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Learning to Compete A CCELERATING I NDUSTRIAL D EVELOPMENT IN A FRICA A C OLLABORATIVE R ESEARCH P ROGRAM OF T HE A FRICAN D EVELOPMENT B ANK, T HE B ROOKINGS.

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Presentation on theme: "Learning to Compete A CCELERATING I NDUSTRIAL D EVELOPMENT IN A FRICA A C OLLABORATIVE R ESEARCH P ROGRAM OF T HE A FRICAN D EVELOPMENT B ANK, T HE B ROOKINGS."— Presentation transcript:

1 Learning to Compete A CCELERATING I NDUSTRIAL D EVELOPMENT IN A FRICA A C OLLABORATIVE R ESEARCH P ROGRAM OF T HE A FRICAN D EVELOPMENT B ANK, T HE B ROOKINGS I NSTITUTION, AND THE U NITED N ATIONS U NIVERSITY – W ORLD I NSTITUTE OF D EVELOPMENT E CONOMICS R ESEARCH J OHN P AGE JICA, 3 J UNE 2013

2 B EYOND THE I NVESTMENT C LIMATE Most analysis of Africa’s lagging industrial development focuses on the investment climate. – “Doing Business” – Infrastructure and Skills Investment climate studies focus explicitly on the environment external to the firm. There has been renewed academic and policy interest in what happens within (“firm capabilities”) and between firms (externalities and coordination failures) These are the key issues in the industrial policy debate.

3 T HREE D RIVERS OF I NDUSTRIAL L OCATION T RADE IN TASKS – Technical change has brought about “vertical disintegration” of production. – A chance for a foothold, but many low wage economies have not attracted task-based production F IRM CAPABILITIES – Capabilities are the tacit knowledge and working practices needed for production and product development – Capabilities can spill over to other firms through FDI or supply chain links A GGLOMERATIONS – Industrial clusters confer significant productivity gains – Starting a new industrial agglomeration is a form of collective action problem

4 F OUR R ESEARCH T HEMES Learning by exporting and learning to export – Data is scarce and the econometrics are fragile Understanding agglomeration in low income countries – Undertaking the first quantitative studies in low income countries Foreign direct investment and firm capabilities – Do domestic firms learn from foreign investors, and how? Implementing industrial policy – Successes and failures in close coordination

5 T WELVE C OUNTRY S TUDIES The industrialization experience of each African economy has been influenced by resource endowments, policy choices and external markets. The research program has undertaken detailed case studies of the industrialization process in a range of African and non-African countries. The case studies document the history of each country’s industrialization process and the evolution of public policies designed to influence industrial development.

6 Country Coverage Ten African Countries: Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania, Tunisia and Uganda. Two Non-African Economies: Vietnam, Cambodia.

7 A Three Track Approach Identify and analyze the stock of firm level surveys that currently exist using an agreed common analytical approach. Undertake analytical case studies of firms, industries and industrial agglomerations, using a common qualitative, survey-based approach. Undertake country level studies of the development of the industrial and modern services sectors.

8 Where Do we Stand? All 12 country case studies are in draft. Eight quantitative studies of learning by exporting in draft (4-5 are likely to be of journal standard). Six quantitative studies of learning by exporting in draft (3-4 are likely to be of journal standard). Four case studies of Presidential Investors’ Advisory Councils in Africa in draft. Qualitative surveys of FDI-domestic firm interactions in the field (3 are complete). UNU-WIDER Conference on L2C in Helsinki, June 2013

9 Some Early Results Learning by Exporting and Learning to Export – African firms learn from exporting but we know much less about how they learn to export (Ethiopia; Kenya; Mozambique; Tunisia; Vietnam) – Is it firms that learn to export or is it entrepreneurs? (Ethiopia; Mozambique; Vietnam) – Many manufacturing exporters are “Born Globals” -- firms established as an export entity from day one (Cambodia; Mozambique; Tunisia) – Vietnam is different and interesting. After WTO accession domestic firms began to learn to export (self-selection) and to learn from exporting. Learning is strongest in firms exporting final products and in particular firms that experience technology transfers from their customers (demanding clients). Agglomerations – Agglomerations raise the physical productivity of firms (Cambodia; Ethiopia, Mozambique; Vietnam) – In localized markets they also increase competition and reduce prices (Cambodia; Ethiopia, Mozambique Vietnam) – These effects tend to vary by sector and by the characteristics of the firms themselves (Cambodia; Ethiopia; Vietnam) – There is little evidence that the current policies in relation to clustering, such as the establishment of Export Processing Zones or Industrial Parks, are effective (Cambodia; Ethiopia; Ghana; Kenya; Mozambique; Tanzania; Uganda)

10 Some Early Results FDI spill-overs – Very few within country linkages are present within manufacturing in Africa (Ethiopia; Ghana; Kenya; Uganda) – Existing FDI investments are often enclaves (Ethiopia; Ghana; Mozambique; Uganda; Tanzania) – Where FDI has increased competition some local firms have directly adopted or imitated production processes or techniques from FDI firms (Ethiopia; Uganda). – Labor dynamics may be a stronger source of FDI spillovers than previously thought (Ethiopia; Mozambique; Uganda) – Former employees of FDI firms have improved the production techniques of locally owned firms (Ethiopia; Uganda ). Firm Capabilities – Demanding buyers – both in exports and domestically – improve the productivity of supplying firms (Cambodia; Ethiopia; Tunisia; Vietnam) – Within industry entry and exit are not the only drivers of productivity growth: firms switching activities from one sector to another is an important component of productivity growth (Vietnam). – Small enterprise is not a net “job creator”: high firm mortality rates offset higher growth rates (Ethiopia) Implementing Industrial Policy – Presidential Investors Advisory Councils have been successful at focusing attention on externally (World Bank) identified reforms, but not at addressing industry or sector specific constraints to competitiveness (Ethiopia, Senegal, Tanzania, Uganda) – Reducing the level and incidence of bribery by public officials facilitates a more efficient allocation of capital (Vietnam )

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