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Core Values Lt Col Larry Brockshus CAP Pamphlet 50-2(E)

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1 Core Values Lt Col Larry Brockshus CAP Pamphlet 50-2(E)
“The Little Blue Book” 1 Jan 1997 Lt Col Larry Brockshus As of: 1200 Hours 15 November 2001

2 Note to briefer Review comments in the notes section of this presentation before delivery.

3 Flowchart for CAP Units?
Is it working YES NO Don’t mess with it Did you mess With it? OOPS!!! YES NO Does anyone Else know? Can you blame Someone else? Does the Commander About it? YES YES Is this how we handle ethical decisions in JROTC? Perhaps we can provide a better guide called the Air Force Core values. It is a topic that I and the Air Force take very seriously because lapses in ethical behavior can have tragic consequences. YES NO NO NO Hide it Your Toast! Look the other way NO PROBLEM! As of: 1200 Hours 15 November 2001

4 Core Values Matter Fairchild AFB 24 June 1994 Czar 52
Let me tell you about the crash of CZAR 52. This tragic mishap was the subject of a paper by Major Tony Kern titled, “Darker Shades of Blue: A case Study in Failed Leadership” However, I want use the mishap a launching point for a discussion of the importance of our Core Values and the potential cost when they are not ignored. On the 24th of June 1994, Czar52, a B-52H assigned to the 325th Bomb Squadron , 92nd Wing, Fairchild AFB, WA, launched at approximately 1358 hrs (2PM) PDT, to practice maneuvers for an upcoming air show. The aircrew planned and briefed a profile though the Wg/CC that grossly exceeded aircraft and regulatory limitations. Upon preparing to land at the end of the practice air show profile, the crew was required to execute a “go-around” or missed approach because of another aircraft on the runway. At mid-field , Czar 52 began tight 360 degree turn at only 250 feet above the ground. Approximately ¾ of the way through the turn, the aircraft banked past 90 degrees, stalled, clipped a power line with the left wing and crashed. Impact was at 1416 hrs (2:16 PM). There were no survivors. We will come back to this tragic mishap in a few minutes…but first lets look at our Core Values. Fairchild AFB June 1994 Czar 52

5 Overview Core Value Assumptions Core Values Defined Why Core Values
Core value Continuum Living Core Values As of: 1200 Hours 15 November 2001

6 Core Values Assumptions
Core Values are not a chapel program Relevant to everyone regardless of their faith The leader sets the moral tone for the entire organization Don’t need to be a commander to be a leader Leadership from below is as important as leadership from above A culture of compromise is as likely to be the result of bad policies and programs as it is to be character flaws of our people. Assumptions The following important assumptions govern the Core Values Strategy: 1. The Core Values Strategy exists independently of and does not compete with Chapel programs. {The Core Values Strategy attempts no explanation of the origin of the Values except to say that all of us, regardless of our religious views, must recognize their functional importance and accept them for that reason. Infusing the Core Values is necessary for successful mission accomplishment.} 3. The leader of an organization is key to its moral climate. {As does the commander, so does the organization. But a commander must enlist and insist upon the help of all organizational supervisors and all assigned personnel in the effort to ensure a culture of conscience for the organization.} 4. You don't need to be a commander in order to be a leader. Leadership from below is at least as important as leadership from above in implementing the Core Values. Leaders cannot just be good; they also must be sensitive to their status as role models for their people and thus avoid the appearance of improper behavior. 5. A culture of conscience is impossible unless civilians, officers, and enlisted personnel understand, accept, internalize, and are free to follow the Core Values. Bad policy can lead people to bad choices. 7. To understand, accept, and internalize the Core Values, our people must be allowed and encouraged to engage in an extended dialogue about them and to explore the role of the values at all levels of the Air Force. 8. Our first task is to fix organizations; individual character development is possible, but it is not a goal. {If a culture of compromise exists in the Air Force, then it is more likely to be the result of bad policies and programs than it is to be symptomatic of any character flaws in our people. Therefore, long before we seek to implement a character development program, we must thoroughly evaluate and, where necessary, fix our policies, processes, and procedures.}     Assumptions (original text) 2. You don't need to be a commander in order to be a leader. 4. Leaders cannot just be good; they also must be sensitive to their status as role models for their people and thus avoid the appearance of improper behavior. 5. Leadership from below is at least as important as leadership from above in implementing the Core Values. 6. A culture of conscience is impossible unless civilians, officers, and enlisted personnel understand, accept, internalize, and are free to follow the Core Values. 8. Our first task is to fix organizations; individual character development is possible, but it is not a goal. {If a culture of compromise exists in the Air Force, then it is more likely to be the result of bad policies and programs than it is to be symptomatic of any character flaws in our people. Therefore, long before we seek to implement a character development program, we must thoroughly evaluate and, where necessary, fix our policies, processes, and procedures.}    

