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Big Question: How can we understand and appreciate our cultural differences? Author: Lensey Namioka Genre: Realistic Fiction.

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Presentation on theme: "Big Question: How can we understand and appreciate our cultural differences? Author: Lensey Namioka Genre: Realistic Fiction."— Presentation transcript:

1 Big Question: How can we understand and appreciate our cultural differences? Author: Lensey Namioka Genre: Realistic Fiction

2 Small Group Small Group Timer Timer

3 Review Games Story Sort Story Sort Story Sort Story Sort VocabularyWords Vocabulary Words: Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words

4 Spelling Words Easily Confused Words

5 proceed precede advise advice formerly formally further farther personal personnel immigrate emigrate college collage descent dissent persecution prosecution envelope envelop complimentary complementary eminent imminent liable libel

6 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Big Question: How can we understand and appreciate our cultural differences? Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

7 Vocabulary Words disgraced progress promoted relish retreat revolting unison consumption etiquette impolite embarrassed honor rude Vocabulary Words More Words to Know

8 Monday Question of the Day How can we understand and appreciate our cultural differences?

9 Today we will learn about: Build Concepts Compare and Contrast Visualize Build Background Vocabulary Fluency: Tone of Voice Grammar: Commas Spelling: Easily Confused Words Customs

10 Fluency Tone of Voice

11 Fluency: Tone of Voice Listen as I read “Yangs’ Thanksgiving.” As I read, notice how I use different tones of voice to express displeasure, embarrassment, and other emotions. Be ready to answer questions after I finish.

12 Fluency: Tone of Voice How do American and Chinese customs concerning whom to serve first at dinner differ? How do American and Chinese attitudes toward old age differ?

13 Concept Vocabulary embarrassed – uneasy and ashamed honor – virtue; privilege; source of credit rude – with bad manners; impolite

14 Concept Vocabulary (To add information to the graphic organizer, click on end show, type in your new information, and save your changes.)

15 Build Concept Vocabulary Build Concept Vocabulary embarrassed, honor, rude How We Feel Why We Keep Them Customs

16 Compare and Contrast, Visualize Turn to Page

17 Build Background Build Background Identify the elements that make up a culture. Culture

18 Prior Knowledge This week’s audio explores Chinese table etiquette. After you listen, we will discuss the similarities and differences between Chinese table etiquette and our table etiquette.

19 Vocabulary Words

20 disgraced – to have caused a loss of honor or respect progress – an advance or growth; development; improvement promoted – raised in rank, condition of importance relish – a side dish to add flavor to food

21 Vocabulary Words retreat – the act of withdrawing revolting – disgusting; repulsive unison – together; as one

22 More Words to Know consumption – the process of using up etiquette – the customary rules of behavior in a society impolite – not polite; having or showing bad manners; rude

23 GrammarCommas

24 the lin family needed advise on american customs The Lin family needed advice on American customs. mrs gleason whom is megs mother set at the table Mrs. Gleason, who is Meg’s mother, sat at the table.

25 Commas “Do try some of the celery, Mrs. Lin,” she said. Commas set off elements in a sentence to make writing clear. In this sentence, commas set off a noun of direct address and separate the quotation from the rest of the sentence.

26 Commas Commas are used in compound sentences, after the greeting and closing in a letter, and in series of three or more words, phrases, or sentences. Here are other uses of commas:

27 Commas After an introductory word or phrase, such as well, yes, or by the way: By the way, I want to stop at the store before I come home. To set off a noun of direct address: Mrs. Lin, please try the celery. I asked you, Max, to come with us.

28 Commas After a dependent clause at the beginning of a sentence: Because he was shy, Tom was uncomfortable meeting new people. Before and/or after an appositive— a noun or noun phrase describing another noun: The waiter, a refined gentlemen, wore a tuxedo.

29 Commas Before and after interrupting words or phrases: Prawns, as you may know, are shrimp. Between a day of the week and a month and between a date and a year: The party is Saturday, June 1. Their wedding was on December 12, 2007.

