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Hello UNT Graduate Students in Mechanical and Energy Engineering.

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Presentation on theme: "Hello UNT Graduate Students in Mechanical and Energy Engineering."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hello UNT Graduate Students in Mechanical and Energy Engineering

2 Avoiding Plagiarism in Scientific Writing

3 This Workshop Brought to You by UNT Writing Lab ( ) Discovery Park Graduate Writing Support Center ( )

4 A Presidential Candidate Plagiarizes Vice President Joseph Biden (1988)

5 What Dishonesty Is By Authors By Referees By Editors

6 M. C. LaFollette, Stealing into Print : Fraud, Plagiarism, and Misconduct in Scientific Publishing. Berkeley: U of California Press, 1992, p. 42. “ By authors: Describing data or artifacts that do not exist. Describing documents or objects that have been forged. Misrepresenting real data, or deliberately distorting evidence or data. Presenting another’s ideas or text without attribution (plagiarism), including deliberate violation of copyright. Misrepresenting authorship by omitting an author. Misrepresenting authorship by including a noncontributing author. Misrepresenting publication status. ” [1]

7 M. C. LaFollette, Stealing into Print : Fraud, Plagiarism, and Misconduct in Scientific Publishing. Berkeley: U of California Press, 1992, p. 42. “ By referees: Misrepresenting facts or lying in a review. Unreasonably delaying review in order to achieve personal gain. Stealing ideas or text from a manuscript under review. ” [2]

8 M. C. LaFollette, Stealing into Print : Fraud, Plagiarism, and Misconduct in Scientific Publishing. Berkeley: U of California Press, 1992, p. 42. “ By editors or editorial advisors or staff: Forging or fabricating a referee’s report. Lying to an author about the review process. Stealing ideas or text from a manuscript under review. ” [3]

9 UNT Policies You Should Know Student_Affairs-Academic_Integrity.pdf Student_Affairs-Academic_Integrity.pdf

10 May 2009; 5 students; 1 instructor Plagiamester

11 Sigma Xi ethics

12 Plagiarism Is Detected By

13 Plagiarism Is Detected By

14 Learn of Any Plagiarism You May Be Committing: Discovery Park Students Plagiarism Self-Check Class ID: Password: writelab

15 Citing Your Sources e_Reference_Table.pdf e_Reference_Table.pdf

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18 RefWorks and Write-N-Cite

19 A Little Literature Review

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24 L.B. Spencer, “The Onus of Originality: Innovation, Imitation, and Other Problems of Writing,” in The Plagiarism Plague: A Resource Guide and CD-ROM Tutorial for Educators and Librarians, Vibiana Bowman, Ed. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2004, p. 16. “[T]he culture of the business world, which is product based, conflicts with the culture of the educational world, which also emphasizes process” [4].

25 L.B. Spencer, “The Onus of Originality: Innovation, Imitation, and Other Problems of Writing,” in The Plagiarism Plague: A Resource Guide and CD-ROM Tutorial for Educators and Librarians, Vibiana Bowman, Ed. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2004, p. 17. “For the science student, original effort, rather than original expression, is the key to doing a good job. How she conducts her experiment … is the parallel to ‘putting it in your own words.’” [5]

26 R. J. Lackie and M. D’Angelo-Long, “It’s a Small World?: Cross-Cultural Perspectives and ESL Considerations,” in The Plagiarism Plague: A Resource Guide and CD-ROM Tutorial for Educators and Librarians, Vibiana Bowman, Ed. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2004, pp. 35–36. “The issue of plagiarism becomes much more complex when dealing with students who do not have a grasp of general vocabulary and rhetorical patterns and who have difficulty with punctuation, grammar, and general mechanical correctness. They are more likely to imitate and, at times, ‘steal’ in an effort to complete assignments that often require higher level [English writing] abilities than they possess” [6].

27 R. J. Lackie and M. D’Angelo-Long, “It’s a Small World?: Cross-Cultural Perspectives and ESL Considerations,” in The Plagiarism Plague: A Resource Guide and CD-ROM Tutorial for Educators and Librarians, Vibiana Bowman, Ed. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2004, pp. 37–38. “In our English composition classes, we have both encountered ESL students who claimed that using some expert’s words or works was a sign of ‘utmost respect’ in their country. We have had to teach our students that in our country, directly quoting or paraphrasing someone’s work without using quotations or citations is plagiarism. Students who come from a country where plagiarism definitions differ, or where it is supposedly not addressed at all, have a lot of catching up to do. We need to teach them that in America, words are the currency of academia and that we can no more steal them than steal a person’s lawnmower, for instance, without getting into trouble. Teaching someone to piece together sentences and paragraphs from others’

28 R. J. Lackie and M. D’Angelo-Long, “It’s a Small World?: Cross-Cultural Perspectives and ESL Considerations,” in The Plagiarism Plague: A Resource Guide and CD-ROM Tutorial for Educators and Librarians, Vibiana Bowman, Ed. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2004, pp. 37–38. [continued] works—without properly acknowledging their contributions—is the wrong way to teach ESL students to write. Every student must eventually learn when and how to cite properly when borrowing words or ideas” [7].

29 R. J. Lackie and M. D’Angelo-Long, “It’s a Small World?: Cross-Cultural Perspectives and ESL Considerations,” in The Plagiarism Plague: A Resource Guide and CD-ROM Tutorial for Educators and Librarians, Vibiana Bowman, Ed. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2004, pp. 41–42. “Are there plausible solutions and/or considerations that we as teachers and librarians can implement and discuss to assist ESL students in becoming better academic writers? Glenn Deckert’s considerable experience teaching composition courses in Hong Kong to Chinese ESL undergraduate students led to his conclusion that most ‘overuse source material through an innocent and ingrained habit of giving back information exactly as they find it’” [8].