7 Core Value CAP Core Values (approved Winter Board, Feb 1999) Integrity
Volunteer Service Excellence Respect Air Force Core Values (published 1997) Integrity First Service Before Self Excellence In All We Do

8 What are Air Force Core Values?
"Our Core Values, Integrity first, Service before self and Excellence in all we do, set the common standard for conduct across the Air Force. These values inspire the trust which provides the unbreakable bond that unifies the force. We must practice them ourselves and expect no less from those with whom we serve." General Michael E. Ryan Chief of Staff United States Air Force As of: 1200 Hours 15 November 2001

9 What are CAP Core Values?
Well, they’re actually quite simple. These values represent a cultural commitment within Civil Air Patrol: to practice basic honesty, to give of one’s self for the betterment of humanity, to deliver top quality services, and to treat others fairly. In summary, core values require all CAP members to exemplify the highest standards of personal and professional conduct. As former Air Force Chief of Staff General Ronald Fogleman said, core values must guide our daily actions --- “even when no one else is watching.” CAP P 50-2

10 What are Air Force Core Values?
“They are the values that anchor resolve in the most difficult situations. They are the values that buttress mental and physical courage when we enter combat. In essence, they are the three pillars of professionalism that provide the foundation for the military leadership at every level.” “They provide a common ground and compass by which we can all measure our ideals and actions.” -Secretary of the Air Force Widnall As of: 1200 Hours 15 November 2001

11 CAP Core Values Integrity Volunteer Service Excellence Respect
As of: 1200 Hours 15 November 2001

12 Integrity Willingness to do the Right Thing
…even when no one is looking The Bedrock of Professionalism Integrity is the ability to hold together and properly regulate all of the elements of a personality. A person of integrity, for example, is capable of acting on convictions. A person of integrity can control impulses and appetites.

13 Moral Traits of Integrity
Courage To do right even at high personal cost Honesty Our word is our bond. Don’t “pencil-whip” readiness reports, tech data violations… Responsibility Acknowledge duties, act accordingly Openness Free flow of information…provide and seek feedback

14 Moral Traits of Integrity
Accountability Don’t shift blame… “The buck stops here.” Justice Similar acts get similar rewards/punishments Self Respect Do not bring discredit upon self Humility Sobered by awesome responsibility of task The higher the position/rank, the greater the humility

15 Service Professional Duties Take Precedence Over Personal Duties
Behaviors Rule following Do ones duty Respect for Others Place troops ahead of personal comfort Critical for an effective work environment Discipline and Self Control Anger--Refrain from public displays of anger Appetites--Sexual overtures to those you out rank; chemical abuse Religious tolerance--Religion is a matter of individual conscience Do not indulge in self–pity, discouragement, defeatism Faith in the System Avoid the view that you know better than those above you Strike a tone of confidence and forward looking optimism To lose faith in the system is to place Self before Service Anger or drinking in public leads subordinates to question the leaders ability to lead. Losing control or being drunk removes all doubt. SERVICE BEFORE SELF Service before self tells us that professional duties take precedence over personal desires. At the very least it includes the following behaviors: « Rule following. To serve is to do one's duty, and our duties are most commonly expressed through rules. While it may be the case that professionals are expected to exercise judgment in the performance of their duties, good professionals understand that rules have a reason for being, and the default position must be to follow those rules unless there is a clear, operational reason for refusing to do so. « Respect for others. Service before self tells us also that a good leader places the troops ahead of his/her personal comfort. We must always act in the certain knowledge that all persons possess a fundamental worth as human beings. « Discipline and self-control. Professionals cannot indulge themselves in self-pity, discouragement, anger, frustration, or defeatism. They have a fundamental moral obligation to the persons they lead to strike a tone of confidence and forward-looking optimism. More specifically, they are expected to exercise control in the following areas:   Anger. Military professionals and especially commanders at all echelons are expected to refrain from displays of anger that would bring discredit upon themselves and/or the Air Force.   Appetites. Those who allow their appetites to drive them to make sexual overtures to subordinates are un fit for military service. Likewise, the excessive consumption of alcohol casts doubt on an individual's fitness, and when such persons are found to be drunk and disorderly, all doubts are removed.   Religious toleration. Military professionals must remember that religious choice is a matter of individual conscience. Professionals, and especially commanders, must not take it upon themselves to change or coercively influence the religious views of subordinates. « Faith in the system. To lose faith in the system is to adopt the view that you know better than those above you in the chain of command what should or should not be done. In other words, to lose faith in the system is to place self before service. Leaders can be very influential in this regard: if a leader resists the temptation to doubt `the system', then subordinates may follow suit.

