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What does this Emblem suggest?

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Presentation on theme: "What does this Emblem suggest?"— Presentation transcript:

1 What does this Emblem suggest?

2 What does this Emblem suggest?
Crown Scottish Thistle Tudor Rose

3 Did James I deserve his nickname “The Scruffy Stuart”?
Learning Objectives: To learn about how the Stuarts became England’s monarchy. To identify why James I was called ‘the Scruffy Stuart’. To compare James’ reception with attitudes at his death.

4 What does this tell us about James I?
The Scruffy Stuart???

5 Title: The Scruffy Stuart? Date: __________
Read through the information on the A3 sheet and then answer question 1 on page 79 in full sentences We will be going through the question and I will be asking people to read out their answers to the class so BE READY!

6 Using the A4 sheet... Read through the sheet as a class
Answer all of the questions in full sentences (use the sentence starters to help you with question 4)

7 What do YOU think? Voting Time!
James I deserved his nickname ‘the scruffy Stuart’. James I was not a very successful king.

8 Questions for picture reveal
What was James I of England’s other title? Why was James VI of Scotland made King of England? What was James I nickname? What did James say was his reception on arrival? Why was James not a successful King? How long did he send Parliament away for?

9

10 Title: Were the Gunpowder Plotters Framed?
Learning Objectives To assess evidence for and against the gunpowder plotters To evaluate the reliability of the evidence To come to a conclusion as to the guilt of the plotters

11 Were the gunpowder plotters framed
Were the gunpowder plotters framed? Read through the information in your evidence pack and use it to fill in your detective sheet Make sure you do it in full as you will need the information later!

12 Were the gunpowder plotters framed?
Point There is evidence to suggest that the gunpowder plotters were framed because ... Evidence My evidence for this is ... Explain This shows me that the gunpowder plotters were framed and that ...

13 Were the gunpowder plotters framed?
Point However there is also evidence to suggest that the gunpowder plotter were not framed because ... Evidence My evidence for this is ... Explain This shows me that the gunpowder plotters were not framed and that ...

14 Were the gunpowder plotters framed?
Point Overall I believe that the gunpowder plotters were/were not framed. Evidence This is because ... Explain I think that this proves that ...

15 Remember, remember the 5th of November, Gunpowder treason and plot, I see no reason why gunpowder, treason, Should ever be forgot.

16 What can we tell from this picture?
Look at his facial expression, what kind of person do you think he is? Try and make out the background, what does this suggest? Look at how he is standing? What does his suggest? Look at his clothes, what impression do you get? What is around his neck? And what does this show about him?

17 Title: Why did the English Civil War start?
Learning Objectives: To know the causes of the civil war To understand the different groups involved To be able to prioritise and group the causes

18 Parliament V the Crown! In 1642 thousands of Englishmen went to war. They weren’t going to fight the French, the Spanish or any other foreign country. They went to fight EACH OTHER! For years Parliament and the Monarch, James I and then his son Charles I, had battled about how to run the country, now they were going to war over it!

19 Copy this table into your books
The King (Royalists) Parliament (Roundheads) Other Reasons

20 Why did the English Civil War start?
In pairs you will investigate this mystery. As you investigate, collect your evidence in your table... Who or what was responsible for the outbreak of the Civil War? The King Parliament Other Reasons

21 The King (Royalists) Parliament (Roundheads) Other Reasons
Charles was angry with Parliament for attempting to reduce his power and tried to arrest MP’s When Parliament did not do as Charles wanted in 1629 he dismissed them. The King was very powerful Charles married Henrietta Maria who was catholic King believed in the ‘Divine right of Kings’ A lot of money was spent on wars so Charles wanted to raise taxes Parliament Got angry with Charles and they wrote a long list of all the things he did wrong Parliament tried to take away some of the Kings Power Cromwell was furious that Charles had not agreed to change and make things better Oliver Cromwell was Puritan and an MP and a talented soldier There were many wars that were extremely expensive including battles with Scotland Cromwell set up a new model army The Archbishop, who was appointed by Charles, made changes to the church that made ceremonies more Catholic Middle class people wanted more of a say in how the country was run Puritans wanted religion to be simple England was Protestant

22 In your books... Choose the most important reason for the outbreak of civil war in your opinion and tell me why Then choose the least important reason and tell me why You must use full sentences

23 How different were the two sides? Complete the double bubble tool below
Catholics Protestants

24 Title: Who fought in the Civil War?
The Roundheads fought on the side of Parliament. They wanted the King to have less power. Many of these men were Puritans- a religious group that Charles had not been kind to. The Cavaliers supported the King and were known as Royalists. They tended to be Catholics and Anglicans. They believed Parliament should not try and reduce the King’s power.

