Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Budget Plan 2015-16 Bridgeport School District January 2015 1 V7 Frances Rabinowitz Interim Superintendent.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Budget Plan 2015-16 Bridgeport School District January 2015 1 V7 Frances Rabinowitz Interim Superintendent."— Presentation transcript:

1 Budget Plan Bridgeport School District January V7 Frances Rabinowitz Interim Superintendent

2 AGENDA  Fiscal Goals  School Improvement Priorities  Budget Overview:  Core Educational Components  Budget Overview:  Requested Appropriation  Non-Discretionary Costs  Discretionary Funding  Priorities if Discretionary Funding is Received January Mission Statement The mission of Bridgeport Public Schools is to inspire our diverse community to work together in order to serve our students. We will support the development of excellent leadership, and utilize our unique resources to challenge and cultivate well-balanced individuals who seek knowledge and make significant contributions to society throughout their lives.

3 FISCAL GOALS  Structurally Balanced Budget  Comprehensive Financial Plan  Accountability – Transparency, Integrity and Stability  School-based Budgeting Model  Comprehensive Fiscal Analysis, Internal Control and Innovation January

4 FISCAL GOALS January A Structurally Balanced Budget A fiscally prudent, balanced budget that ensures real cost management and the most effective educational program possible. 2. A Comprehensive Financial Plan A comprehensive plan, encompassing all fund sources, in which fiscal resources are aligned with the District’s school improvement priorities and strategies 3. Accountability through Continued Transparency, Integrity and Fiscal Stability 4

5 FISCAL GOALS 4. SCHOOL-BASED BUDGETING MODEL  School Staff Allocation Model: equitable and uniform formulas, with consideration for school- specific needs  Operating Allocation  $30/student  Continued Option: deployment of discretionary funds for part-time personnel (hourly, per diem); e.g., interventionists, tutors etc.  Teacher’s Choice Allocation (classroom teachers)  $30/teacher [based on first payroll, October 2015]  School Specialty E-card (distributed via )  Parent Involvement [Grant-funded]  $7/student  Elementary Schools: Title I; High Schools: State Priority Grant  Requires submission of a Budget Plan approved by: Principal, School Governance Council (SGC) Chair, PAC/PTSO President January

6 5. Comprehensive Fiscal Analysis, Internal Control and Innovation  Position control is regulated with rigor, to assure that all persons hired are matched to a properly funded vacancy.  Grant funds are utilized fully in compliance with applicable guidelines, through ongoing verification of proper charges to accounts.  Purchasing decisions are driven by the academic priorities of the district’s strategic educational plan; and only undertaken upon identification of the most cost-effective approach.  A focus on continuous improvement results in adoption of innovative approaches to strengthen operational efficiency and internal control. January FISCAL GOALS

7 School Improvement Priorities  Social and Emotional Development  Rigorous and Coherent Curriculum  Effective System of Interventions, including Special Education Prevention  Development of Parents and Community Members as Partners  Human Capital Investment (investment in recruiting a high quality and diverse teaching force) January

8 8 #THEORY OF ACTION 1 If we cultivate a Professional Learning Community led by exemplary leaders who acquire and apply knowledge of data process/analysis and an understanding of emotional intelligence, then all stakeholders will be able to make decisions that effectively inform instructional practices, and student achievement will increase. 2 If we implement a rigorous cohesive curriculum, which is authored by teachers and implemented with fidelity using scientifically based instructional strategies, then teaching and learning will improve and student achievement will increase. 3 If we continuously analyze our students’ academic and behavioral needs and respond with a systematic protocol of intervention and enrichment strategies and utilize pertinent resources, then all students’ achievement will increase. 4 If we systematically disseminate vital information to families and the community; such as district policies, structures and training, and strive to cultivate strong, equitable partnerships that empower all stake holders, then we will generate enthusiasm for learning and student achievement will increase. 5 If all members of the Board of Education support the efforts of the superintendent, staff and community to achieve excellence in each of our schools, and work as a coalesced body with the superintendent to secure resources that will enable our students opportunities to achieve academic excellence and emotional intelligence, then Bridgeport Public Schools will become a model urban district. SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PRIORITIES

9 BUDGET OVERVIEW: (Current School Year)  Budget Components  Core Educational Components January

10 Budget Components… January $6.7M - Priority $ – ESH $455,708 – Summer $214,416 – Bilingual I: $9.6M IIA: $1.9M III: $420,000 $14.7M$224,822,06 2 (without Alliance/ECS) General Fund $224.8M Alliance/ECS $14.7M State Grants: Priority (PSDG) + Bilingual Priority (PSDG) $7.76M Federal Grants: Title I Title IIA Title III * $11.9M * Excluding nonpublic school amounts