30 Commas Between the street address and the city and between the city and the state in an address. Do not use a comma before the ZIP code: 99 North High, Beliot, WI 53511

31 Commas Add commas where they are needed. Saturday September 6 Saturday, September 6 Dear Meg Dear Meg, O’Fallon Illinois O’Fallon, Illinois 62269

32 Commas Add commas where they are needed. Meg how are you? Meg, how are you? This summer by the way we will go to China for a month. This summer, by the way, we will go to China for a month.

33 Commas Add commas where they are needed. Mrs. Gleason may we go out for dinner? Mrs. Gleason, may we go out for dinner? Mother took me shopping for new jeans school supplies and shoes Mother took me shopping for new jeans, school supplies, and shoes.

34 Commas Add commas where they are needed. Because Mom took the car to work Dad and I rode the bus. Because Mom took the car to work, Dad and I rode the bus. My father a very intelligent man is an engineer. My father, a very intelligent man, is an engineer.

35 Commas Add commas where they are needed. When he was sixteen my brother tried out for the baseball team. When he was sixteen, my brother tried out for the baseball team. We lived at 111 Oak Street Lansing Michigan. We lived at 111 Oak Street, Lansing, Michigan.

36 Commas Add commas where they are needed. Sir, may I have another napkin please? Sir, may I have another napkin, please?

37 Spelling Words Easily Confused Words

38 proceed precede advise advice formerly formally further farther personal personnel immigrate emigrate college collage descent dissent persecution prosecution envelope envelop complimentary complementary eminent imminent liable libel

39 Tuesday Question of the Day What kind of attitude does Meg seem to have toward cultural differences?

40 Today we will learn about: Context Clues Compare and Contrast Visualize Draw Conclusions Vocabulary Fluency: Echo Reading Grammar: Commas Spelling: Easily Confused Words Social Studies: Chopsticks Social Studies: Chinese Immigration Customs

41 Vocabulary Strategy: Context Clues Turn to Page

42 The All-American Slurp Turn to Page

43 Fluency Echo Reading

44 Fluency: Echo Reading Turn to page 714, paragraphs 1-3. As I read, notice how my voice changes to express the girl’s emotional pain and the mother’s concern. We will practice as a class doing three echo readings.

45 GrammarCommas

46 when his english improved mr lin was promoted by the personal manager When his English improved, Mr. Lin was promoted by the personnel manager. the smells of mrs lins chinese dinner would envelope the room The smells of Mrs. Lin’s Chinese dinner would envelop the room.

47 Commas Commas are used to set off elements in sentences, such as introductory words or phrases, nouns of direct address, appositives, and interrupting words or phrases. Commas tell readers where to pause. They also make writing easier to read.

48 Spelling Words Easily Confused Words

49 proceed precede advise advice formerly formally further farther personal personnel immigrate emigrate college collage descent dissent persecution prosecution envelope envelop complimentary complementary eminent imminent liable libel

50 Wednesday Question of the Day What do you learn about Chinese eating customs from the dinner at the Lins’ house?

51 Today we will learn about: Compare and Contrast Visualize Draw Conclusions Vocabulary Fluency: Tone of Voice Grammar: Commas Spelling: Easily Confused Words Social Studies: Chinese Americans Customs

52 The All-American Slurp Turn to Page

53 Fluency Tone of Voice

54 Fluency: Tone of Voice Turn to page 716, paragraphs 1-2. As I read, notice how my voice changes at exclamation points. Now we will practice together as a class by doing three echo readings.

55 GrammarCommas

56 mrs lin sended her daughter to the store to buy flower for potstickers Mrs. Lin sent her daughter to the store to buy flour for potstickers. mother didnt never want myself to wear jeans Mother didn’t want me to wear jeans.

57 Commas Commas are used to set off elements in sentences, such as introductory words or phrases, nouns of direct address, appositives, and interrupting words or phrases. Commas tell readers where to pause. They also make writing easier to read.