25 Title: Who fought in the civil war?
Learning Objectives To know who the two sides were To understand who fought in the civil wars To be able to comment on which side you would rather be part of and why

26 Royalists V Parliamentarians Copy into books and decide which statement is which belongs to which group The King is chosen by God – he has a divine right to rule Parliaments job is to follow the Kings commands No King of England should marry a foreign Catholic The King is there to serve his country – not the other way around One man cannot govern an entire nation

27 Royalists V Parliamentarians Copy into books and decide which statement is which
The King is chosen by God – he has a divine right to rule (Royalist) Parliaments job is to follow the Kings commands No King of England should marry a foreign Catholic (Parliamentarian) The King is there to serve his country – not the other way around One man cannot govern an entire nation

28 Royalists V Parliamentarians Copy out into your books
Royalists - A royalist supports a particular monarch (in this case Charles I) as the rightful leader of a country Parliamentarian – A supporter of Parliament, believe that the country should be governed by a group of elected people and that the King is there to serve the country.

29 Who fought?

30 Which side? Not many people got to chose which side they fought for
It usually meant you fought for which ever group got to your village first! Friends might end up fighting each other, fathers fighting sons! It was awful But you have a choice: Which side would you prefer to be on and why?

31 Title: Was the New Model Army a success?
Learning Objectives Complete the Single bubble that describe a soldier To know what the new model army was To understand the reasons why it was formed To be able to comment on how it was run and if it was successful Soldier

32 Battles! The first major battle of the civil war was at Edgehill in 1642 and it ended in a draw! The King’s cavalry performed well and Parliament realised that they needed a better army if they were going to win the war! Oliver Cromwell, a member of Parliament and Roundhead Commander, was given the job!

33 Battles! This new set of troops would be England's first ever professionally trained army! It was to be called “The New Model Army” Parliament wanted it to be the best so training was tough!

34 Laws of the Army Read through the LAWS of the new model army
Underline any words you do not know In one colour highlight any laws that you think are fair In another colour highlight any laws which you think are strange or odd

35 On May 5 1645 King Charles decided to give up the fight .
These men were strictly trained and strictly disciplined. But above all, they fought for God. Singing hymns, they charged into battle and their discipline proved too much for Rupert’s Cavalry, for although the cavaliers were good horsemen, they were not always good soldiers Give me a russet coated captain who knows what he fights for and loves what he knows, than that which you call a gentlemen and is nothing else Cromwell taught his cavalrymen to care for their horses and clean their weapons...regular training and strict discipline made his cavalry easier to control than the Royalist cavalry The New Model Army proved how good it was by winning important battles. At Naseby the Kings army was almost wiped out by a series of clever moves and brave changes by Cromwell's men. On May King Charles decided to give up the fight .

36 Was the new model army a success?
Give 3 reasons why you think the new model army was a success:

37 Multi-Flow Map! Effect Causes Major Event The Civil War Root Causes
Cause and Effect: The major function is to show causes- which can be sorted by root , immediate, proximal or long term causes- and their effects in relation to a major event; can be indefinitely expanded to include multiple cases.

38 Title: Why was Charles I executed?
Learning Objectives To know how the civil war came to an end To understand the events that led to the trial of Charles I To be able to successfully complete an assessment next lesson

39 How did the civil war end?
On 5th May 1645 Charles I decided it was time to give up He surrendered to the Scottish but they sold him to Parliament for £400,000 Charles was taken to Carisbrook Castle on the Isle of Wight as a prisoner of Parliament

40 Parliament had lost all confidence in their King and so met with him to discuss what would happen next. They voted on what to do with the King – whether to give him another chance or not. However Cromwell stopped certain voters from entering Parliament ... ..So by 26 votes to 20 it was decided to put Charles on trial for treason. The trial was to take place on Saturday 20th January 1649.