11 Core Educational Components  District Instructional Support Model  Curriculum, Instruction and Professional Development  Special Education and Support Services  SRBI Interventions  Technology January ○District Instructional Support Model  District Office: An organization dedicated to servicing schools for school improvement  New in : Directors of Literacy and Mathematics  Literacy Coaches: One in each elementary school; + Marin (Commissioner’s Network)  Math Coaches: 15 positions assigned to targeted schools + Marin (Commissioner’s Network)  Data Teams: focused on adult actions at grade, school and district level  Instructional Management Platform: Safari Montage  Benchmark Assessments: AimsWeb

12 January Core Educational Components ○Curriculum, Instruction and Professional Development  Continued development and implementation of cohesive curricula in all subject areas, for all students (including special education and bilingual/ELL)  HMH Instructional Materials: Literacy, Mathematics, Science o 5-year agreement o Payments #4 & 5 remain (net of pre-payments): Approximately $2.3M  HMH Consumables Replenishment – Elementary Schools o Approximately $600,000/year o Funding: Alliance/Title I  New Textbook Initiatives o Social Studies: May/June 2014 [$696,264]  Grades 7/8 Textbooks – McGraw-Hill  High School Social Studies Textbooks o ESL: On Our Way to English: August 2014 [$263,511]  17 Schools o High Schools: Specialized Courses – August 2014 [$77,961]  Forensics, Statistics, IB-Biology

13 January Core Educational Components ○Curriculum, Instruction and Professional Development  Teacher Evaluation Model: PhocuseD Learning – training for school administrators in teacher evaluation and using results to improve instructional practice.  High School Redesign: Pathways – Course and Service Development

14  Special Education and Support Services  Special Education: Administration by Zone  Five (5) supervisors assigned to schools by zone  Intensive support and monitoring  Socio-emotional Learning  RULER and PBIS [Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence] – a field-tested approach integrated into the curriculum and across the entire school, and aligned with PBIS [Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports].  Outcomes:  Improved student achievement and social skills; classrooms that become more supportive and student-centered; better school climate; decreased anxiety and depression; reduced likelihood of bullying January Core Educational Components

15 January o SRBI Interventions: Scientific Research-Based Intervention Tier I Tier 2 Tier 3 Social/Emotional Academics Wilson Reading Program 2-12 Wilson Just Words 4-12 Lexia CORE5 K-12 American Reading Company 9-12 Symphony Math K-12 Core Instructional Materials K-12 (Intervention Components) HMH/Holt MacDougall Positive Behavior Intervention System RULER Positive Behavior Intervention System Small-Groups Check In-Check Out Functional Behavioral Assessments Behavior Intervention Plans Core Educational Components Universal Screening Tool: AIMsWe b

16  Technology  District Technology Center: Up to date server technology  Apple ConnectED Grant: 5 Schools – Beardsley, Roosevelt, Johnson, PCM and Winthrop  Apple Server, IPADS for students and teachers, MacBooks for teachers  Wireless Infrastructure  Wireless Infrastructure in Schools: A focus on progressively increasing the number of wireless access points in classrooms.  January 2015: Addition of wireless access points in elementary schools, up to four (4), in grades classrooms, as needed  April 2015 – Fall 2015: Category 2 E-Rate Funding – Expected  Goal #1: Expand wireless access to ALL grades classrooms  Goal #2: Expand wireless access to ALL PK-K-1-2 classrooms  Computers in Schools:  Batalla and Blackham: Upgraded computer labs January Core Educational Components

17  Technology  Category 1 E-Rate Changes – District Action  Starting in , over a 5-year period, reimbursement for voice services will be reduced progressively from 90% to 70% ( ) and ultimately, zero.  In order to offset the loss of revenue, the district will:  Install IP phones where needed [IP phones do not incur voice charges.]  Select a “voice service” that includes long distance at no cost. January Core Educational Components

18 What is the Budget Request?  General Fund  Alliance/ECS January

19 Budget Overview… January $6.7M - Priority $ – ESH $455,708 – Summer $214,416 – Bilingual I: $9.6M IIA: $1.9M III: $420,000 $19,739,352$226,822,06 2 (without Alliance/ECS) General Fund Alliance/ECS State Grants Priority (PSDG) + Bilingual $7.76M Federal Grants * Title I Title IIA Title III $11.9M * Excluding nonpublic school amounts

20 Operating Budget Appropriation - Request January Appropriation Request STARTING POINT:  Appropriation (with Alliance): $239,526,866 ADD  Amount Needed for Non-Discretionary Costs: $ 7,034,548 Subtotal: $246,561,414 ADD  Amount Requested: Discretionary Services = $ 5,000,000 TOTAL = $251,561, Appropriation Request STARTING POINT:  Appropriation (with Alliance): $239,526,866 ADD  Amount Needed for Non-Discretionary Costs: $ 7,034,548 Subtotal: $246,561,414 ADD  Amount Requested: Discretionary Services = $ 5,000,000 TOTAL = $251,561, $7.0M is the minimum amount required in order to maintain services and manage growth (enrollment and new buildings).

