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Www.cafod.org.uk. Almost half – over three billion people – live on less than £1.65 a day 98% of the world’s hungry people live in developing countries.

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Presentation on theme: "Www.cafod.org.uk. Almost half – over three billion people – live on less than £1.65 a day 98% of the world’s hungry people live in developing countries."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Almost half – over three billion people – live on less than £1.65 a day 98% of the world’s hungry people live in developing countries 50,000 people die every day as a result of poverty

3 Hunger Disease Lack of education Fewer job opportunities Can’t Work Poverty

4 57 percent of Mozambique’s people live below the poverty lineMozambique is suffering cycles of droughts and floods In 2009, 11.5% of the adult population were living with HIV.Before 1992, decades of war slowed development Corruption slows development even furtherThere are not always proper checks on how aid is being used

5 CAFOD is working for a better world for everyone Ending poverty will prevent the deaths of millions Ending poverty will also make the world a safer place… Internally Displaced Persons in the Democratic Republic of Congo tell stories of attacks by the Lord's Resistance Army....how?

6 With CAFOD’s support to construct and maintain water filters, Telya and her family now have clean water to drink and are healthy enough to work. How does this show CAFOD helping to break the cycle of poverty? Telya, 12 from Nigeria

7 How do you think these trade rules affect developing countries? Find out moremore Trade rules favour the richer countries Trade “liberalisation” prevents developing countries from protecting their farmers and producers from unfair international competition Rich countries are forcing developing countries to compete on world markets before they are ready The EU and the US protect their farmers, helping them to compete against producers in developing countries. Developing countries can’t afford to help in this way.

8 How can debt cancellation help a country to tackle poverty? Find out moremore In the s, rich countries loaned developing countries large sums of money at apparently low rates of interest In the 1980s interest rates soared and many could not pay their debts, owing huge amounts even after repaying more than they had borrowed Some debts have now been cancelled

9 Can you name a conflict that has caused poverty for ordinary citizens? Conflict often kills young people Conflict is the worst possible thing that can happen to a developing country, to any country; it sets development back by decades Wars make a country unstable - business and agriculture suffer Government money is spent on war, rather than other important areas

10 How does poor health increase poverty, and vice versa? Every year lack of safe water and sanitation cause the deaths of 2.2 million children worldwide 34 million people live with HIV, two thirds of them in sub-Saharan Africa Malaria accounts for a fifth of childhood deaths in Africa Poorer countries lack money for healthcare, health education and drugs

11 Some multinational companies (MNCs) are richer than a developing country Governments often welcome MNCs – they bring investment and technology. Mining and oil companies especially generate huge revenues But the cost can be environmental destruction and low wages and bad conditions for workers Poor systems of accountability enable some leaders in developing countries to misuse foreign investment and international aid

12 The overwhelming body of scientific opinion has concluded that human actions, mostly by developed countries, are causing climate change In many developing countries, droughts, hurricanes or floods are common How might poor communities find it difficult to respond to climate change?

13 What is a natural disaster? Earthquake Volcano Tsunami Hurricane Flood Can you think of any others? Why do developing countries find it so difficult to recover after a natural disaster?

14 The wealthier countries give money for international development – which means helping poorer countries When properly used, this money tackles real problems, such as health and education What percentage of its income do you think each country should give?

15 The Trade Justice Movement campaigns to change UK, EU and global policies on trade The Fairtrade mark ensures a fair deal for many small producers What could you do to help make trade fairer?

16 Since 2005, many debts to the World Bank and IMF have been cancelled The world’s poorest 128 countries still owe £23.6 trillion If all debt was cancelled, in what ways might a developing country spend its money?

17 International commitment to tackle climate change is urgently needed Developed countries need to reduce their carbon emissions Developing countries need extra funds to adapt to the impact of major weather events They also need money and technology support to grow without high levels of emissions What can you do to help address climate change? Take action with CAFOD here here

18 International companies should be open (‘transparent’) about how they work overseas Anti-corruption laws, such as the UK’s Bribery Act passed in April 2010, can help ensure this happens For example, making it easier to prosecute companies that bribe foreign public officials

19 Picture credits: Simon Rawles, Bridget Burrows, Annie Bungeroth, World Development Movement/ Beverley Duckworth, Thomas Omondi, Caritas Internationalis, Tina Leme, Ataklti Mulu, Pieternella Pieterse.


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