16 Service “The Air Force (and CAP) requires a high level of professional skill, …commitment, and a willingness to make personal sacrifices. Unfortunately, we’ve all seen what happens when people forget that basic tenet. Examples of careerism and self interest are present at every level, but they do the most damage when they are displayed by the leader. If the leader is unwilling to sacrifice individual goals for the good of the organization, it’s hard to convince other unit members to do so. At that point, the mission suffers, and the ripple effects can be devastating.” -Secretary Widnall Let me tell you about Darleen Druyun a senior Air Force weapons buyer. Chances are you’ve never heard of Darleen Druyun, but she’s been spending a lot of your money — your tax money. In all, Druyun’s taxpayer credit card racked up $30 billion in charges every year. She had a bigger budget than the Department of Homeland Security or the Justice Department. It was found that Boeing got preferential treatment in getting contracts because of Druyun's position as a former Air Force weapons buyer. In the biggest Pentagon scandal in 20 years, it appears that billions of dollars were doled out to the Boeing Company, as Druyun was accepting personal favors for her family. Druyun called Michael Sears, the chief financial officer at Boeing, and asked him to arrange a job for her daughter’s fiancé, Michael McKee. Boeing set up the job right away. And then, three months later, with a contract still on the table, Druyun asked for a job for her daughter, Heather. Boeing again complied In the midst of the negotiations for the next air-to-air refueling tanker, Druyun’s daughter, Heather, ed Boeing's Mike Sears and revealed that her mother was retiring from the Air Force. Now, Druyun herself was looking for a job, one that Heather told Sears "must be challenging, tough, lots of responsibility.” … “She is very interested in talking to us, but we would have to give her something that would blow her out of the water.” … “She also mentioned that Boeing has her most admired quality: honest values.” In November 2002, Druyun accepted an offer to be deputy general manager of Boeing’s missile defense systems -- with a $250,000 salary and a $50,000 signing bonus .....Michael Sears, former president of McDonnell Douglas Aerospace in St. Louis, pleaded guilty Nov to hiring Druyun, who admitted giving preferential treatment to Boeing on the 767 Tanker contract. Druyun was sentenced to nine months in prison.

17 Careerism and Self Interest?
Darleen Druyun a senior Air Force weapons buyer responsible for $30 billion of purchases every year. Plead guilty to inflating the price of a contract to favor her future employer, Boeing. Arranged jobs at Boeing for her daughter, her daughter’s fiancé, and herself at a $250,000 salary. She was sentenced to nine months in jail for corruption. Darleen Druyun Let me tell you about Darleen Druyun a senior Air Force weapons buyer. Chances are you’ve never heard of Darleen Druyun, but she’s been spending a lot of your money — your tax money. In all, Druyun’s taxpayer credit card racked up $30 billion in charges every year. She had a bigger budget than the Department of Homeland Security or the Justice Department. It was found that Boeing got preferential treatment in getting contracts because of Druyun's position as a former Air Force weapons buyer. In the biggest Pentagon scandal in 20 years, it appears that billions of dollars were doled out to the Boeing Company, as Druyun was accepting personal favors for her family. Druyun called Michael Sears, the chief financial officer at Boeing, and asked him to arrange a job for her daughter’s fiancé, Michael McKee. Boeing set up the job right away. And then, three months later, with a contract still on the table, Druyun asked for a job for her daughter, Heather. Boeing again complied In the midst of the negotiations for the next air-to-air refueling tanker, Druyun’s daughter, Heather, ed Boeing's Mike Sears and revealed that her mother was retiring from the Air Force. Now, Druyun herself was looking for a job, one that Heather told Sears "must be challenging, tough, lots of responsibility.” … “She is very interested in talking to us, but we would have to give her something that would blow her out of the water.” In November 2002, Druyun accepted an offer to be deputy general manager of Boeing’s missile defense systems -- with a $250,000 salary and a $50,000 signing bonus .....Michael Sears, former president of McDonnell Douglas Aerospace in St. Louis, pleaded guilty Nov to hiring Druyun, who admitted giving preferential treatment to Boeing on the 767 Tanker contract. Druyun was sentenced to nine months in prison.

18 Servant "Chief Gary Pfingston was an American who always put his country first, a father who always put his family first, and a simply great NCO who always put the Air Force first. I don't know how he did this, how he managed to put three things first, seeming to violate the laws of physics. Maybe he was able to do it because he never paid any attention to himself, and that made a lot of room for the things he loved.” General McPeak Chief of Staff United States Air Force Chief Pfingston recently passed away. He was the 10th Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force and held this highest Air Force enlisted position during Desert Storm, the first Gulf War. He served as Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force from Aug 1990 to Octr 1994. Chief Gary Pfingston As of: 1200 Hours 15 November 2001