41 Question time! Who won the civil war? Why did they win?
What happened next?

42 Sources are incredibly important when studying history as they give us a real insight into what happened at the time! Look through the sources and answer the questions

43 Task 1: Answer questions 1,2, and 3 using the sources
Charles I was put on trial in 1649 because .... Parliament called Charles a traitor because ... Charles I answered the charges against him by Parliament by...

44 Task 2: Complete the table
Sources Evidence that the trial and execution were popular Evidence that the trial and execution were unpopular E F G H I

45 Task 2: Question 2 How far did the people of England support the
trial and execution of Charles I? The people of England supported the execution of Charles I because: give 2 reasons The people of England did not support the execution of Charles I because: give 2 reasons Overall, I think that the people of England did / did not support the execution of Charles I because

46 Watch the video clip and watch the reaction of the people in the crowd

47 Complete the thought bubbles

48 Why was Charles I executed?
Belief in his own divine right to rule He lost the Civil War Ruled without Parliament Oliver Cromwell Think about why these things led to the execution of Charles I

49 The Execution of Charles 1st
Multi-Flow Map! Major Event The Execution of Charles 1st Root Causes Causes Effect Cause and Effect: The major function is to show causes- which can be sorted by root , immediate, proximal or long term causes- and their effects in relation to a major event; can be indefinitely expanded to include multiple cases.

50 On the back of your sheet their is a writing frame to help you.
Your essay should be ¾ of a side of your book minimum. Look at the level descriptors to see what you need to include to do better than your last assessment. You have the rest of this lesson to complete the assessment.

51 Level 3 Describes in simple terms some reasons for the execution of King Charles I. Level 4 Describes with some details the reasons for Charles’ execution. Mentioning some of the following: the role of Oliver Cromwell and the New Model army, Charles’ policy to rule without Parliament and his belief in his own divine right to rule. Level 5 Explains in detail the reasons for his execution. Gives detail and explanations on some of these reasons. Attempts to write a conclusion summing up what they have found. Level 6 Explains in detail the reasons behind Charles’ execution. Gives detail and explanations of these reasons, using evidence to support their comments. Reaches a clear conclusion on the main reason. Level 7 Explains in detail the reasons for Charles’ execution and can comment on how the reasons are linked. Gives detail and explanations of these reasons, using evidence to support their comments. Reaches a clear conclusion on the main reason. Demonstrates evidence of independent study and individual style.

52 Title: The Man who banned Christmas!
Learning Objectives To know who Oliver Cromwell was To understand how he ruled England To produce a timeline of events What does this man look like?

53 These portraits are both of Oliver Cromwell, why might they be so difference?

54 Republic: a country that is not ruled by a King or Queen
On the morning of 31st January 1649, the people of England and Wales woke up to something they had never experienced before ... They had no KING!!! Or Queen! The moment the Kings head hit the floor the previous day Britain became a republic. Republic: a country that is not ruled by a King or Queen Nobody really knew what to do without a King or Queen so they looked towards the most powerful man in England to help them! Oliver Cromwell.

55 Cromwell was a farmer, Member of Parliament and a Puritan
Does anyone know what a Puritan is? Puritan: People who read the bible very carefully as they believed it taught them how to lead their lives Puritans tried to lead very simple lives. They didn’t believe in sports or entertainments and dressed in plain clothes as they thought al of these things distracted people from worship. Christmas Day was even banned in No decorations! No Christmas pudding! Soldiers even went round all the houses to confiscate the meat!

56 What did a Puritan believe in? Why was Cromwell not a model Puritan?
However, Cromwell liked music and hunting, he played bowls and even drank, he was not really a model Puritan... What did a Puritan believe in? Why was Cromwell not a model Puritan?

