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ACP SUGAR RESEARCH PROGRAMME MID-TERM REVIEW WORKSHP 1 – 4 OCTOBER 2012 MSIRI, MAURITIUS Future Orientations of Research and Development for Sugar Cane.

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Presentation on theme: "ACP SUGAR RESEARCH PROGRAMME MID-TERM REVIEW WORKSHP 1 – 4 OCTOBER 2012 MSIRI, MAURITIUS Future Orientations of Research and Development for Sugar Cane."— Presentation transcript:

1 ACP SUGAR RESEARCH PROGRAMME MID-TERM REVIEW WORKSHP 1 – 4 OCTOBER 2012 MSIRI, MAURITIUS Future Orientations of Research and Development for Sugar Cane Industries of ACP States Jean Claude Autrey Chair, ACP Scientific Committee on Sugar & Scientific Advisory Group on Sugar

2 ACP Member States: 79 Sugar Producing States: 38 Sugar Protocol Members: 19 Barbados, Belize, Côte-d'Ivoire, DRC, Fiji, Guyana, Jamaica, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, St. Kitts & Nevis, Surinam, Swaziland, Tanzania, Trinidad & Tobago, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe. Non Sugar Protocol Members Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Congo (Brazzaville), Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Gabon, Guinée, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Samoa, Sénégal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Sugar Protocol Members

3 Sugar Production ( )

4 Top ACP - Protocol Producers ‘000 tonnes, raw value Average

5 Top ACP - Non-Protocol Producers ‘000 tonnes, raw value Average

6 Sugar Exports

7 Top ACP - Protocol Exporters ‘000 tonnes, raw value Average

8 Top ACP - Non Protocol Exporters ‘000 tonnes, raw value Average

9 ACP % Global Sugar Production

10 ACP % Global Sugar Exports ( )

11 Intra-ACP Collaboration on R&D

12 LESSONS LEARNED FROM FIRST R & D PROGRAMME 1.Lengthy process 2.Complex procedures for project proposal preparation 3.Difficulties in meeting criteria set for evaluation of projects 4.Delay in signature of contracts with research centres 5.Stringent criteria for procurement of equipment and services ACP SUGAR RESEARCH PROGRAMME BUT VALUE EURO 13 M IS UNIQUE

13 ACP SUGAR CANE PRODUCING COUNTRIES 1.Diverse 2.Geographically dispersed 3.Various stages of development: - Elementary - Advanced - Efficient/Inefficient 4. High cost of production 5. Simple products: raw sugar 6. Diversified products: refined sugar, speciality sugars, electricity, bioethanol, other chemicals 7.Lack of research infrastructure in general BUT High productivity of cane and sugar, especially under irrigated conditions

14 ACP SUGAR CANE PRODUCING COUNTRIES CHALLENGES 1.Lowering cost of production 2.Increasing productivity 3.Broadening range of products 4.Adding value to co-products 5.Meeting environmental norms 6.Ensuring sustainable production 7.Ensuring efficient management and technology transfer 8.Taking advantage of advances in science and technology 9.Coping with societal issues

15 ACP SUGAR CANE PRODUCING COUNTRIES SOCIETAL ISSUES 1.Need for increased food production 2.Need for clean energy from renewable sources 3.Need for low carbon economy 4.Need to cope with climate change

16 ACP SUGAR CANE PRODUCING COUNTRIES Research needed to address the challenges and societal issues Wide consultation with researchers across the world both in ACP and other countries including Australia, France, Brazil Future orientations grouped along 10 avenues: -Crop improvement -Biotechnology -Crop protection -Crop management -Environment -Sustainability -Factory and refining -Energy -Co-Products -Management and capacity building

17 What cane variety for the future ? Normal cane (current) High quality cane High fibre cane Energy cane

18 Breeding for biomass Different scenarii Commercial Variety % fibre Sugar + bagasse for electricity + ethanol Increasing fibre content Introgression from wild species High quality variety % pol More sugar + more bagasse for electricity + ethanol Energy Cane >30% fibre No sugar Ethanol/rum Electricity High fibre variety % fibre Sugar + much more bagasse for electricity + ethanol

19 BREEDING FOR BIOMASS New variety development initiative to meet future challenges

20 CROP IMPROVEMENT Breeding Breeding for energy canes – High fibre – Tolerant to abiotic constraints – Usable sucrose Breeding for marginal areas Breeding for drought tolerance Development of computer systems

21 Breeding/biotechnology Develop biotechnology laboratories on a regional basis in Africa, the Caribbean and Pacific for – Fingerprinting varieties for precise identification – Diagnostic testing for disease identification – Diagnostic testing of insect pests – Support to quarantine and safe movement of germplasm – Production of GM canes