58 Commas Commas separate items in lists and set off words and phrases that interrupt the main flow of a sentence. Use commas in your writing to make your ideas clear. Unclear: George she plans to serve spaghetti fruit salad and rolls. Clear: George, she plans to serve spaghetti, fruit salad, and rolls.

59 Commas Review something you have written to see if you can improve it by adding commas to make your ideas clear.

60 Spelling Words Easily Confused Words

61 proceed precede advise advice formerly formally further farther personal personnel immigrate emigrate college collage descent dissent persecution prosecution envelope envelop complimentary complementary eminent imminent liable libel

62 Thursday Question of the Day Why is the way we eat our food, and the foods we eat, considered part of our history and cultural identity?

63 Today we will learn about: Expository Nonfiction Reading Across Texts Content-Area Vocabulary Fluency: Partner Reading Grammar: Commas Spelling: Easily Confused Words Social Studies: Create a Guide

64 “The Evolution of Eating Utensils” Turn to Page

65 Fluency Partner Reading

66 Fluency: Partner Reading Turn to page 716, paragraphs 1-2. Read this three times with a partner. Be sure to use your tone of voice to express emotion and offer each other feedback.

67 GrammarCommas

68 the lins immigrated from china and became emigrants in the united states The Lins emigrated from China and became immigrants in the United States. when I came to the united states I discovered a wonderful food pizza When I came to the United States, I discovered a wonderful food, pizza.

69 Commas Commas are used to set off elements in sentences, such as introductory words or phrases, nouns of direct address, appositives, and interrupting words or phrases. Commas tell readers where to pause. They also make writing easier to read.

70 Commas Test Tip: Do not use commas where they are not needed. No: We loved the chow mein, potstickers, and lo mein, at the Chinese restaurant. Yes: We loved the chow mein, potstickers, and lo mein at the Chinese restaurant.

71 Spelling Words Easily Confused Words

72 proceed precede advise advice formerly formally further farther personal personnel immigrate emigrate college collage descent dissent persecution prosecution envelope envelop complimentary complementary eminent imminent liable libel

73 Friday Question of the Day How can we understand and appreciate our cultural differences?

74 Today we will learn about: Build Concept Vocabulary Compare and Contrast Exaggeration Context Clues Grammar: Commas Spelling: Easily Confused Words Instruction Manual Customs

75 Compare and Contrast Writers sometimes use comparisons and contrasts to organize their writing. Clue words such as same, also, before, although, and however signal comparisons and contrasts. Good readers notice the author’s comparisons and contrasts and make their own as they read.

76 Exaggeration Exaggeration is something overstated and made greater than it actually is. Authors use it for emphasis, and its effect can be either serious or comic. Generally, the greater the exaggeration, the funnier it is. Another word for exaggeration is hyperbole.

77 Context Clues Some unfamiliar words you will encounter have more than one meaning. Complete the chart by considering the context of the surrounding words. Use a dictionary to confirm the appropriate meaning.

78 Context Clues

79 Instruction Manual Give an example of a manual you have used. A handbook and a manual are the same and resemble a textbook in some ways. Note the parts of a manual that are similar to a textbook:

80 Instruction Manual The table of contents shows how the text is divided and which topics are on specific pages. The index lists keywords and which page numbers to find them on. Sections or chapters divide the text for the purpose of organization.

81

82 GrammarCommas

83 joan did you know her birthday is Tuesday may 8 Joan, did you know her birthday is Tuesday, May 8? meg sat her plate down and ate the prawns that she enjoyed the mostest Meg set her plate down and ate the prawns that she enjoyed the most.

84 Commas Commas are used to set off elements in sentences, such as introductory words or phrases, nouns of direct address, appositives, and interrupting words or phrases. Commas tell readers where to pause. They also make writing easier to read.

85 Spelling Words Easily Confused Words

86 proceed precede advise advice formerly formally further farther personal personnel immigrate emigrate college collage descent dissent persecution prosecution envelope envelop complimentary complementary eminent imminent liable libel

87 Story test Classroom webpage, Reading Test AR Other Reading Quizzes Quiz #


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