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Creating a “Customer Service” Culture in Your Catholic School Creating a “Customer Service” Culture in Your Catholic School Presented by: Frank Donaldson.

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Presentation on theme: "Creating a “Customer Service” Culture in Your Catholic School Creating a “Customer Service” Culture in Your Catholic School Presented by: Frank Donaldson."— Presentation transcript:

1 Creating a “Customer Service” Culture in Your Catholic School Creating a “Customer Service” Culture in Your Catholic School Presented by: Frank Donaldson President, Institute of School & Parish Development New Orleans, LA April 26, – –

2 WORKSHOP AGENDA  Background Information  What Is Customer Service?  Different World than 40 Years Ago  On the School Side  Roles in a Customer Service Environment  Creating the Customer Service Plan

3 It is the way a “customer” is treated when she calls the school office and needs information. It is the way a prospective family is treated when they come to the school for a tour – by everyone. It is the way school parents are greeted as they come to celebrate liturgy at school. It is the way students are treated in the classroom. 3 WHAT IS CUSTOMER SERVICE?

4 It is the way the teacher is treated when it is time for contract renewal. It is the way people are affirmed and commended on a regular and consistent basis. It is the way new families are welcomed in their first year. It is the way volunteers are appreciated. It is the way alums are invited back. 4 WHAT IS CUSTOMER SERVICE?

5 It is the way school families are invited to share their gifts in the Annual Fund. It is the way parents are communicated with in regards to tuition and fees. It is the way an athlete is treated on the basketball court. It is the way the Finance Council communicates with the whole school. It is everyone serving. 5 WHAT IS CUSTOMER SERVICE?

6 It is the way a school develops a relationship with a family. It is the way a Catholic school breaks down the “guarded kingdoms” that can poison a school’s effectiveness and quality. It is a shift in the way many Catholic schools need to operate – not to be in opposition to parents and other constituents, but to be in collaboration and coordination with them. 6 WHAT IS CUSTOMER SERVICE?

7 IT IS SYSTEMIC. LET’S EXPLORE WHY IT IS IMPORTANT. 7 WHAT IS CUSTOMER SERVICE?

8 KEY DEFINITION “A ‘customer’ is anyone who receives or is affected by the work you do. A ‘customer’ may be external or internal. Only they can determine what quality is, only they can say what they want and how they want it. Quality begins with the ‘customer’.”

9 DIFFERENT WORLD THAN 1970 First year of teaching -- De La Salle High School Waiting lists to get in to all four classes Technology was an opaque projector and a ditto machine with purple ink. Five lay teachers -- the rest were La Sallian Christian Brothers First year’s salary was $4, sophomore English classes + 1 geography Budget was balanced with tuition, subsidy and a good fund-raiser. 9

10 DIFFERENT WORLD THAN 1970 Today, there is competition from everywhere. 95% lay teachers Technology costs Academic advances Athletic advances Public relations and marketing have become key to future success. 10

11 DIFFERENT WORLD THAN 1970 The administration and board’s role have changed. President-Principal structures have thrived. Faculty has been invited to step forward beyond their field(s) of certification and into the world of public relations and marketing. Development/advancement offices have sprung up. Long-range planning has become a must. Enrollment Management is the new language. “Branding” your image is now crucial to name recognition. 11

12 DIFFERENT WORLD THAN and 8 figure endowments are now the keys to long term financial success. Facilities must keep up with the quality of education. Alums, parents, past parents, community, friends, and others are now important to success. And, “development” must mean more than selling candy bars and putting on bingo. And, “marketing” must be more than inviting your present parents to an Open House. 12

13 SERVING THE “CUSTOMER” PLAYS A MAJOR ROLE IN SUCCESSFULLY ADDRESSING THESE CHALLENGES IN CATHOLIC SCHOOLS. LET’S LOOK FURTHER ON THE IMPACT OF THIS TO OUR ENTIRE CATHOLIC CULTURE. 13