22 CROP PROTECTION Entomology Elaboration of a sugar cane biosecurity programme Setting up of a central biological control facility for Africa Integrated pest management: optimisation of ecological processes Pathology Metagenomics to identify the genomes of all viruses that inhabit sugar cane Multiplex diagnosis of diseases using DNA microarray and PCR. Development of mini-setts as planting material

23 CROP MANAGEMENT Soils Water Environment Sustainability

24 Soils Management of salinity and sodic soils

25 Water Water management, particularly efficient use of irrigation water Management of drainage Assess impacts of projected climate change scenarios on water availability

26 Environment Green cane harvesting: need for machines for small scale outgrowers Quantification of GHGs released/sequested under a range of sugar production systems Improve and simplify carbon footprint estimation by sugar cane growers

27 Sustainability Investigate new farming systems that reduce costs, improve sustainability of soils, minimise water usage, and facilitate harvesting Investigate methods to reduce input costs of fertilisers, herbicides and energy Assess agricultural challenges associated with delivering additional fibre for cogeneration

28 Factory / Refining Reducing costs of production. Reducing agricultural pollution. Managing water utilisations. Coping with high fibre cane Using computer models to investigate season length, cane payment systems, incentives to produce specific cane qualities. Using network analysis to study integrated production systems. Investigate green chemistry and green technology. Investigate refining decolourisation processes, back end refining and producing plantation white sugar without using sulphur.

29 ADDING VALUE TO THE RENEWABLE BIOMASS INDUSTRY Ethanol Car in 1925 Ethanol car 1924

30 Energy / Co-products No research needed for bioethanol production and electricity cogeneration: purchase of turn key projects. Adding value to molasses (instead of spraying on roads): animal feed Trash collection, transport and separation. Saving/economising energy. Adding value to mill mud, ash, effluent water and vinasse Adding value to ethanol with the production of organic substances. Use of sucrose to produce high value co-products. Bagasse pelleting Torrefaction and Gasification of bagasse Cellulosic fermentation Use of energy crops: sweet sorghum, sugar cane relatives and woody species: Eucalyptus Use of woodchips as fuel in factories close to wood processing industries especially outside cane crop season for year round electric production.

31 MANAGEMENT Training in technology transfer, followed by transfer of technology to farmers on small holdings Supply chain optimisation involving length of milling season, cane payments and incentives to deliver different cane components Use of a Network Analysis package to analyse complex systems Improve safety on both the factory floor and cane farm. Training in applied statistics

32 NEW R & D PROGRAMME To be elaborated along four main avenues: - Enhanced production * New varieties and new canes * Disease and pest control * Novel methods of bulking new cane germplasm - Sustainable production * Soil management * Water management * Alleviation of climate change * Coping with environmental norms

33 NEW R & D PROGRAMME - Improved Processes * Milling of new canes * Improving milling and refining processes * Managing integrated production system All four avenues imply better management, capacity building, supply chain optimization, quality control, etc… - Value Addition * Use of total cane biomass * Second generation of products: cellulosic ethanol, gasification and torrefaction of bagasse * High value organic substances * Exploitation of other energy crops

34 NEXT STEPS The obvious Build up on the achievements of the First ACP R & D programme and lessons learned e.g. new hybrids, early canes, safe germplasm exchange, resource management, optimisation of energy use, environmental norms, sustainability

35 NEXT STEPS The obvious Elaboration of broad themes by ACP Sugar Research Committee Prioritisation of projects through discussions with ACP researchers and others Preparations of outlines of research project proposals Interaction with donor agencies for funding: EU, etc… Taking advantage of Euro 7 billion under EU’s Seventh Framework Programme for Research to boost up innovation as per press release of 20 July Euro 265 million reserved for environmental research to address climate change, etc… Promote capacity building through provision or sponsorship of training in R&D work, sugar technology (raw and refining), laboratory operations and in any other relevant field

36 NEXT STEPS The less obvious Investigate possibilities of developing new, simple R&D facilities, particularly in Africa - This could involve participation / co-opting of qualified outsiders for specific projects Creation of regional centres for specific objectives: biological control, disease diagnosis, co-product valorisation, bioenergy, biotechnology, sustainability, etc… (could be units within established centres)

37 NEXT STEPS International Consortium for Sugarcane Biotechnology - (ICSB) Brazilian Consortium for Bagasse Gasification – BIOSYNGAS International Sugar Cane Biomass Utilization Consortium (ISBUC) GETTING ORGANIZED THROUGH NETWORKING

38 ISSCT International Consortium for Sugarcane Biotechnology - (ICSB) : Informal agreement between HSPA & CTC (Brazil) to jointly fund a research project 1991 : Agreement to form a group to jointly sponsor research projects (4 countries, 7 institutions) 1992 : Formalization of the ICSB - 10 members 2011 : ICSB has 19 members from 13 countries Member countries: Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, France, Guatemala, India, Mauritius, Philippines, South Africa, USA, West Indies