19 Excellence Sustained passion for continuous improvement and innovation
Product/Service Excellence Personal Excellence Complete professional training Stay physically and mentally fit Community Excellence (Members of an organization working together to reach a common goal) Trust and Mutual Respect Individuals have fundamental worth. Discriminate on performance only Give the Benefit of the Doubt Innocent until proven guilty 3) EXCELLENCE IN ALL WE DO Excellence in all we do directs us to develop a sustained passion for continuous improvement and innovation that will propel the Air Force into a long-term, upward spiral of accomplishment and performance. True quality is embodied in the actions of Air Force people who take decisive steps to improve processes and products; who capitalize on quality as a leverage tool to enhance products, achieve savings, and improve customer service; and who exemplify our core values of integrity first, service before self, and excellence in all we do. General Fogleman« Product/service excellence. We must focus on providing services and generating products that fully respond to customer wants and anticipate customer needs, and we must do so within the boundaries established by the tax paying public. « Personal excellence. Military professionals must seek out and complete professional military education, stay in physical and mental shape, and continue to refresh their general educational backgrounds. « Community excellence. Community excellence is achieved when the members of an organization can work together to successfully reach a common goal in an atmosphere free of fear that preserves individual self-worth. Some of the factors influencing interpersonal excellence are:   Mutual respect. Genuine respect involves viewing another person as an individual of fundamental worth. Obviously, this means that a person is never judged on the basis of his/her possession of an attribute that places him or her in some racial, ethnic, economic, or gender-based category.   Benefit of the doubt. Working hand in glove with mutual respect is that attitude which says that all co workers are 'innocent until proven guilty'. Before rushing to judgment about a person or his/her behavior, it is important to have the whole story.

20 Excellence Resource Excellence Human Resource Excellence
Cradle to Grave Resource Management Material Resource Excellence Ensure that requested equipment is mission essential Human Resource Excellence Recruit, Train, Promote those we actual need and can do the job Promote based on merit and ability only…not just your friends Operational Excellence Internal/External (3) EXCELLENCE IN ALL WE DO Excellence in all we do directs us to develop a sustained passion for continuous improvement and innovation that will propel the Air Force into a long-term, upward spiral of accomplishment and performance. True quality is embodied in the actions of Air Force people who take decisive steps to improve processes and products; who capitalize on quality as a leverage tool to enhance products, achieve savings, and improve customer service; and who exemplify our core values of integrity first, service before self, and excellence in all we do. General Fogleman« Product/service excellence. We must focus on providing services and generating products that fully respond to customer wants and anticipate customer needs, and we must do so within the boundaries established by the tax paying public. « Personal excellence. Military professionals must seek out and complete professional military education, stay in physical and mental shape, and continue to refresh their general educational backgrounds. « Community excellence. Community excellence is achieved when the members of an organization can work together to successfully reach a common goal in an atmosphere free of fear that preserves individual self-worth. Some of the factors influencing interpersonal excellence are:   Mutual respect. Genuine respect involves viewing another person as an individual of fundamental worth. Obviously, this means that a person is never judged on the basis of his/her possession of an attribute that places him or her in some racial, ethnic, economic, or gender-based category.   Benefit of the doubt. Working hand in glove with mutual respect is that attitude which says that all co workers are 'innocent until proven guilty'. Before rushing to judgment about a person or his/her behavior, it is important to have the whole story. « Resources excellence. Excellence in all we do also demands that we aggressively implement policies to en sure the best possible cradle-to-grave management of resources.   Material resources excellence. Military professionals have an obligation to ensure that all of the equipment and property they ask for is mission essential. This means that residual funds at the end of the year should not be used to purchase 'nice to have' add-ons.   Human resources excellence. Human resources excellence means that we recruit, train, promote, and retain those who can do the best job for us. « Operations excellence. There are two kinds of operations excellence internal and external.   Excellence of internal operations. This form of excellence pertains to the way we do business internal to the Air Force from the unit level to Headquarters Air Force. It involves respect on the unit level and a total commitment to maximizing the Air Force team effort.   Excellence of external operations. This form of excellence pertains to the way in which we treat the world around us as we conduct our operations. In peacetime, for example, we must be sensitive to the rules governing environmental pollution, and in war time we are required to obey the laws of war.  

