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Support for Personalized Learning and the New Priorities: Aligning Educational Initiatives 1 April 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "Support for Personalized Learning and the New Priorities: Aligning Educational Initiatives 1 April 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Support for Personalized Learning and the New Priorities: Aligning Educational Initiatives 1 April 2012

2 Acknowledgement Information in this PowerPoint was adapted from Connecting RTI to New Priorities: Aligning Educational Initiatives prepared by the Center on Instruction,

3 Agenda – Brief History of the Project – Support for Personalized Learning – Overview of the System – Dynamic inputs: Policy – Dynamic inputs: Standards – Desired outputs: Diverse Learners – Common Themes Across Topics – Recommendations for TA – Next Steps – Final Thoughts – Questions 3

4 History of the Project SPL Leadership Group – Eight WVDE Offices: School Improvement, Instruction, Special Programs, Title I, Research, Healthy Schools, Assessment and Accountability and Title II, III and System Support – Eight Regional Education Service Agencies (RESAs) 4

5 Working Meetings: SPL and West Virginia Priorities: Aligning Educational Initiatives West Virginia priority areas: – SIG/Transformation Model – Diverse Learners Students with Disabilities English language learners – College and Career Readiness Common Core State Standards 5

6 Overview of the System 6

7 Dynamic Inputs Policy Funding Standards Curricula – Assessments/accountability requirements 7

8 Robust Instructional System Efficient allocation of resources – Evidence-based practices – Effective instruction – Effective assessment – Data-based instructional decision-making 8

9 Desired Outputs All students graduate College and Career Ready – English language learners – Struggling students – Students with disabilities – Gifted and talented 9

10 School Improvement Grants 10

11 School Improvement Grants Provision of funding to support improvement of the “persistently lowest- achieving schools” Intervention Model – Transformation model 11

12 SIG Alignment with SPL SPL is a framework for resource allocation (time, materials, staff, other resources) SIG is a funding source designed to support school improvement

13 SIG Big Ideas Create, communicate and disseminate explicit connections between SIG and SPL for RESAs, SEA & LEAs Support collaboration Provide capacity-building and sustainability at all levels Identify implementation tools 13

14 SIG and SPL Support for Personalized Learning FrameworkSchool improvement grants transformation model 2 Aligning the goals and vision for SPL implementation with other educational initiatives, including developing guidance for districts and schools, defining the relationship between SPL and other statewide educational goals and initiatives, and exploring the potential role of SPL in identifying students with learning disabilities and/or eligibility for special education services Implementing school-wide SPL components Ensuring all stakeholders on the state-level SPL leadership group comprehensive representation and equal voice in conducting and developing team meetings and procedures Monitoring and/or evaluating implementation successes and challenges, needs assessments, and integrity of implementation Conducting periodic reviews to ensure that the curriculum is implemented with integrity, is having the intended impact on student achievement and is modified if ineffective 14

15 SIG and SPL Support for Personalized Learning Framework School improvement grants transformation model 2 Acknowledging and preparing for new roles and responsibilities that come with implementing, building consensus, allocating resources, providing/seeking technical assistance, scaling up from initial to full implementation, running pilot/demonstration/model sites (if any), and conducting professional development at all levels, including state and school personnel and preservice teachers Providing staff members with ongoing, high- quality, job-embedded professional development that aligns with the school’s comprehensive instructional program and that is designed with school staff members to allow them to facilitate effective teaching and learning and successfully implement school reform strategies Providing additional supports and professional development to teachers and principals on implementing effective strategies to support students with disabilities in the least restrictive environment and to ensure that limited English proficient students acquire language skills to master academic content 15

16 SIG and SPL Support for Personalized Learning FrameworkSchool improvement grants transformation model 2 Understanding, identifying and implementing the instructional components of SPL at the school level (such as core instruction, interventions, screening and progress- monitoring assessments, data-based decision making, data management and reporting systems) Identifying trainers, coaches and implementation sites (which are not necessarily the same as model/pilot/demonstration sites, but are any districts and schools that wish to or are already implementing SPL) Using data to identify and implement an instructional program that is research based, vertically aligns from one grade to the next, and aligns with state academic standards Promoting the continuous use of student data (such as from formative, interim and summative assessments) to inform and differentiate instruction to meet the academic needs of individual students Establishing schedules and implementing strategies that provide increased learning time Using and integrating technology-based supports and interventions as part of the instructional program 16 1 All items in column adapted from Center on Instruction. (2008). Implementation considerations. In Response to intervention classification tool and response locator. Retrieved from 2 All items in column adapted from U.S. Department of Education, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education. (2010). Guidance on fiscal year 2010 school improvement grants under section 1003(g) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of Washington, DC: Author.