21 Non-Discretionary Costs January AreaExplanationProjected Amount Collective Bargaining Agreements Salary Increases: Certified: contract Non-Certified: Pending – FY15 and FY16 $3,400,000 Health Insurance Projected 3-5% Increase$1,500,000 Enrollment Growth FCW…to Grade 12 BMA….to Grade 11 Elementary Schools $1,299,548 Special Education Increased, mandated needs Charter Schools $125,000 $ 70,000 Transportation Contractual Rate Increase Charter Schools Special Education Transportation – escalated costs OFFSET: New Transitional Program savings $465,000 $120,000 $955,000 - ($500,000) EST. Facilities/Utilities Custodial Services, Operational, Regulatory Opening of New Roosevelt & Black Rock Addition OFFSET: Anticipated BOE approval of increase in building rental fees OFFSET: Anticipated savings (staff turnover, overtime etc.) $1,500,000 - ($200,000) OFFSET Staff Turnover Savings – Projected [Turnover savings generally result when an employee retires and is replaced by a new employee at an entry level salary.] ($1,500,000) TOTAL$7,034,548

22 What’s NEW in the Budget Plan? January AreaDescriptionFund Source Arts EducationDirector, Arts Education position Turnaround Arts Grant (4 schools)… 75% District-wide Responsibilities………… 25% Alliance (redeployed funds from Achievement First Residency) BMA Add a Home-School Coordinator (BMA will grow to grade 11 in ) Priority Grant E-Rate Category 2 Category 2 funds the wireless infrastructure for connection to the internet at 85% reimbursement [Approximately $3M over 2-3 years] District Share (15%): $536,000 (est.) Objective: All classrooms will be wireless. Alliance School Security + 1 Guard at the FCW Campus (growth to grade 12) State HS Magnet Smart Start - PK The Smart Start PK Program will fund four (4) additional PK classes. The grant for operating expenses must be supplemented by district resources, in order to fund the PK teachers and paras. Title I SRBI Renew Lexia licenses, Alliance/Title I

23 Discretionary Funding January 2015 The district is requesting an additional $5M in discretionary funding. This sum is above the amount considered non-discretionary, in order to maintain current services and manage growth (enrollment and buildings). REQUEST: ADD $5M – discretionary funding The requested $5M would be utilized to fund ENHANCED SERVICES TO MEET THE DISTRICT’S HIGHEST PRIORITIES. The priorities are explained in the next section…… 23

24 PRIORITIES – DISCRETIONARY BUDGET INCREASE  $1M  $2M  $4M  $5M January

25 PRIORITIES – BUDGET INCREASE January $1M Service# Explanation Unit Cost Total (rounded)Notes Nurse 10.6 Add nurse positions, in order to have 1 full-time nurse in each school. $76,251$808,261District-wide Academic Interventionists27Per Diem teacher, 40 $180/day + medicare $ 7,304$197,208Elementary Schools TOTAL$1,005,469

26 PRIORITIES – BUDGET INCREASE January $2M Service# Explanation Unit Cost Total (rounded)Notes Nurse 10.6Add nurse positions, in order to have 1 full-time nurse in each elementary school $76,251$808,261Elementary Schools Academic Interventionists 27Per Diem teacher, 108 $180/day + medicare $19,722$532,491Elementary Schools Small Class Size Pilot – Grades K-1-2 5Pilot: Reduce class size from 24 in Grades K-1 and 29 in Grade 2 to 18. $75,000$375,000Elementary Schools – Teacher Positions, with benefits, prep coverage and absence coverage High Schools: Subject Area Coordinators 3Core Subject Area Coordinators: Teach 4 periods/day $75,000$225,000High Schools – Teacher Positions, with benefits and absence coverage Professional DevelopmentExpand in-district professional development opportunities $59,248District-wide TOTAL$2,000,000