57 Complete the Single Bubble tool below
What is a Puritan? Complete the Single Bubble tool below A Puritan

58 You are going to draw your own timeline of Cromwell’s life.
I have given you the outline and you must add the dates in the correct places! 1599 – Cromwell is born in Huntingdon, Cambridge 1616 – Cromwell attends Cambridge University 1620 – He marries Elizabeth Bourchier 1628 – Cromwell was elected member of Parliament 1629 – Cromwell attacks Bishops in Parliament 1640 – Cromwell elected MP for Cambridge 1642 – The English Civil war started and Cromwell raises a troop of Cavalry from Cambridge 1643 – Cromwell appointed Colonel of the Cavalry 1645 – The New Model Army is created 1648 – The Royalists are defeated by the New Model Army. Cromwell pushes for a full trial of Charles I for treason. 1649 – Charles I is executed with Cromwell's signature on the death warrant. The Council of the State of Commonwealth replaces the monarchy. 1650 – Cromwell is appointed Captain-General of the Commonwealth 1653 – Cromwell decides to rule without Parliament and is appointed as Lord Protector of the Commonwealth 1657 – Cromwell is offered the crown of England but refuses it 1658 – Cromwell dies and a state funeral (usually reserved for Royalty) is held. 1660 – The Monarchy is in control again and King Charles II takes control 1661 – Cromwell’s body is dug up and symbolically executed.

59 In the back of your books copy these numbers into a bingo square
1599 1629 1648 1661 1653 1658 1649 1657 1620

60 Title: The Merry Monarch returns
Learning Objectives To know who the Merry Monarch was To understand how the return of the Merry Monarch changed the country To be able to comment on London in 1660

61 29th May 1660 was a special day for King Charles II for two reasons!
It was his 13th birthday It was the day he returned to London after living abroad for almost ten years! Thousands of people lined the streets of London. England had a King once more! In your books note down why 29th May 1660 was important

62 Using the A3 sheet answer questions 2 and 3
Remember to write in full sentences Take your time with presentation and be careful of your spelling. Restoration is a key word so underline it when you write your definition

63 Design your own sign for a shop selling some of the new products available in London

64 Watch the you tube clip of Charles II from horrible histories
Who was the Merry Monarch and why did he get this nickname?

65 How different were Charles II and Cromwell
How different were Charles II and Cromwell? Complete the double bubble tool below Charles II Cromwell

66 What does ‘ring a ring a roses’ have to do with the Plague?
A ring a ring a roses A pocket full of posies A tishoo, a tishoo We all fall down

67 What does ‘ring a ring a roses’ have to do with the Plague?
Learning Objectives To know what The Plague was To understand what the causes and symptoms of the Plague were To be able to comment on how people tried to cure the disease

68 In 1603 a plague killed 40,000 people, in 1609 12,000, in 1625 35,000, and in 1636 10,000.
However in 1665 the plague was about to kill even more people! Eventually it killed 100,000 people. A ring a ring a roses A pocket full of posies A tishoo, a tishoo We all fall down Each line of this nursery rhyme has a hidden meaning linked to the plague using your cards match the meanings to the lines

69 A ring a ring a roses A pocket full of posies A tishoo, a tishoo
As well as the pus filled spots in the victims armpit and groins, a red rash and the victim had black spots all over the body. Some people thought the red rash looked like a red rose. A ‘posy’ was a bunch of flowers. People carried these around to try and make the air smell sweeter because they thought bad smells caused the disease. A ring a ring a roses A pocket full of posies A tishoo, a tishoo We all fall down Sneezing was one of the first symptoms of the plague. A high temperature, shivering, dizziness, vomiting, and aches and pains would soon follow. A comment on the amount of people who died from the plague.

70 People didn’t really know what caused the Plague. But now we do!
We know that the plague was a germ that lived in the guts of fleas, these fleas lived on rats and a single bite from a flea led to the plague and the victim usually died. Remedies to avoid the plague: Place a gold coin in vinegar for one day. Then put the coin in your mouth and keep it there. wrap a victim in woollen blankets until they are sweaty. Then cut a live pigeon in half and rub it on the boils. The boils should begin to shrink. Place a live frog next to a boil. The frog will suck out the poison, swell up and explode.

71 This is a second verse from Ring a ring a roses.
The King has sent his daughter To fetch a pail of water ah-tishoo, ah-tishoo We all fall down. This is a second verse from Ring a ring a roses. I would like you to write your own version.

72 Multi-Flow Map! Effect Causes Major Event The Plague Root Causes
Cause and Effect: The major function is to show causes- which can be sorted by root , immediate, proximal or long term causes- and their effects in relation to a major event; can be indefinitely expanded to include multiple cases.