21 Excellence Autograph your work with excellence
Didn’t your mother tell you, “If it is worth doing, it is worth doing well.” Is 99% good enough? 12 newborns would be given to the wrong parents each day 18,000 pieces of mail would be mishandled 315 entries in Webster’s Dictionary would be misspelled 219 pacemaker operations would be incorrect EXCELLENCE IN ALL WE DO AUTOGRAPH YOUR WORK WITH EXCELLENCE My mother used to say, "If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing well." I am not talking about perfectionism, for "perfect" is found only in the dictionary. Those who think a thing must be perfect before it is finished will accomplish very little. I have yet to write a perfect letter, prepare a perfect meal or give a perfect speech. (I admit, I've made a perfect fool of myself at times, but then I wasn't trying! Most of the time, however, my mother's admonition was on the mark. If a thing is worthy of my time, it is worthy of my best time. In some of his speeches, Louis T. Rader relates that many top executives feel that a 99 percent effort is good enough. But here is the eye opener - if this figure (99 percent good enough) were converted into our daily non-industrial life, it means that more than 30,000 babies would be accidentally dropped by doctors and nurses each year. Electricity would be off for fifteen minutes every day. Others have calculated that 99 percent good enough means that: 12 newborns will be given to the wrong parents daily; 114,500 mismatched pairs of shoes will be shipped each year; 18,322 pieces of mail will be mishandled per hour; 2.5 million books will be shipped with the wrong cover; two planes will crash daily at Chicago's O'Hare airport; 315 entries in Webster's Dictionary will be misspelled; and 291 pacemaker operations will be performed incorrectly. Sometimes 99 percent really isn't good enough. Texas' first African-American congresswoman, Barbara Jordon, once said, "Each day you have to look into the mirror and say to yourself, 'I'm going to be the best I can no matter what it takes.'" She never said, "I will be the best." She said, "I will be the best I can." And it was because of her desire to be her best ... that she became one of our best. Perfect is only found in the dictionary, but doing and being one's best is an important part of a happy and fulfilled life. "Every job is a self-portrait of the person who did it," Jessica Guidobono reminds us. " Autograph your work with excellence." 21 21

22 Are you ready to be Excellent??
“It’s not the will to win that matters…everyone has that. It’s the will to prepare to win that matters” Paul “Bear” Bryant EXCELLENCE IN ALL WE DO It’s not the will to win that matters…everyone has that. It’s the will to prepare to win that matters Paul “Bear” Bryant 22 22

23 Excellence -- Are You Prepared to Make A Difference?
“To every person, there comes in their lifetime that special moment when they are tapped on the shoulder and offered that chance to do a very special thing, unique to them and fitted to their talents. What a tragedy if that moment finds them unprepared and unqualified for the work that would be their finest hour.” ~ Winston Churchill To every person, there comes in their lifetime that special moment when they are tapped on the shoulder and offered that chance to do a very special thing, unique to them and fitted to their talents. What a tragedy if that moment finds them unprepared and unqualified for the work that would be their finest hour.” ~ Winston Churchill transistion Now that we have looked a the AF Core Values let us look again at the pilot of Czar 52. How were the Core Values exempllified. 23 23

24 Respect CAP members come from all walks of life. Therefore, it is extremely important that members treat each other with fairness and dignity, and work together as a team. To do otherwise would seriously impair CAP’s capability to accomplish the mission.

25 The Devastating Impact of Failed Core Values
The Crash of a Czar 52, a B-52 at Fairchild AFB on 24 June 1994 Darker Shades of Blue: A Case Study of Failed Leadership By Maj Tony Kern The players Lt Col “Bud” Holland (AC) Lt Col Mark McGeehan (CP) Wing Staff This tragic mishap was the subject of a paper by major Tony Kern titled, “Darker Shades of Blue: A case Study in Failed Leadership” However I want use the mishap a launch point of the importance of Air Force Core Values and the potential cost when they are not followed. On the 24th of June 1994, Czar52, a B-52H assigned to the 325th Bomb Squadron , 92nd Wing, Fairchild AFB, WA, launched at approximately 1358 hrs (PDT), to practice maneuvers for an upcoming air show. The aircrew planned and briefed a profile though the Wg/CC that grossly exceeded aircraft and regulatory limitations. Upon preparing to land at the end of the practice air show profile, the crew was required to execute a “go-around” or missed approach because of another aircraft on the runway. At mid-field , Czar 52 began tight 360 degree turn at only 250 feet above the ground. Approximately ¾ of the way through the turn, the aircraft banked past 90 degrees, stalled, clipped a power line with the left wing and crashed. Impact was at 1416 hrs. There were no survivors. Many aviators from the base reported that rules and regulations were bent on some occasions and some pilots seem to be “Teflon coated” View of Bud Holland by his supervisors: “Bud is as good a B-52 aviator as I have seen.” Bud was probably the best B-52 pilot I know in the Wing and probably one of the best if not the best in the command.” View of Jr Officers: “There was already some talk of “Bub” maybe trying some ridiculous maneuvers ..his life time goal was to roll the B-52.” “I was thinking that he was going to try something again, ridiculous maybe, at this air show and possibly kill thousands of people.” “I’m not going to fly with him, he is dangerous” “Lt Col Holland broke regulations or exceeded limits.. virtually every time he flew.” “Bud” Holland’s flying history before the crash: May 91 Fairchild Air show. Exceeded pitch and roll limits, flew over the crowd in violation of FAA regs. No action was taken July 91 Squadron CoC: Passes as low as ft. Performed a wing over in violation of sideslip limits. Senior staff watched but did nothing but debrief Holland May 92 Air show Excessive pitch bank and a then a wingover. He was given a verbal reprimand but no documentation April 93, Global power mission. Flew close visual formation and sent crew member back to video bomb drop, both were violations. DO said he did not what to know anything about the video. Aug 93 Fairchild Air show; Same maneuvers ad before. No action was taken Mar 94 on the bomb Range. Photographed at less than 30 ft (500 ft was the established minimum) A crew member estimated the crossed the ridge at 3 ft, and that the aircraft would have impacted if the CP did not pull back on the yoke. The photographer stopped filming because he thought the aircraft was going to impact. Sq CC McGeehan recommended Holland’s grounding to the DO. The DO verbally reprimanded Holland but let him continue to fly. McGeehan made the decision to restrict his crews from flying with Holland unless he was on the aircraft. (He was true to his word…) 25 25