27 PRIORITIES – BUDGET INCREASE January $4M Service# Explanation Unit Cost Total (rounded)Notes Nurse 10.6Add nurse positions, in order to have 1 full-time nurse in each elementary school $76,251$808,261Elementary Schools Academic Interventionists 27Per Diem teacher, 108 $180/day + medicare $19,722$532,491Elementary Schools Small Class Size Pilot – Grades K Pilot: Reduce class size from 24 in Grades K-1 and 29 in Grade 2 to 18. $75,000$375,000Elementary Schools – Teacher Positions, with benefits, prep coverage and absence coverage High Schools: Subject Area Coordinators 3Core Subject Area Coordinators: Teach 4 periods/day $75,000$225,000High Schools – Teacher Positions, with benefits and absence coverage Kindergarten Paraprofessionals – One per K Class 37Modify the allocation from 1 para: per 2 K classes to 1 para per K class. $52,000$1,924,000Elementary Schools – Paraprofessional Positions, with benefits and absence coverage TechnologyServers, chromebook carts and/or computer lab upgrades $135,248Instructional enhancement and SBAC testing TOTAL$4,000,000

28 PRIORITIES – BUDGET INCREASE January $5M Service# Explanation Unit Cost Total (rounded)Notes Nurse 10.6 Add nurse positions, in order to have 1 full-time nurse in each elementary school $76,251$808,261Elementary Schools Academic Interventionists 27Per Diem teacher, 120 $180/day + medicare $21,913$591,651Elementary Schools Small Class Size Pilot – Grades K-1-2 5Pilot: Reduce class size from 24 in Grades K-1 and 29 in Grade 2 to 18. $75,000$375,000Elementary Schools – Teacher Positions, with benefits and absence coverage High Schools: Subject Area Coordinators 3Core Subject Area Coordinators: Teach 4 periods/day $75,000$225,000High Schools – Teacher Positions, with benefits and absence coverage Kindergarten Paraprofessionals – One per K Class 37Modify the allocation from 1 para: per 2 K classes to 1 para per K class. $52,000$1,924,000Elementary Schools – Paraprofessional Positions, with benefits and absence coverage Technology - EquipmentServers, chromebook carts and/or computer lab upgrades $76,088Instructional enhancement and SBAC Special Education Students – Mainstreamed in General Education Classes 12Include self-contained special education students, who are mainstreamed >=40% in the general education classroom teacher allocation. $72,500/p Plus Transportation 1,000,000Elementary Schools: additional TR positions, plus transportation (if needed) TOTAL$5,000,000

29 AreaDescription Bilingual/World LanguagesAdd two (2) World Languages positions LiteracyNew Programs – Fundations, Time for Kids, myOn, core novels MathematicsStipends for professional development, curriculum development ScienceOngoing curriculum development NursingEstablish one full-time nurse per elementary school Occupational TherapyAdd two (2) positions to reduce caseload Parent CenterExpand training programs Physical Education, Athletics and Health Add a stipend for a Physical Education/Health Coordinator Establish three (3) full-time High School Athletic Directors Principals – High Schools Reading Teacher for Grade 9 Special Education Integrated Model: Add 1 SPED teacher per high school (Bassick, Central, Harding) Core Subject Area Coordinators: Reduce teaching load to 4 classes Add Guidance Counselors Add Deans of Students or Assistant Principals January SUMMARY OF BUDGET CONSULTATIONS Constituency Groups As part of the budget development process, the Superintendent and Senior Leadership Team conferred with the various constituency groups for input. A summary of proposed ideas follows.

30 AreaDescription Principals – Elementary Schools Modify the allocation from 1 para: per 2 K classes to 1 para per K class. Add nurse positions, in order to have 1 full-time nurse in each elementary school. Upgrade computers in grade K-1-2 classrooms. Add SRBI Interventionists Professional DevelopmentProfessional literature and on-line resources PsychologyAdd two (2) Psychologists School Security Add sub guards (above current allocation of 9) Add winter coats for school guards ($150/coat) School Volunteers Add part-time staff member to staff of 3 Special Education New instructional materials – Edmark Reading, TouchMath Adjust the resource paraprofessional allocation to release funds for redeployment to teacher positions Speech/Language High Schools: Expand Presence Learning (speech instruction through video sessions with certified speech providers) SRBI Lexia, Symphony Math: Add licenses Wilson Just Words and reading: Expand the program January SUMMARY OF BUDGET CONSULTATIONS Constituency Groups As part of the budget development process, the Superintendent and Senior Leadership Team conferred with the various constituency groups for input. A summary of proposed ideas follows.