39 International Consortium for Sugarcane Biotechnology- (ICSB) : 29 research projects funded for > US $ Membership fee:US $ annually Meetings:One business meeting held annually Members who do not sponsor a specific project are not entitled to its results, however can join in at a later stage but with a higher fee involved

40 ISSCT International Sugar Cane Biomass Utilization Consortium (ISBUC) Members of ISBUC participants in gasification of bagasse project - Associação Brasileira de Luz Síncrotron (ABTLuS ) - Brazilian Association for Synchrotron Light Technology, Brazil - Cosan S/A Industria E Comercio, Brazil - Centro de Tecnologia Canavieira (CTC), Brazil - Dedini S/A Indústrias De Base, Brazil - eRcane, Reunion - Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnológicas do Estado de Sao Paulo - SA (IPT), Brazil - Mitr Phol Sugarcane Research Centre, Thailand - Omnicane, Mauritius - South African Sugar Association (SASA) -Sugar Milling Research Institute (SMRI), South Africa - Sugar Research Ltd, Australia

41 Research entities Public Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnológias do Estado de São Paulo (IPT) Escola Superior de Agronomia Luis de Queiroz (ESALQ) Private Centro de Technologia Canavieira (CTC) – R&D for 160 mills Sugar cane industry COSAN (23 mills, 60 million tonnes of cane) Private Sector: Others Petrobras – oil & biofuels Brasken - chemicals Oxyteno – gas Vale Soluções em Energia (VSE) – Energy equipment Banks: Banco Nacional de Desenvolvimento Econômico e Social Budget: USD 50 M Duration: 5 years Date of initiation: 1 January 2012 Brazilian Consortium for Bagasse Gasification – BIOSYNGAS Government: Ministry of Science and Technology, Brazil

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44 BIOMASS UTILIZATION FOR GENERATION OF SUGAR AND COPRODUCTS Cane biomass Effluents from bioplastics Biotechnology tools Solar energy Biofertilizers co 2 Value-dded molecules Sugar factory Cane and trash Biofertilizers Sugar exports Vinasse Cogeneration plants Ethanol distillery Ethanol Liquors, etc. Bagasse and trash Steam & electricity Sugar Food products Cane juice Molasses Steam & electricity Solvents Bioplastic factory Steam and electricity co 2 Sugar Bioplastics co 2 Leaves & trash Effluents

45 FUTURE EVOLUTION OF THE SUGAR CANE INDUSTRY Cane biomass Effluents from bioplastics Biotechnology tools Solar energy Biofertilizers co 2 Value-added molecules Cane and trash Biofertilizers Sugar exports Vinasse Ethanol Liquors, etc. Bagasse and trash Steam & electricity Sugar Cane juice Molasses Steam & electricity Solvents Steam and electricity co 2 Sugar Bioplastics co 2 Leaves & trash Effluents Sugar factory Food products Cogen. plants Ethanol distillery Bioplastic factory SUGARCROPSSUGARCROPS Fibre Crops E-Grass (Miscanthus giganteus), Giant Reed (Arundo donax), Switch grass (Panicum virgatum), Elephant Grass (Pennisetum purpureum) Acacia (Leucaena spp), Eucalyptus (Eucaliptus cinerea) Sweet sorghum

46 MISCANTHUS

47 Sugar cane provides sustainability through: - Employment - Net export earnings - Avoidance of fossil fuel import - Cheaper electricity - Carbon sequestration - Assignments for service industry - Low pollution load - Soil conservation - Greenery for landscaping - Broad land ownership Sugar cane provides sustainability through: - Employment - Net export earnings - Avoidance of fossil fuel import - Cheaper electricity - Carbon sequestration - Assignments for service industry - Low pollution load - Soil conservation - Greenery for landscaping - Broad land ownership

48 Dancing naked in the mind field Dr Kary Mullis “ There is a very important rule in evolution. Don’t trouble yourself with details that do not matter for survival. Who ever can do something more efficiently, survives.” Page 157

49 Conclusions  The world will need more food (sugar)  The world will need more clean renewable and sustainable energy (ethanol, electricity)  The world will need a low carbon economy Food Energy Low Carbon Sugar cane

50 SURPRISING ASPECTS OF BIOMASS TOO MUCH SUGAR & ETHANOL ??!!

51 J. MAURICE PATURAU – Grand Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur Chevalier de l’Ordre de la Libération Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE) Grand Officer of the Order of Star and Key of the Indian Ocean (GOSK) By-Products of the cane sugar industry: An introduction to their industrial utilization, 1969

52 Sugar Electricity Ethanol Bioplastics Green Cement Carbon Credits Thank you

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