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Lesson 8.2c: The Three-fifths Compromise. Today we will explain how the issue of slavery was addressed at the Constitutional Convention.

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Presentation on theme: "Lesson 8.2c: The Three-fifths Compromise. Today we will explain how the issue of slavery was addressed at the Constitutional Convention."— Presentation transcript:

1 Lesson 8.2c: The Three-fifths Compromise

2 Today we will explain how the issue of slavery was addressed at the Constitutional Convention.

3 What We Already Know The Articles of Confederation created a government that was so weak that it could not function effectively.

4 What We Already Know In 1787, 55 delegates from twelve states met in Philadelphia as the Constitutional Convention and began to create a new national government.

5 What We Already Know After much debate and compromise, the delegates were able to settle the issue of the structure of Congress, and how the states would be represented.

6 Question of Slaves Because representation in the House of Representatives would be based on the population of each state, the delegates had to decide who would be counted in that population.

7 Question of Slaves Southern states wanted the slaves to be counted as part of the general population for representation, but not for taxation.

8 A and B Discuss Can you predict how the northern states reacted to the southern states wanting to count their slaves for population purposed, but not for taxation? Be prepared to share your answers with the class.

9 Question of Slaves The Northern states argued just the opposite saying that slaves were property, not citizens, and should not be counted for representation, but should be counted for taxation.

10 The Three Fifths Compromise Under this compromise, three-fifths of the slave population would be counted when setting direct taxes on the states. This three-fifths ratio also would be used to determine representation in the House of Representatives.

11 A and B Discuss Do you think the Three-Fifths Compromise was a good piece of legislation. Why do you think the southern states were so insistent on counting the slaves? Be prepared to share your answers with the class.

12 The Three Fifths Compromise The Three-Fifths Compromise did not outlaw slavery. By 1787 all of the northern states and several states had banned the import of new slaves from Africa. While many Northerners wanted to see this ban extended to the rest of the nation, Southern slaveholders strongly disagreed.

13 The Three Fifths Compromise The delegates from South Carolina and Georgia stated that they would never accept any plan “unless their right to import slaves be untouched.” Again, a compromise was reached. On August 29, it was agreed that Congress could not ban the slave trade until 1808

14 The Three Fifths Compromise This ban on laws limiting the slave trade was the only limit placed on Congress’ power to regulate trade.

15 Get your whiteboards and markers ready!

16 A. Slaves would be freed when they reached the age of 30. B. Slaves would be counted as three-fifths of a person for representation in Congress. C. Slaves would be counted as three-fifths of a person for taxation. How did the Constitutional Convention reach a compromise on the issue of slavery? D. The importation of slaves could not be restricted until (Choose all that apply. ) E. Slavery could not be banned by Congress before 1808.

17 A. The Federal Trade Commission B. Congress C. The president According to the new Constitution, who had the power to regulate trade? D. The Secretary of State (Choose all that apply. )

18 A. Favored smaller states. B. Favored states with larger populations. C. Proposed a bicameral legislation. The Virginia Plan… D. Wanted slaves to count for taxation. (Choose all that apply. )

19 A. Placed no restrictions on slavery until B. Three fifths of the slave population will be counted toward representation in the House of Representatives. C. Three-fifths of the slave population would be counted when setting direct taxes on the states. The Three – Fifths Compromise… D. Congress would be divided into two houses; the Senate, and the House of Representatives. (Choose all that apply. )

20 A and B Discuss Why were the Southern states so unwilling to give up their slaves? Did the delegates do the right thing in agreeing to the Three-Fifths Compromise? Be prepared to share your answers with the class.


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