17 Self Reflection 17 1.In your state, where do you see the connections between SIG and SPL? 2.How is alignment between SPL and SIG being communicated to RESAs and/or LEAs?

18 Resources Center on Instruction (n.d.). Selected COI resources addressing the ARRA reform area: Data systems to support instruction. Retrieved from resources-addressing-the-arra-reform-area-data-systems-to-support-instructionhttp://www.centeroninstruction.org/selected-coi- resources-addressing-the-arra-reform-area-data-systems-to-support-instruction Center on Instruction (n.d.). Selected COI resources addressing the ARRA reform area: Effective leaders and teachers. Retrieved from addressing-the-arra-reform-area-effective-leaders-and-teachershttp://www.centeroninstruction.org/selected-coi-resources- addressing-the-arra-reform-area-effective-leaders-and-teachers Center on Instruction (n.d.). Selected COI resources addressing the ARRA reform area: Standards and assessments. Retrieved from addressing-the-arra-reform-area-standards-and-assessmentshttp://www.centeroninstruction.org/selected-coi-resources- addressing-the-arra-reform-area-standards-and-assessments Center on Instruction (n.d.). Selected COI resources addressing the ARRA reform area: Turning around struggling schools. Retrieved from resources-addressing-the-arra-reform-area-turning-around-struggling-schoolshttp://www.centeroninstruction.org/selected-coi- resources-addressing-the-arra-reform-area-turning-around-struggling-schools Perlman, C. L., & Redding, S. (Ed.). (2009). Handbook on effective implementation of school improvement grants. Lincoln, IL: Academic Development Institute. Retrieved from U. S. Department of Education. School Turnaround Newsletters. Retrieved from 18

19 Common Core State Standards 19

20 Common Core State Standards Standards – Grade Level/Cluster Standards (cumulative) – Content Areas Math English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science & Technical Subjects Cumulative Standards that lead to College & Career Readiness High Cognitive Demand State/District/School Defined Curriculum & Instructional Strategies 20

21 CCSS Alignment with SPL Large range of students will be expected to obtain mastery of the CCSS. SPL is one model for meeting all of their needs: – Research-based core instruction for all students – Ongoing data collection and data-based decision making to monitor student mastery of standards – Intervention for students who don’t master foundational reading skills – Intervention for students who do not master grade level standards

22 CCSS Big Ideas Leadership is the key to using SPL to implement CCSS or other state standards and assessments Show explicit linkage between SPL and CCSS Capacity-building to ensure sustainability SPL as a systematic framework for implementing CCSS or other state standards and assessments 22

23 CCSS and SPL Elements of SPLState standardsCommon core state standards Universal screeningBrief assessments that are valid, reliable and demonstrate diagnostic accuracy for which students will develop learning or behavioral problems Progress monitoringRepeated measurement of performance to inform the instruction of individual students in general and special education; tools should be reliable and valid for representing students’ development and have demonstrated utility for helping teachers plan more effective instruction 23

24 CCSS and SPL Elements of SPL State standardsCommon core state standards Data-based decision making The use of screening, progress monitoring and formative data to examine the adequacy of the CORE curriculum as well as the effectiveness of different instructional and behavioral strategies for various groups of students within a school CORE instruction Includes the research-based core curriculum and instructional practices used for ALL students; even students who require supplemental interventions should receive instruction in the CORE curriculum Includes the research-based CORE curriculum and instructional practices used for ALL students; even students who require supplemental interventions should receive instruction in the core curriculum 24

25 CCSS and SPL Elements of SPL State standardsCommon core state standards TARGETED instruction Typically, small-group instruction that relies on evidence-based interventions that specify the instructional procedures, duration, and frequency of instruction INTENSIVE instruction Most intense of the three levels; individualized instruction to target each student’s area(s) of need 25 All items adapted from National Center on Response to Intervention. (2010). Essential components of RTI—A closer look at response to intervention. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, National Center on Response to Intervention.

26 Self Reflection 26 1.How can the current SPL infrastructure in your state be used to support the implementation of CCSS or other state standards and assessments? 2.Even though the essential components of SPL remain the same under CCSS or other state standards, how will practices within each of these components need to be modified when implementing new state standards and assessments?

