Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

…Once upon the time Our area was a silent place… But then a new animal became important.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "…Once upon the time Our area was a silent place… But then a new animal became important."— Presentation transcript:

1 …Once upon the time Our area was a silent place… But then a new animal became important

2 Here we are, ready to change the world

3 During the 5th und 6th century the first wave of migration of nations brought the Hermunduren to our area. They were a tribe from Thuringia. The tribe of the Franken and Slavic peoples followed. They cut the trees and started agriculture

4 Traces of the first humen in our area From the sun observatory in Goseck to the sky disc of Nebra- many cultures developed here, lived and died. They left their traces here and examples of their contacts to other cultures were found - bronze, iron, pottery from many parts of the known world - most of them from the south of Europe BC

5 Tacitus wrote to his Imperator about the Germans: Map of the Roman Empire and Germania Magna in the early 2nd century, with the location of some tribes described by Tacitus as Germanic. All have fierce blue eyes, red hair, huge frames, fit only for a sudden exertion. They are less able to bear laborious work. Heat and thirst they cannot in the least endure; to cold and hunger their climate and their soil inure them.

6 What we have learnt from the Romans winegrowing house construction vegetable cultivation modern fashion dealing with money and manny other things…

7 Other cultures and nations brought their ideas to Germany too… The Thirty Years' War opened Germany for new religious influences The basic for German laws were brought by Napoleon I. Gustav II Adolf Napoleon I

8 Germany today multiculti but full of contrasts

9 International food is the most important impact on our life

10 Facts about migration in Germany Between 1945 and 1949, around 12 million displaced persons and refugees entered the territories of East and West Germany. From the foundation of the German Democratic Republic (GDR) in 1949 until the Berlin Wall was built in 1961, 3.8 million people relocated from the GDR to the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG).

11 Foreign workers and their families During this period, the Federal Republic concluded its first bilateral agreement on labour recruitment (Anwerbeabkommen) with Italy (1955). The agreement was necessitated by the fact that the Federal Republic was experiencing rapid economic growth while simultaneously suffering from labour shortages. Similar agreements followed with Spain (1960), Greece (1960), Turkey (1961) and Yugoslavia (1968). In 1968, there were 1.9 million foreigners living in the Federal Republic, one million of whom were employed. Within five years, up to the cancellation of the labour recruitment agreements (Anwerbestopp) in 1973, the number of employed foreigners reached its highest level to date at 2.6 million. The largest groups at that time were from Turkey ( ), Yugoslavia ( ), Italy ( ), Greece ( ) and Spain ( ). Over the same period, the total number of foreigners increased to four million, more than double the figure from The disparity

12 Since the end of the 1980s, the temporary employment of foreign workers, including contract employees, seasonal workers and showman's assistants has once again assumed a significant role. In 2005, permits were granted to seasonal workers and showmans's assistants. The average number of contract employees in 2003 was ; the decline in this figure to in 2005 is, above all, attributable to Central and East European states joining the European Union. Since that time, people from these states have been able to offer their services in certain economic sectors independently of bilateral labour contract agreements. The so-called Green Card also served to recruit manpower for a limited period (five years). Between 1st August 2000 and the 31st December 2004, work permits were granted to foreign professionals in the information technology (IT) sector, of which were actually taken up. bpb.de/gesellschaft/migration/dossier-migration/58355/historical-development

13 Migration in the GDR The GDR also began recruiting so-called "contract workers" in the 1960s. To this end, it concluded agreements with other socialist states, including Poland (1965), Hungary (1967), Mozambique (1979) and Vietnam (1980). While the main focus of these agreements was initially on the provision of education and training for workers, this recruitment later served primarily to cover labour shortages. the GDR concentrated more rigorously on limiting periods of residency than the Federal Republic did, as it wanted to avoid any "creeping integration". At the end of 1989, about foreigners were resident in the GDR; around were "contract workers", of whom roughly were from Vietnam. (For data on the GDR, see DFG Bildungswerk (2005).) Since the end of the 1980s, the temporary employment of foreign workers, including contract employees, seasonal workers and showman's assistants has once again assumed a significant role. In 2005, permits were granted to seasonal workers and showmans's assistants. The average number of contract employees in 2003 was ; the decline in this figure to in 2005 is, above all, attributable to. Central and East European states joining the European Union. Since that time, people from these states have been able to offer their services in certain economic sectors independently of bilateral labour contract agreements. The so-called Green Card also served to recruit manpower for a limited period (five years). Between 1st August 2000 and the 31st December 2004, work permits were granted to foreign professionals in the information technology (IT) sector, of which were actually taken up. bpb.de/gesellschaft/migration/dossier-migration/58355/historical-development

14 in ,8 million people lived in Germany 8,8 % are people from other countries 19,3 % of all people in Germany have a migration background, that means one of their parents came from an other country There are big differences between the old part of Germany ( FRG until 1990) and the new federal states after 1990 People with migration background in Germany

15 Poor living conditions generate the urge to migrate The population grows while economic development stagnates Voilence and the abuse of power force people to flee The rich industrialized states are becoming more accessible Reasons for migration

16 Living together – that is what most of Germans do Understanding Tolerance Solidarity Help Friendship Freedom Democracy Peace Hope

17 What would we be without you all…

18 May be – we were alone – allone in the wood…


Download ppt "…Once upon the time Our area was a silent place… But then a new animal became important."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google