73 Sticking with the themes of nursery Rhymes
What do you think this one is talking about? London's burning, London's burning. Fetch the engines, fetch the engines. Fire fire, Fire Fire! Pour on water, pour on water. London's burning, London's burning. Fetch the engines, fetch the engines. Fire fire, Fire Fire! Pour on water, pour on water. London's burning, London's burning. Fetch the engines, fetch the engines. Fire fire, Fire Fire! Pour on water, pour on water. Pour on water, pour on water. Pour on water, pour on water.

74 Title: What caused the Great Fire of London?
Learning Objectives To know the cause of the Great Fire of London To understand why the fire spread so quickly To be able to look at evidence and decide what we can trust

75 Using the evidence I have given you in you envelopes you are going to work out who started the Great Fire of London! Was it a Catholic or French plot or simply an unfortunate accidental fire? Find evidence of a plot! Evidence that someone started the fire on purpose and that someone wanted to burn down London! Who might it be? Which sources support this view? Find evidence that the fire was an accident! Perhaps no one started it on purpose. Where could it have started? Why did it spread so quickly? Which sources can you trust?

76 You will be expected to answer questions while you are watching!
You are going to watch a video that has been made describing the events of the Great Fire of London. You will be expected to answer questions while you are watching! So pay attention and don’t get too carried away with the music 

77 The evidence that the fire was a plot is:
The evidence that it was an accident is: I believe that the fire of London was a plot/accident. I think this because __________________________________________________ And __________________________________________________ A good source of evidence is __________________________________________________

78 How do we write a successful assessment?
Title: Was the Great Fire of London an accident or a plot? Learning Objectives To practice our writing skills To understand what makes a successful essay

79 Describes in simple terms some causes of the fire of London.
Level 3 Describes in simple terms some causes of the fire of London. Level 4 Describes with some details the causes for the fire of London. Mentioning some of the following: wooden houses that were close together, wind blowing in the wrong direction and Catholic plot Level 5 Explains in detail the causes of the fire. Gives detail and explanations on some of these reasons. Shows both sides of the argument (plot and accident). Attempts to write a conclusion summing up what they have found. Level 6 Explains in detail the causes of the fire. Gives detail and explanations of these reasons, using evidence to support their comments. Reaches a clear conclusion on the main reason. Level 7 Explains in detail the causes of the Great Fire of London and can comment on how the reasons are linked. Gives detail and explanations of these reasons, using evidence to support their comments. Reaches a clear conclusion on the main reason. Demonstrates evidence of independent study and individual style.

80 How do we write an introduction? What do we need to include?
Set the context – what is happening at the time? Brief introduction to the topic we are covering In 1666 a fire raged through the city of London causing devastation on a level never seen before. At the time the fire was blamed on ______________________________________. However, there is another argument that it was simply an accident caused by ___________________________________. I will assess the cause of the fire and come to a decision as to whether it was a plot or an accident.

81 How do we write in the main part of our answer?
What do we need to include? Paragraph 1 – evidence to show that it could have been a plot Paragraph 2 – evidence to show that it was an accident There is evidence to show that the fire of London was a plot arranged by _______________________. This is that ___________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________. I think that this shows that it was a plot because _________________________________________

82 I think that this shows that it was a plot because ____________
There is evidence to show that the fire of London was a plot arranged by _______________________. This is that ________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________. I think that this shows that it was a plot because ____________ There is evidence to show that the fire of London was an accident. There is evidence to show this because ____________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________. I think that this shows that it was an accident because ________

83 How do we write in the conclusion? What do we need to include?
Assess which argument is the strongest and come to a decision Overall I have decided the cause of the Great Fire of London was a plot/accident. I have come to this decision because ___________________________________________________ and ________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________.