27 Resources Common Core State Standards Initiative. (n.d.). Application of common core state standards for English language learners. Retrieved from Common Core State Standards Initiative. (n.d.). Application to students with disabilities. Retrieved from Common Core State Standards Initiative. (2010). Common core state standards for English language arts & literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects. Common Core State Standards Initiative. (2010). Common core state standards for mathematics. Link to all CCSS resources on the COI site: te%20Standards&explicit=1 te%20Standards&explicit=1 Consortia Developing Assessments Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) SMARTER Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) Consortia Developing Alternate Assessment Dynamic Learning Maps National Center and State Collaborative *This webinar provides a good overview of the two consortia developing the alternate assessments: 27

28 College and Career Readiness for English Language Learners 28

29 English Language Learners ELLs must have access to 1 : – Qualified personnel to support ELLs while taking advantage of the many strengths and skills they bring to the classroom; – Literacy-rich school environments where students are immersed in a variety of language experiences; – Instruction that develops foundational skills in English and enables ELLs to participate fully in grade-level coursework; – Coursework that prepares ELLs for postsecondary education or the workplace, yet is made comprehensible for students learning content in a second language (through specific pedagogical techniques and additional resources); – Opportunities for classroom discourse and interaction that are well-designed to enable ELLs to develop communicative strengths in language arts; – Ongoing assessment and feedback to guide learning; and – Speakers of English who know the language well enough to provide ELLs with models and support. 1 National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State School Officers (2010). Application of Common Core State Standards for English Language Learners. Retrieved from: 29

30 ELL Alignment with SPL Compared to traditional instructional methods, instruction in SPL: – May be less biased and more instructionally relevant – May lead to earlier identification and intervention – 1 May help decrease proportions of ELLs inappropriately referred for special education 1 Klingner, J. K., & Edwards, P. A. (2006). Cultural considerations with response to intervention models. Reading Research Quarterly, 41,

31 ELL Alignment with SPL Could some of the same problems associated with traditional models emerge in SPL? – Ex. Disproportionate numbers of ELLs receiving TARGETED and INTENSIVE instruction if they perform below criteria established for non-ELLs Is this really a problem? Not if: – Intensive instruction is beneficial for ELLs – General classroom instruction (CORE) can be designed to meet the needs of ELLs, such that the most intensive interventions are reserved for the most struggling students 31

32 ELL Big Ideas Focus on instruction in CORE Collaboration among teachers and across departments (content areas); Collaboration among other professionals Instill common vision that is embedded within the culture Formative assessments 32

33 Self Reflection 33 1.How are the needs of ELLs being addressed in primary prevention (i.e., CORE instruction) in your state? 2.What are areas in need of improvement with respect to instruction, assessment, data-based decision making and teacher preparation?

34 Resources Echevarria, J., & Hasbrouck, J. (2009, July). Create Brief: Response to Intervention and English Learners. Retrieved from Esparza Brown, J., & Sanford, A. (March 2011). RTI for English Language Learners: Appropriately Using Screening and Progress Monitoring Tools to Improve Instructional Outcomes. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, National Center on Response to Intervention. Retrieved from progress-monitoring-too progress-monitoring-too Gersten, R., Baker, S. K., Shanahan, T., Linan-Thompson, S., Collins, P., & Scarcella, R. (2007). Effective Literacy and English Language Instruction for English Learners in the Elementary Grades: A Practice Guide (NCEE ). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U. S. Department of Education. Retrieved from Meadows Center for Preventing Educational Risk at the University of Texas at Austin. (2010) Instructional decision- making procedures: Ensuring appropriate instruction for struggling students in Grades K-3. Austin, TX: Author. Retrieved from buildingrti.utexas.org/PDF/Instructional_Decision-making_Procedures.pdfbuildingrti.utexas.org/PDF/Instructional_Decision-making_Procedures.pdf Pennsylvania Department of Education. (n.d.). Response to instruction and intervention (RtII) and English language learners (ELLs). Retrieved from Center for Research on the Educational Achievement and Teaching of English Language Learners(CREATE) The George Washington University Center for Equity and Excellence in Education– ELL Accommodations Online Toolkit and Database World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) 34

35 Resources  Link to all ELL resources on the COI site: Examples: Moughamian, A. C., Rivera, M. O., & Francis, D. J. (2009). Instructional models and strategies for teaching English language learners. Portsmouth, NH: RMC Research Corporation, Center on Instruction. Retrieved from strategies-for-teaching-english-language-learnershttp://www.centeroninstruction.org/instructional-models-and- strategies-for-teaching-english-language-learners Rivera, M. O., Moughamian, A. C., Lesaux, N. K., & Francis, D. J. (2008). Language and reading interventions for English language learners and English language learners with disabilities. Portsmouth, NH: RMC Research Corporation, Center on Instruction. Retrieved from learners-and-english-language-learners-with-disabilities learners-and-english-language-learners-with-disabilities Rivera, M. O., Francis, D. J., Fernandez, M., Moughamian, A. C., Lesaux, N. K., & Jergensen, J. (2010). Effective practices for English language learners. Principals from five states speak. Portsmouth, NH: RMC Research Corporation, Center on Instruction. Retrieved from from-five-states-speak from-five-states-speak 35