26 “Bud” Holland’s Flight History
Wing leadership comments: “As good a I’ve seen” “The best pilot I know” View of Jr. Officers: “I’m not flying with him” “He broke regulations every time he flew” May 91 Fairchild Air Show July 91 Squadron CoC May 92 Fairchild Air Show April 93 Global Power Mission Aug 93 Fairchild Air Show Mar 94 on the Bomb Range I said we would get back to the crash of Czar 52. Lets look at the actions of the players relatet to this crash starting with the Aircraft commander, LtCol bud Holland. Prior to the tragic crash, many aviators from the base reported that rules and regulations were bent on some occasions and some pilots seem to be “Teflon coated.” They were talking about Lt Col Bud Holland the aircraft commander of Czar 52 View of Bud Holland by his supervisors: “Bud is as good a B-52 aviator as I have seen.” “Bud was probably the best B-52 pilot I know in the Wing and probably one of the best, if not the best in the command.” View of Jr Officers: “There was already some talk of “Bub” maybe trying some ridiculous maneuvers ..his life time goal was to roll the B-52.” “I was thinking that he was going to try something again, ridiculous maybe, at this air show and possibly kill thousands of people.” “I’m not going to fly with him, he is dangerous” “Lt Col Holland broke regulations or exceeded limits.. virtually every time he flew.” “Bud” Holland’s flying history before the crash: May 91 Fairchild Air show. Exceeded pitch and roll limits, flew over the crowd in violation of FAA regs. No action was taken July 91 Squadron CoC: Passes as low as ft. Wing over in violation of sideslip limits. Senior staff watched but did nothing but debrief Holland May 92 Air show. Excessive pitch bank and a then a wingover. Verbal reprimand but no documentation April 93, Global power mission. Flew close visual formation and sent crew member back to video bomb drop, both were violations. DO said he did not what to know anything about the video. Aug 93 Fairchild Air show; Same maneuvers ad before. No action was taken Mar 94 on the bomb Range. Photographed at less than 30 ft (500 ft was the established minimum) A crew member estimated the crossed the ridge at 3 ft, and that the aircraft would have impacted if the CP did not pull back on the yoke. The photographer stopped filming because he thought the aircraft was going to impact. Upon learning of the incident, Sq CC McGeehan recommended to the DO that Holland be grounding. The DO verbally reprimanded Holland but let him continue to fly. McGeehan made the decision to restrict his crews from flying with Holland unless he was on the aircraft. (He was true to his word…) Czar 52 Fairchild AFB June 1994

27 Pilots of Czar 52 Living Core Values?
Lt Col “Bud” Holland Exceeded command and aircraft design limits on almost every flight …80 degrees nose high at air shows As chief of Wing Standardization he knew what the regulations said Told the DO that he was just trying to a “demonstrate aircraft capabilities to the more junior crewmembers” …promised not to do it again Lt Col Mark McGeehan Took evidence of a “Bud” Holland’s recklessness to wing leadership. Holland was respected by Wing leadership and was not under McGeehan’s command He requested Holland be grounded. Request denied. Ordered no pilot under his command to fly Holland If a copilot was needed, he would go himself…he was true to his word

28 Leadership’s Core Values?
How about the Group and Wing leadership? Verbally reprimanded but did not document, therefore following leadership were ignorant and continued to select Holland to fly air shows. When presented evidence of flying violations from a video taken on Holland’s airplane… ADO advised, "I would not show any of this" DO allegedly responded, "Okay, I don't want to know anything about that video -- I don't care.” As of: 1200 Hours 15 November 2001