84 Describes in simple terms some causes of the fire of London.
Level 3 Describes in simple terms some causes of the fire of London. Level 4 Describes with some details the causes for the fire of London. Mentioning some of the following: wooden houses that were close together, wind blowing in the wrong direction and Catholic plot Level 5 Explains in detail the causes of the fire. Gives detail and explanations on some of these reasons. Shows both sides of the argument (plot and accident). Attempts to write a conclusion summing up what they have found. Level 6 Explains in detail the causes of the fire. Gives detail and explanations of these reasons, using evidence to support their comments. Reaches a clear conclusion on the main reason. Level 7 Explains in detail the causes of the Great Fire of London and can comment on how the reasons are linked. Gives detail and explanations of these reasons, using evidence to support their comments. Reaches a clear conclusion on the main reason. Demonstrates evidence of independent study and individual style.

85 Title: Would you make a good Stuart Doctor?
Learning Objectives To investigate the health of Charles II To research and evaluate some of the treatments used by Stuart Doctors To assess our own decision making skills

86 Context (Background Information)
In Stuart times, approaches to medicine were a combination of different idea’s. Some were very clever ... But others were just crazy!!! Some Doctors were beginning to work out how the human body worked ...while others didn’t have a clue! One of the most widely used cures was ‘blood letting’ . This was based on an old Greek and Roman idea that too much blood in the body caused illness. The answer was to cut the patient and let the bad blood out and soon their body would be back to normal again. Needless to say it didn’t work, but that didn’t stop many of London’s famous Doctors trying it.

87 At 8:00 am on 2 February 1685, Charles II fainted!!!
It soon became clear that he was very ill. A dozen Doctors crowded around him, this was their chance to prove themselves as great Doctors. Actually Year This is YOUR chance to prove that YOU are great Doctors! If you succeed you will be reward ... If you fail...well no one wants the blame for killing the King of England!

88 Your Task! In groups you will be given a series of choices to make based on real treatments available at the time. Can you cure King Charles II?

89 2 February 1665 Make your decision now!
After collapsing, the King has been unconscious for two hours. As the Doctors arrive, he begins to wake up. He is in pain. Treatment 1 Do you? Open up a vein in his arm and drain 16 ounces of blood, then make him vomit? Do nothing and wait and see if he gets any better? Wash his hair in urine? Make your decision now!

90 Yes, this is what the doctors did 5 points
Treatment 1 Yes, this is what the doctors did 5 points You must do something – you are one of the King’s doctors – you can’t jut sit there 0 points Don’t be silly, this is a Stuart cure for ringworm. It might be worth a try though 3 points

91 2 February 1665 Make your decision now!
The King is just as bad! You must keep trying! Treatment 2 Do you? Bleed him again, perhaps another 8 ounces of blood from his shoulder this time? Shave his head and burn his scalp to make it blister? Pray?! Make your decision now!

92 The doctors did this too. Good thinking: 5 points
Treatment 2 This is what the doctors did. Bloodletting was the key to success ... Or so they thought: 5 points The doctors did this too. Good thinking: 5 points Not a bad idea, perhaps God would help him 2 points

93 3 February 1665 Make your decision now!
The King is speaking again but still feels poorly. He still faints occasionally but recovers sooner than he did before (maybe you have been doing something right?) Treatment 3 Do you? Suggest injecting him with antibiotics? Drain more blood and then pump a liquid up his bottom to make him empty his bowels? Leave him alone, he seems better today – perhaps he is getting well? Make your decision now!

94 Good idea. This is what the Kings doctors did. 5 points
Treatment 3 Antibiotics? They’d never heard of them. Nobody knows what you are talking about – be careful, some people might think you are a witch! Points Good idea. This is what the Kings doctors did. 5 points Sounds sensible doesn’t it? But you are missing a days bleeding 0 points

95 4 February 1665 He wakes up bright and early but collapses again at dinner time. He seems to be getting worse!  Treatment 4 Do you? Bleed him again – more than before today? Give him powdered human skull in a sweet drink – this is viewed by many as a super cure for any illness? Call another Doctor; perhaps he can help more than you. Some people are saying that herbal remedies can really work? Make your decision now!

96 This is what the doctors did 5 points
Treatment 4 Not a bad idea, but if you bleed too much you might put him ‘out of balance’ again 3 points This is what the doctors did 5 points Get another doctor! Don’ be ridiculous. The King’s doctors know what they are doing (even if he’s not getting better) 0 points

97 Make your decision now! 5 February 1665
The King is getting worse. He collapses again. He sometimes cries out in pain. The doctors are very frustrated. Treatment 5 Do you? Mash up the brain of a young man that has died violently, add some wine and horse dung and pour this over the Kings body? Carry out more bleeding – perhaps give him a laxative to empty his bowels? Force him to eat Peruvian tree bark, a general medicine used for fevers? Make your decision now!