36 College and Career Readiness for Students with Disabilities 36

37 Students with Disabilities Students with disabilities must have access to 1 : – Rigorous academic content standards; – Adequate preparation for success in college and/or careers; – Supports and related services designed to meet their needs – Supports and related services designed to enable their access to the general curriculum; – Individualized Education Programs with annual goals aligned with and chosen to facilitate their attainment of grade-level academic standards; – Teachers who are prepared and qualified to deliver high-quality, evidence-based, individualized instruction and support services; – Specialized instructional support personnel who are prepared and qualified to deliver high-quality, evidence-based, individualized instruction and support services; and – Appropriate additional supports and services (e.g., Universal Design for Learning, instructional accommodations, or assistive technology devices). 1 National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State School Officers (2010). Application to Students with Disabilities. Retrieved from: 37

38 SWD Alignment with SPL Data-driven instructional decision-making Early intervention rather than “wait-to-fail” Differentiated instruction for ALL students Increased collaboration and shared ownership between departments and “eds” Referral and eligibility in the context of evidence More efficient and appropriate allocation of resources 38

39 SWD Big Ideas Purposes and goals of SPL need to be made explicit to all stakeholders Need for SPL to be implemented systematically and systemically Early involvement of parents Usefulness of infusing the language of SPL into all trainings/PD done at the state level 39

40 Self Reflection 40 1.Is there a need in your state for better or more communication between general and special educators? 2.Are there advantages to you in using SPL as an instructional framework for preparing students for college and careers? 3.How are parents and other stakeholders being made aware of SPL?

41 Resources Boardman, A. G., Roberts, G., Vaughn, S., Wexler, J., Murray, C. S., & Kosanovich, M. (2008). Effective instruction for adolescent struggling readers: A practice brief. Portsmouth, NH: RMC Research Corporation, Center on Instruction. Retrieved from readers---second-editionhttp://www.centeroninstruction.org/effective-instruction-for-adolescent-struggling- readers---second-edition Gersten, R. Chard, D., Jayanthi, M., Baker, S., Morphy, P., & Flojo, J. (2008). Mathematics instruction for students with learning disabilities or difficulty learning mathematics: A synthesis of the intervention research. Portsmouth, NH: RMC Research Corporation, Center on Instruction. Retrieved from learning-mathematics-a-synthesis-of-the-intervention-research learning-mathematics-a-synthesis-of-the-intervention-research Meadows Center for Preventing Educational Risk at the University of Texas at Austin. (2010) Instructional decision- making procedures: Ensuring appropriate instruction for struggling students in Grades K-3. Austin, TX: Author. Retrieved from buildingrti.utexas.org/PDF/Instructional_Decision-making_Procedures.pdfbuildingrti.utexas.org/PDF/Instructional_Decision-making_Procedures.pdf Newman-Gonchar, R., Clarke, B., & Gersten, R. (2009). A summary of nine key studies: Multi-tier intervention and response to interventions for students struggling in mathematics. Portsmouth, NH: RMC Corporation, Center on Instruction. Retrieved from intervention-and-response-to-interventions-for-students-struggling-in-mathematicshttp://www.centeroninstruction.org/a-summary-of-nine-key-studies-multi-tier- intervention-and-response-to-interventions-for-students-struggling-in-mathematics Scammacca, N., Vaughn, S., Roberts, G., Wanzek, J., & Torgesen, J. K. (2007). Extensive reading interventions in grades k-3: From research to practice. Portsmouth, NH: RMC Research Corporation, Center on Instruction. Retrieved from to-practicehttp://www.centeroninstruction.org/extensive-reading-interventions-in-grades-k-3-from-research- to-practice Torgesen, J. K., & Miller, D. H. (2009). Assessments to guide adolescent literacy instruction. Portsmouth, NH: RMC Research Corporation, Center on Instruction. Retrieved from guide-adolescent-literacy-instructionhttp://www.centeroninstruction.org/assessments-to- guide-adolescent-literacy-instruction 41

42 Common Themes Across Topics SPL can be used to implement the priorities and support school improvement Explicit links need to be made between SPL and the priorities to support collaboration Leadership is key to implementation Need to address sustainability 42

43 Recommendations for TA Promote statewide coherence by showing explicit connections between SPL and state priorities: – Align different priorities around the common framework of SPL (increase efficiency and effectiveness and promote coherence) – Provide different offices within the state agency opportunities to talk together about SPL and state priorities – Ensure that different offices within the WVDE use common language when talking about SPL 43

44 Next Steps Action planning template 44

45 Final Thoughts Focus on state leaders– keep SPL in the front seat Include implications for districts and schools Work with each other on action planning template 45

46 Questions? 46


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