14 SAME OLD, SAME OLD In the past 25 years, more people have left the Catholic church than any other religion. (PEW Research) Whereas in the past, much of a family’s life was centered around the church and the school, today that is not the case with most families. 70% are not involved/engaged. Many continue to carry out the same “modus operandi” in areas such as: new parent welcome, asking for money, long-range planning, religious education, overall communication, stewardship and governance -- that they did 25 years ago. 14

15 SAME OLD, SAME OLD From the Statistical Report on Nation’s Catholic Schools released from NCEA, “The 2009 – 2010 school year saw a decrease of 73,190 students from the prior academic year. In that same reporting period, 24 new schools opened but 174 schools closed or consolidated. More than 1,800 Catholic schools have a waiting list for admission. Enrollment in Catholic schools has declined 20.1% since

16 SAME OLD, SAME OLD Some parishes/schools take the stance of “Believing leads to belonging” when the exact opposite is true: “Belonging leads to believing.” (Gallup Organization) With some parish/school leaders, the attitude is, “My way or the highway.” Many parishes minister to the ones sitting in the pews (30%) and many Catholic schools only work with those parents, alums and others who step forward and make the effort to become involved. 16

17 SAME OLD, SAME OLD We still think that we can balance the budget and provide the all-important ministries, programs, organizations, etc. through a generic envelope collection process, a fair/festival, tuition, a fund-raiser or two, and maybe a direct mail appeal. When we speak of a “cultural shift” in Catholic institutions, we often run up against a road block that says, “That will never work here. We’re different.” 17

18 SAME OLD, SAME OLD Many Catholic schools do not know how to address one of the major problems that greatly hinders a customer service culture – the many “guarded kingdom” or, in other words, “compartmentalization.” Not all individuals, groups, teams, clubs, organizations, councils, boards, and minds are on the same page. Quality question: How can a Catholic school advance and excel when all the messengers are not living and speaking the same message? We want things to be different, but we keep doing the same things over and over again. 18

19 MAJOR CHALLENGES Catholic schools face MAJOR challenges  Revenue and resources  Enrollment  Personnel  Leadership  Parish and school collaboration  Vision, mission, plans for the future  Facilities  “Guarded Kingdoms” 19

20 POINT OF UNDERSTANDING ISPD believes that in order to address and successfully solve these challenges, it is imperative that we shift the culture of our Catholic schools and parishes into being more “customer” oriented. In today’s economy people want choices; they want to be treated equally and fairly; they want quality; and, they want to feel part of a community that is making a difference – one that is welcoming, inviting and engaging. Today, parents, parishioners and donors are looking for benefits – what will best serve them and their family? 20

21 AGREE OR DISAGREE? A Catholic school will only attract the number of resources (financial, people, community, connections, etc.) that it deserves to attract. And, what it deserves to attract will always be in direct relationship to the quality of its programs, processes, people and “customer service” attitude. 21

22 22 FRAME OF REFERENCE  Definition of Development The meaningful involvement and engagement of people in your mission and vision for the future.

23 KEY DEFINITION “Quality Customer Service is the commitment of everyone – administration, councils, parents, parishioners, teachers, staff, students, board and all others – to meet the requirements of ‘customers’ in a collaborative manner.”

24 KEY DEFINITION “Total (everyone committed) quality (meeting the requirements of ‘customers’) management (in a collaborative manner) is the day-to-day belief and behavior of effective quality organizations.”

25 KEY DEFINITION “A ‘customer’ is anyone who receives or is affected by the work you do. A ‘customer’ may be external or internal. Only they can determine what quality is, only they can say what they want and how they want it. Quality begins with the ‘customer’.”

26 ISPD SUGGESTION S

27 BOARD/ADMINISTRATION IN A CUSTOMER SERVICE ENVIRONMENT Should see themselves as PR agents and spokespersons. Should always be positive; welcoming; and always promoting the mission, the value and the quality of their Catholic school. Should speak with every new family who comes for a visit. Should “macro-manage” the customer service plan for the school.