29 Results Killed during the crash of Czar 52 Lt Col “Bud” Holland (AC)
Chief of Wing Stan Eval Mr. Air Show Many documented flagrant violations of flight discipline Lt Col Mark McGeehan (CP) Bomb Squadron CC Attempted, but unable to ground Holland for his many violations Flew with Holland so others from his squadron would not have to Attempted ejection My SOS classmate and my friend Col Robert Wolff (Safety Obs) “Fini-flight” His family watched, ready with champagne to toast the end of a great flying career Lt Col Ken Huston (RN) This tragic mishap was the subject of a paper by major Tony Kern titled, “Darker Shades of Blue: A case Study in Failed Leadership” However I want use the mishap a launch point of the importance of Air Force Core Values and the potential cost when they are not followed. On the 24th of June 1994, Czar52, a B-52H assigned to the 325th Bomb Squadron , 92nd Wing, Fairchild AFB, WA, launched at approximately 1358 hrs (PDT), to practice maneuvers for an upcoming air show. The aircrew planned and briefed a profile though the Wg/CC that grossly exceeded aircraft and regulatory limitations. Upon preparing to land at the end of the practice air show profile, the crew was required to execute a “go-around” or missed approach because of another aircraft on the runway. At mid-field , Czar 52 began tight 360 degree turn at only 250 feet above the ground. Approximately ¾ of the way through the turn, the aircraft banked past 90 degrees, stalled, clipped a power line with the left wing and crashed. Impact was at 1416 hrs. There were no survivors. Many aviators from the base reported that rules and regulations were bent on some occasions and some pilots seem to be “Teflon coated” View of Bud Holland by his supervisors: “Bud is as good a B-52 aviator as I have seen.” Bud was probably the best B-52 pilot I know in the Wing and probably one of the best if not the best in the command.” View of Jr Officers: “There was already some talk of “Bub” maybe trying some ridiculous maneuvers ..his life time goal was to roll the B-52.” “I was thinking that he was going to try something again, ridiculous maybe, at this air show and possibly kill thousands of people.” “I’m not going to fly with him, he is dangerous” “Lt Col Holland broke regulations or exceeded limits.. virtually every time he flew.” “Bud” Holland’s flying history before the crash: May 91 Fairchild Air show. Exceeded pitch and roll limits, flew over the crowd in violation of FAA regs. No action was taken July 91 Squadron CoC: Passes as low as ft. Performed a wing over in violation of sideslip limits. Senior staff watched but did nothing but debrief Holland May 92 Air show Excessive pitch bank and a then a wingover. He was given a verbal reprimand but no documentation April 93, Global power mission. Flew close visual formation and sent crew member back to video bomb drop, both were violations. DO said he did not what to know anything about the video. Aug 93 Fairchild Air show; Same maneuvers ad before. No action was taken Mar 94 on the bomb Range. Photographed at less than 30 ft (500 ft was the established minimum) A crew member estimated the crossed the ridge at 3 ft, and that the aircraft would have impacted if the CP did not pull back on the yoke. The photographer stopped filming because he thought the aircraft was going to impact. Sq CC McGeehan recommended Holland’s grounding to the DO. The DO verbally reprimanded Holland but let him continue to fly. McGeehan made the decision to restrict his crews from flying with Holland unless he was on the aircraft. (He was true to his word…) Darker Shades of Blue: A Case Study of Failed Leadership, Maj Tony Kern 29 29

30 Why Core Values? Core Values are the price of admission to the Air Force (and CAP) itself Instill confidence Earn lasting respect Create willing followers Anchor in the most difficult times Provide a common compass Help get a fix on the ethical climate of the organization Provide a slap in the face in a climate of ethical corrosion As of: 1200 Hours 15 November 2001

31 The Core Values Continuum
Every level has to “Walk the Talk” What happens if a supervisor tells his new CAP member, "Core Values? That's what they taught you as a cadet? Now, let me tell you how we really do it." It won't do any good to educate our people in the Core Values if leaders don't also live them. As of: 1200 Hours 15 November 2001

32 The Core Values Continuum
We need to fix our organizations first! A culture of compromise is as likely to be the result of bad policies and programs as it is to be character flaws of our people. Core Values must be “operationalized” in to the daily business of the organization As of: 1200 Hours 15 November 2001