98 Another good treatment, perhaps tomorrow? 2 points
A good treatment, but one for the plague. Perhaps worth a try though! 3 points Another good treatment, perhaps tomorrow? 2 points This is what the doctors did: 5 points

99 Make your decision now! 6 February 1665
The King is worse. The doctors think there is great danger that he may die. Perhaps there is one last chance? Treatment 6 Do you? Cut his gums open with a new nail, and then hammer the nail into an old oak tree? Give him some oriental Bezour stone – this is a substance found in the stomachs of Persian goats. Added to wine, it should stop all poisons? Stop treating him; nothing you do seems to have any effect? Make your decision now!

100 This is what the doctors did: 5 points
Treatment 6 A common treatment for toothache – I don’t think the King has toothache, but you never know! 2 points This is what the doctors did: 5 points You can’t stop treating him, he’s the King! 0 points

101 Shortly after noon he collapsed for the last time.
The King is dead! Shortly after noon he collapsed for the last time. The doctors failed to keep him alive. So who made a good Stuart doctor? I think our team were / were not good Stuart doctors because _______________________________________. I think I was / was not a good Stuart doctor because ____ _______________________________________________.

102 Title: The Last of the Stuarts!
Learning Objectives To know how the reign of the Stuarts came to an end To understand how the Stuarts were related To come to a decision as to who your favourite Stuart is! Complete your crossword using the information in front of you and your own knowledge

103 Who is your favourite Stuart Monarch and why?
Using the information on your table we are going to complete your worksheet: “The end of the Stuarts” Answer questions 4 and 5 Who is your favourite Stuart Monarch and why?

104 What are the key words in this question?
Title: How had Great Britain changed between 1603 and 1703? What are the key words in this question? Learning Objectives To cement our knowledge of the Stuarts To test our knowledge from the last half term To successfully complete an assessment

105 You will need to include:
An introduction on the way Britain was organised and run at the start of the Stuart dynasty (when James I was king! Remember the Scruffy Stuart!) Information on some of the big changes that occurred: The execution of Charles I and the rule of Cromwell The reasons that Parliament stepped in after James II had a son The Glorious Revolution (what was it?) and how things changed with William and Mary as King and Queen (The Bill of Rights) A conclusion on all the changes that had taken place You should all be aiming to get at least 1 sub level better than your last assessment e.g. If you got a 4c you should be aiming for AT LEAST a 4b

106

107 Hangman!!!

108 Title: How did England become the United Kingdom?
Learning Objectives To work sensibly and carefully in the classroom To gather information for ourselves To be able to comment on how the United Kingdom was formed

109 In what year was the Act of Union with Wales?
Question Time You will need to be able to answer these questions based on the notes you have gathered during the lesson In what year was the Act of Union with Wales? Which King made this act? How many counties was Wales divided into? Which King finally defeated Ireland? Even though the British population in Ireland was 25% how much of the land did they own? Name 2 things Irish Catholics could not do by order of the English Parliament What year had the English and Scottish shared the same monarch since? Who was the first monarch to call herself Queen of Great Britain? What was the name of the group of people who wanted the descendants of James II to rule Scotland? Who was Bonnie Prince Charlie?

110 You will be going on a tour of Ireland, Scotland and Wales!
Using your table you will move around the room and collect information. You will have 8 minutes at each table and then you must move round to the next one! Remember you will have to answer questions using only the information you have collected by at the end of the lesson!

111 Answer these questions based on the notes you have gathered
Question Time Answer these questions based on the notes you have gathered In what year was the Act of Union with Wales? Which King made this act? How many counties was Wales divided into? Which King finally defeated Ireland? Even though the British population in Ireland was 25% how much of the land did they own? Name 2 things Irish Catholics could not do by order of the English Parliament What year had the English and Scottish shared the same monarch since? Who was the first monarch to call herself Queen of Great Britain? What was the name of the group of people who wanted the descendants of James II to rule Scotland? Who was Bonnie Prince Charlie?


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