A Candidate Who Wants To Change The Smoke-Free Law Margin of more than 2-to-1 Delaware Statewide survey of registered voters - October 2003

14 Voters View Gov. Minner More Favorably Because of Her Support for the Smoke-Free Workplace Law Darker shading equals stronger intensity Total numbers are rounded 58% 23% Governor Ruth Ann Minner has been a strong supporter of Delaware’s smoke-free workplace law. Does the Governor’s support for the law make you view her more favorably or less favorably? 17% A majority of Democrats, Republicans and independents have a more favorable view of the Governor Delaware Statewide survey of registered voters - October 2003

15 Crime ApproveDisapprove The ban on smoking in restaurants and bars The Public Schools Taxes Approve Disapprove Do you approve or disapprove of the way Michael Bloomberg is handling... Quinnipiac University Survey of registered voters – October 2003 The City Budget

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17 Total numbers are rounded Maine Residents Support The Smoke-Free Workplace Law On January 1st of 2004, a law was enacted whereby all bars, taverns, lounges, and pool halls in Maine became smoke-free. Do you support or oppose this law?

18 Total numbers are rounded Over Time, Even Maine’s Smokers Support The Smoke-Free Law On January 1st of 2004, a law was enacted whereby all bars, taverns, lounges, and pool halls in Maine became smoke-free. Do you support or oppose this law?

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20 Near Universal Approval of California’s Smoke-free Workplace Law (2004) Note: “New resident” defined as Californians who moved to the state after the 1995 law went into effect. “Approval” includes “strong” approval and “somewhat” approval. Source: The 2004 Survey of California Adults on Secondhand Smoke conducted by Field Research Corporation. Prepared by: California Department of Health Services, Tobacco Control Section, January 2005.

21 Voter Support for the Smoke-Free Workplace Law New York City Survey of registered voters - March 2004 New York Yankees New York Knicks David Letterman Coney Island Hot Dog A deli cornbeef sandwich Krispy Kreme donuts Donald Trump George Steinbrenner 75% of New Yorkers Support The City’s Smoke-Free Law The Law is Even More Popular Than a Variety of New York Institutions Favorable Rating

22 March 28, 2004 Smoke ban a hit - even outpolls Yanks Lisa L. Colangelo New York Daily News What do New Yorkers like more than the Yankees or a Coney Island hot dog? The smoking ban. Or at least that's the conclusion of a poll of 500 registered voters for the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. According to the poll, 61% of people strongly support the ban on smoking in workplaces, including bars, restaurants and offices. That's up from 55% in a similar poll conducted in August. Another 14% said they "somewhat" support the ban. "Those are amazing numbers," said Josh Isay, a spokesman for the campaign. "People should know that contrary to some press reports, this law is very popular... it's a vocal minority that opposes the law." By comparison, 46% of respondents reported a "very favorable" view of the New York Yankees, and 39% were big fans of Coney Island hot dogs. And 70% of people said the rights of customers to be in a smoke-free restaurant or bar is more important than the right to smoke. Bob Zuckerman of the New York Nightlife Association questioned the validity of the results. "When you group bars and restaurants together, you get a much different result than if you just ask about bars," he said. "We continue to hear from members and even nonmembers that the smoking ban has hurt business and curtailed the bar business." About 80% of the women surveyed support the ban while only 19% opposed it. Meanwhile, 70% of men supported the ban and 29% opposed it. The poll had a margin of error of 4.5%.

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27 BEFOREBEFORE AFTERAFTER BEFOREBEFORE AFTERAFTER Carcinogen (PPAH) Levels Drop 95% Fine Particle Air Pollution (RSP) Levels Drop 90% Indoor air quality test conduced Nov. 15, 2002 and Jan. 24, 2003 to assess levels of air pollution before and after DE Clean Indoor Air Law went into effect. One casino, 5 restaurants with bars, one taproom and one pool hall were tested ng/m 3 Micrograms/m 3 24-hour NAAQS for PM 2.5 Delaware Smoke-free Law Clears The Air James Repace Delaware Study, 2003

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33 New York City “Since the law went into effect, business receipts for restaurants and bars have increased, employment has risen, virtually all establishments are complying with the law, and the number of new liquor licenses issued has increased—all signs that New York City bars and restaurants are prospering.” “The State of Smoke-Free New York City: A One-Year Review”, March 2004.

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36 Clearing the Air in New York City James McBratney, president of the Staten Island Restaurant and Tavern Association. "The crystal ball that people are looking at to project economic stability is not good enough for me." October 11, 2002 New York Daily News

37 NIGHT LIFE RISES FROM ASHES OF SMOKING BAN By KENNETH LOVETT and PERRY CHIARAMONTE The Big Apple's night life is still thriving, despite predictions it would go up in smoke because of the ban on butts, a new state study shows. The first-time study by the state Department of Taxation and Finance - a copy of which was obtained by The Post - shows that while tavern business in the city dipped the first six months after the smoking ban went into effect in March 2003, it has been rebounding steadily since. The study, which for the first time separated out the sales at bars from restaurants, also showed the smoking ban had even less of an initial impact on restaurants, where business has grown at a faster rate than at watering holes. "Certainly there was a short-term impact in the middle of 2003, but clearly since then business hasn't suffered," said state Tax and Finance spokesman Thomas Bergin. "As a matter of fact, business has improved." Many bar workers and patrons are not surprised. "We have smokers who come here that are still upset that they have to go outside, but people find a way to deal with it," said Lucie, a bartender at Milady's on Prince Street. Samir Hadjarab, manager of Red Bench Bar on Sullivan Street, added, "It was quiet for a while, but now a majority of my customers are nonsmokers." According to the state study, sales-tax revenue collected from bars dropped 5.9 percent and 7.8 percent during the first two quarters following the implementation of the city ban - the largest declines experienced since business dropped 17 percent right after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in But since September 2003, bar business has begun climbing again, whereas statewide, it has dropped or remained relatively flat since the state smoking ban went into effect July For the quarter beginning last June and ending in August, city bars and taverns reported $73.2 million in sales taxes, a healthy 3.8 percent increase over the same period in Business even increased slightly during the winter months of late 2003 and early 2004, when smokers had to get used to going outside and lighting up, despite the cold and snow. State tax officials contend that the numbers are evidence that, despite dire predictions by bar owners and pro-smoking forces, the ban has not decimated the city's bustling night-life industry. But Scott Wexler, executive director of the Empire State Restaurant and Tavern Association, said the increase in state sales taxes that were collected from bars can likely be pinned to a quarter-percent increase in the sales tax enacted by the state, as well as to establishments being forced to increase drink prices to make up for lost business. Still, many customers told The Post they are happy with the smoke-free environment. "It's more enjoyable," said Howard Glassman, 34, a nonsmoking patron at the Bleecker Street Bar. "People are pretty adaptive, and over time, they have gotten over it." Yvonne, a bartender at Tom and Jerry's on Elizabeth Street, said: "I still see a lot of smokers coming out. They go outside, and it's become a very social thing."


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