30 R. J. Lackie and M. D’Angelo-Long, “It’s a Small World?: Cross-Cultural Perspectives and ESL Considerations,” in The Plagiarism Plague: A Resource Guide and CD-ROM Tutorial for Educators and Librarians, Vibiana Bowman, Ed. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2004, p. 45. “Our experience shows us that one of the best antiplagiarism strategies is to discuss initially with our students the beneficial aspects of proper attribution of source material within their papers, an idea we believe is even more essential when dealing with L2 students. For instance, citing material from professional magazines and Web sites and scholarly journals and books can provide just the expert testimony needed to solidify and support their points or opinions stated within their papers. Unfortunately, as Harris explains, ‘many students do not seem to realize that whenever they cite a source, they are strengthening their writing … in a nutshell, citing helps make the essay stronger and sounder and will probably result in a better grade’” [9].

31 S. Senders, “Academic Plagiarism and the Limits of Theft,” in Originality, Imitation, and Plagiarism: Teaching Writing in the Digital Age, C. Eisner and M. Vicinus, Eds. Ann Arbor: U of Michigan Press, 2008, p “I was struck by my students’ skepticism about their own writing and ‘voice.’ They seemed so sure that they had nothing to say, and no voice to say it in, that I wouldn’t notice that the papers were not theirs. Their skepticism certainly clarified my task: to help them realize that they might have something to say and a way to say it” [10].

32 S. L. Montgomery, “The Scientific Paper: A Realistic View and Practical Advice,” in The Chicago Guide to Communicating Science, Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2003, pp. 92–93. “ Citations in a Scientific Paper: Their Meaning and Use Citing other authors in a paper does several things. First, it offers accountability. It tells the reader that you are familiar with the most recent, significant literature in your area and that this literature has aided you in your work. Second, citation is a way to outline a community of like investigators—a collegium, if you will. Third, citations are a tool by which you express various degrees of agreement and disagreement toward the work of others within this community:

33 S. L. Montgomery, “The Scientific Paper: A Realistic View and Practical Advice,” in The Chicago Guide to Communicating Science, Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2003, pp. 92–93. (continued) colleagues can be cited favorably (‘the excellent work of Barnes et al. 1987’), unfavorably (‘Delpy [1994] failed to consider’), flatly (‘has been the subject of numerous studies, e.g. Batts 1978; Resin et al. 1983; Foresby 1985, 1992’), and in qualified fashion (‘the work of Jensen et al. [1998] requires further support’). Most documents employ several of these types—they are how scientist-authors rank their cohorts and competitors and position themselves toward them. Fourth, citation is also a way for making certain claims to originality …” [11]

34 J. Salmons, “Expect Originality! Using Taxonomies to Structure Assignments that Support Original Work,” in Student Plagiarism in an Online World: Problems and Solutions, T. S. Roberts, Ed. Hershey: ICI Global, 2008, p Salmons’ Plagiarism Scale Dishonest to Honest Academic Dishonesty (intentional plagiarism, i.e., stealing/concealing) Inappropriate Paraphrasing (patchwriting) Misuse of Sources (inadvertent plagiarism) Uncritical Thinking (throwing in sources mindlessly) Intertextuality (discussion) Original Work (contribution to the field) [12]

35 How To Avoid Plagiarism Start on projects early. Keep a journal; write every day; bring it to your lab work. Cite as you go Refworks Write-N-Cite Have a sufficient number of sources Read Primary sources (original research) Secondary sources (reviews and critiques of research) Come to the writing lab (B112). Get off alone to think and work. Use a Thesaurus to learn vocabulary.

36 How To Avoid Plagiarism Add extrinsic organization when paraphrasing a), b), c), or 1), 2), 3) first, second, third Write 1 sentence before your paraphrase and 1 sentence after your paraphrase. Bring variety to your communicative language, while keeping the terminology consistent with sources.

37 How To Avoid Plagiarism Perhaps, for your IMRAD paper, compose in this order: MR. DITA

38 References [1–3] M. C. LaFollette, Stealing into Print : Fraud, Plagiarism, and Misconduct in Scientific Publishing. Berkeley: U of California P, [4–5] L.B. Spencer, “The Onus of Originality: Innovation, Imitation, and Other Problems of Writing,” in The Plagiarism Plague: A Resource Guide and CD- ROM Tutorial for Educators and Librarians, Vibiana Bowman, Ed. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2004, pp. 13–24. [6–9] R. J. Lackie and M. D’Angelo-Long, “It’s a Small World?: Cross-Cultural Perspectives and ESL Considerations,” in The Plagiarism Plague: A Resource Guide and CD-ROM Tutorial for Educators and Librarians, Vibiana Bowman, Ed. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2004, pp. 35–48.

39 References [10] S. Senders, “Academic Plagiarism and the Limits of Theft,” in Originality, Imitation, and Plagiarism: Teaching Writing in the Digital Age, C. Eisner and M. Vicinus, Eds. Ann Arbor: U of Michigan P, 2008, pp. 195–207. [11] S. L. Montgomery, “The Scientific Paper: A Realistic View and Practical Advice,” in The Chicago Guide to Communicating Science, Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2003, pp. 78–98. [12] J. Salmons, “Expect Originality! Using Taxonomies to Structure Assignments that Support Original Work,” in Student Plagiarism in an Online World: Problems and Solutions, T. S. Roberts, Ed. Hershey: ICI Global, 2008, pp. 208–226.

40 Next: Questions Interactive Writing and Citing Exercises

41 Thanks UNT Graduate Students in Mechanical and Energy Engineering


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