33 Living Core Values (Ethics in action)
The three “O”s Owing (or why live the Core Values) Capt Miller, Private Ryan, “Earn this…earn it,” make your life count Ethics based on “me-ism” or “egotism” cannot function Without a sense owing, we are little more that self indulgent children The core of “Service Before Self” Ordering Unit, Corps (AF), God, Country or God, Country, Corps (AF), Unit? “U.S.” comes before “Air Force” on our BDUs Ought to do (understanding what you ought to do) Integrity First…doing the right thing when no one is watching Blind obedience to orders? Only follow lawful orders Owing; The example from the movie “Saving Private Ryan” Private Ryan asked Capt Miller what he could do to pay him back for sacrificing his life. “Earn this..Earn it. Ordering: General Douglas MacArthur's Farewell Speech to West Point in 1962, ended with the word that would reflect his parting thoughts in life, “the corps, the corps, the corps” Similarly in the movie “A few good men” a Marine lance corporal tells his lawyers that the "code" is based upon "unit, Corps, God, country." I contend that both of these are completely incorrect. Lets say that our Marine lance corporal from the movie “A few good men” attended OCS and has now risen to the rank of, say, lieutenant colonel. He is about to appear before a Congressional committee to testify about a weapons system which still has a kink or two-but one which the Marine Corps may really want. Is it all right for him to withhold crucial information about that weapons system from the committee which might terminate it? If the corps has priority over country it would be acceptable. Ought to do: Blind obedience can be a problem is the orders are not given by an ethical person. In the Air Force you are not only protected from not following unlawful orders but you can be punished under the UCMJ for following an unlawful order. Based on article by Dr James H Toner, Aerospace Power Journal 2003

34 Living Core Values (Ethics in action)
The three “R”s Rules Ethics is more than rules Rules tend to be mini courses in ethics We cannot invent clear rules that govern every circumstance Unethical people can write and apply rules “Integrity First” is more than just a Rule Results Does the ends justify the means? Realities Lying is wrong…Should you lie to a WWII Nazi if you are hiding a Jew in the basement? Rules: Much of what passes for ethical education amounts to teaching rules. However, we can not invent rules that cover every circumstance. Rules are important (rules of engagement) but we can never create military ethics based on rules. Sometimes unethical people write rules or abuse rules. Why do lawyers get such a bad reputation? Results: Is the results, the bottom line what matters? Is it alright to cheat on an inspection or report, just to get a good good OPR, get promoted, pass the inspection or help the wing look good; or even winning the battle at any cost, regardless of the price or the suffering or the deaths involved?? The ends do not always justify the means. Realities: It is wrong to lie, however, there are exceptions based on realities. The Jew hiding in the basement during WWII is an example. Based on article by Dr James H Toner, Aerospace Power Journal 2003

35 Living Core Values (Ethics in action)
The three “D”s Discern Educate ourselves in the light of truth Truth should not be an opinion…opinions are self referencing Be leery of loyalty and sincerity Declare Speak up for the truth Do Act on the truth Do what we say Everyone has values, not everyone has virtue which is the desire to do what “ought” to be done, and then do it Cornerstone of “Excellence” and “Service” Based on article by Dr James H Toner, Aerospace Power Journal 2003 Discern: Decide what is true. Then cut off and reject alternatives not worth of what we “ought” to do. Seek truth and cut off distortion, prejudice, and self-promotion. Despite what today's world tells us, “truth” is not a name given to a list of options. Be leary of loyalty. Loyalty only to yourself, or your group is dangerous. Loyalty must flow from an ordered sense of obligation: God, county, Air Force, Unit, Self. Be suspicious of sincerity, a person who seems sincere may be a wolf in sheep's clothing. Act on the truth: I was struck by the cover of a brochure a few years ago. It said, “My greatest fear is that at the end of my life, I will look back and wonder is I made a difference.” I believe that if during your life, you struggle to: Discern the Truth, Declare the Truth, and then Act on the Truth, you have nothing to fear.

36 Living Core Values Watch your thoughts, they become your words
Watch your words, they become your actions Watch your actions, they become your habits Watch your habits, they become character Watch your character, it becomes your destiny Motto of Metropolitan Milwaukee YMCA Every time we act, we become what we have done. In a sense, I become what I do, and then I do what I have become.

37 Core Values w/o Burnout
Be grateful for your talents You have been put in a position of responsibility because of your God given abilities. Many other were not so blessed. Take care of family No one said, “I spent to much time with my children.” Thank them for making your life worth while Take care of yourself Exercise, eat right, see the Doc when needed Learn to laugh at yourself “Jerk” is not in the job description You will make mistakes…Its OK, that is how we learn Have fun and smile…“Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy” -Ben Franklin

38 Core Values Integrity Volunteer Service Excellence Respect

39 Core Values Matter       "When we think of those who went before us, we should do so with humility, respecting their great personal sacrifice. When we honor our heritage and those with whom we share a common bond and purpose, we are all enriched, and our lives are made a little more worth living.“ An article written by Lt Col McGeehan and published 14 days before his death Lt Col McGeehan Born Jan Died Jun 1994

40 Core Values Matter “Every time we act, we become what we have done. In a sense, I become what I do, and then I do what I have become.” “Bud” Holland acted… Lt Col McGeehan acted… How do you and I act?

41 Core Values “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands in times of challenge and controversy” -Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. As of: 1200 Hours 15 November 2001

42 “The Little Blue Book” 1 Jan 1997
CAP P 50-2 (E) 2 July 2000 Air Force Core Values “The Little Blue Book” 1 Jan 1997 Questions?


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