31 APPENDIX: Grant-funded Services  Alliance/ECS  Title I  Title IIA  Priority January

32 ALLIANCE/ECS  Elementary Level: Intervention component of Prep/Enhancement Teacher Allocation  Reading and Mathematics Specialists  Guidance Counselors - Elementary Level  School/Media Specialists  Special Education/Resource Teachers – Prevention Component  District Academic Team  Executive Director - Elementary 30%: Executive Director – Elementary; Executive Director - Secondary; Director, Literacy; Director, Mathematics; Director, Bilingual/World Languages; Director, Health/Athletics/Physical Education  Computer Technicians (2)  Alternative School – Expelled Students  Twilight Program (combines with Priority Grant)  University Interns  Academic Intervention Services (per diem) January  Bridgeport Military Academy - JROTC Instructors, Security, Extended Day Tutoring  PHocuseD Learning: Training for Administrators (split with Title IIA)  Creative Youth Productions (CYP)  High School Academy Support [e.g., Harding – International Baccalaureate (IB), Certified Nursing Assistant, Culinary]  HMH Instructional Supplies - Annual Contractual Payment [5 year agreement: ] & Other Textbooks  Instructional Supplies [textbooks – register growth & replenishment, consumables] - split with Title I  Safari Montage: Instructional Management Platform  Technology: Document Management System, Kronos Time/Attendance, E-Rate  Computer Equipment  Discretionary operating allocation (schools) Note: as incorporated in the Operating Budget Plan $14.7M

33 STATE PRIORITY GRANT  District Office: Early Childhood Office: Director (50%,50% - Title I) and Clerical; Grants Office Staff  32 Kindergarten 50% (16 FTE)  Classical Studies Academy - Enrichment Teachers (4) and Extended Day  Reading Specialists  Mathematics Specialists  Today's Students, Tomorrow's Teachers  In-School Suspension Officers (18)  Attendance Intervention Officers - HS (3)  Computer Technician (1)  Alternative School – University School  Social Workers: Pregnant & Parenting Teens, District-wide Support  HS Twilight Program: 3:30 - 7:30 pm  High Schools: Credit Recovery (school year) January  University Partnerships: Early College Enrollment Programs  BPEF: MAACS College Mentor Program  VIP: Village Initiative Project (college tours)  Junior Responders Program  District Parent Center: Coordinator, Support Staff, Center Rental/Utilities & Activities  Parent Involvement-High Schools (parity with Title I per capita)  Home-School Coordinators: Bassick, Central, Harding, FCW  Computer Literacy teachers - Intradistrict Magnet Schools  College Board Readi-Step Program  BAYM – High Schools  Extended School Hours (ESH) – Barnum, Hooker, Waltersville  Summer Programs (SASS) $7.5M

34 TITLE I  District Office: Early Childhood Office: Director (50%, 50% -Priority), clerical; Grants Office staff  PreKindergarten: School Readiness - Excess Cost [3 teachers + 3 instructional assistants]  SMART START PK Program (new in FY16) – Excess operating cost for personnel  Reading Specialists  Mathematics Specialists  Bilingual Academic Intervention Services  Instructional Assistants (Kindergarten, bilingual) and Special Education Assistants  SRBI Materials and PD: AimsWeb, Wilson (split with IDEA); LEXIA - fully paid --- Reading, through ; Math, through  Computer Equipment  Instructional Supplies – Summer Program January  Instructional Supplies [textbooks – register growth & replenishment, consumables] - split with Alliance  Home-School Coordinators - Elementary Schools (22)  Family Resource Coordinators - Barnum, Batalla, Dunbar, Roosevelt  Coordinator, NNPS [National Network of Partnership Schools]  Parent Involvement -Elementary school allocations (1%)  Security/Custodial Fees - Parent involvement events  School Parent Rooms - Telephone Charges  PLTI: Parent Leadership Training Institute  Annual Parent Convention $9.6M

35 TITLE IIA  Grants Support Partner  Human Resources: School Support Specialist, Evaluation Mediator/Teacher Recruiter  Human Resources: Support staff for teacher recruitment & training  Human Resources: Liaison for University Partnerships (hourly)  Executive Director-Elementary Education, Director of Literacy, Director of Mathematics and Director of 20%  Education mentors: school leadership training (per diem)  Reading Specialists  Mathematics Specialists  Teach for America - New Teachers [split with Operating Budget] January  University Interns  New Teacher Induction/Orientation Activities  PHocuseD Learning: Training in Teacher Evaluation for Administrators (split with Alliance)  Protraxx: Continuing Education Software  Peer Observer Stipends  Professional Development Conferences: Special Education, Bilingual, other areas  Professional Development: International Baccalaureate Training for Harding HS  Professional Development Supplies/Materials $1.9M


Download ppt "Budget Plan 2015-16 Bridgeport School District January 2015 1 V7 Frances Rabinowitz Interim Superintendent."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google