28 BOARD/ADMINISTRATION IN A CUSTOMER SERVICE ENVIRONMENT Should attend key events the school hosts to attract students. Should promote a quality customer service culture – one that views all internal publics as part of a systemic team. No guarded kingdoms. Should communicate the goals, progress, and successes of the customer service plan. Should personally invite the internal customers to get involved in building a customer oriented culture.

29 BOARD/ADMINISTRATION IN A CUSTOMER SERVICE ENVIRONMENT Should establish an on-going relationship with all internal customers of the parish/school. Should keep his/her finger on the pulse of the marketplace – always seeking to know the “customer” and how the market keeps changing. Should lead the charge in educating and proclaiming that ALL internal “customers” are vitally important in building a customer service culture.

30 FACULTY/STAFF IN A CUSTOMER SERVICE ENVIRONMENT The school faculty and staff should be educated on their role in a customer service culture. Should see themselves as positive ambassadors. Should understand that the ability of the school to attract and retain new families will be in direct relationship to the quality of the way they present themselves – in and outside of the classroom.

31 FACULTY/STAFF IN A CUSTOMER SERVICE ENVIRONMENT Should welcome visitors to the campus and make sure they are treated with kindness and given proper directions, if needed. Should encourage all to invite their family and friends to key events at the parish and/or the school. Should be encouraged to build a quality environment by always seeking to improve the various processes that make the place “hum.” No guarded kingdoms.

32 FACULTY/STAFF IN A CUSTOMER SERVICE ENVIRONMENT Should be involved in identifying areas of improvement and building the customer service plan. Should play an active role in enrolling new parish families and new school families. Should be invited to submit the latest “news” from their area.

33 FACULTY/STAFF IN A CUSTOMER SERVICE ENVIRONMENT Should be encouraged to implement the customer service plan and build a customer service culture. Should be educated on customer service and invited from Day # 1 to be part of the culture.

34 The phone receptionist should treat every call with the utmost courtesy. Should be properly trained on how to handle all types of calls. Should understand that she/he is usually the first impression someone has of the school. FACULTY/STAFF IN A CUSTOMER SERVICE ENVIRONMENT

35 Should seek to fulfill the needs of the caller, within reason. Should treat all phone calls with respect, confidentiality and care.

36 STUDENTS IN A CUSTOMER SERVICE ENVIRONMENT Students should be seen as one of the key customers in a quality customer service culture. Should be educated in regards to the important role they play in customer service. Should be invited to participate in on-campus activities that invite new students and families. Should be invited to help create the customer service plan for their school.

37 STUDENTS IN A CUSTOMER SERVICE ENVIORNMENT Should be encouraged to recommend and refer potential students and families. Should be encouraged to specifically invite potential students and families whom they know to key events and activities. Should be invited (2-3), if possible, to serve as interns to the customer service efforts.

38 38 PARENTS Parents should be educated on the value that the school places on customer service. Should understand that they, along with others, are key customers in a Catholic school – not THE customers. Should be encouraged to become involved in reaching out to ALL customers of that Catholic school.

39 39 PARENTS Should be invited to work with areas of expertise.  Web page design  Database creation  Graphic design  Sign maker Initially, new parents should be educated on the importance of their involvement in a customer service culture.

40 40 PARENTS Should be educated and encouraged to view the vision, mission and overall plan for the school’s advancement from a systemic point of view – and not just from the point of view of their guarded kingdom. Education on the value of the entire school operating as a T-E-A-M is crucial to future development and advancement.

41 INTEGRATING CUSTOMER SERVICE: THE PLAN Commitment from Leadership  Pastor  President  Principal  Board  Parent Leaders  Ministry leaders 41

42 INTEGRATING CUSTOMER SERVICE: THE PLAN The Core Team  Leads, Manages, Facilitates, Communicates  Mission-Driven  Hands-On, Active and Engaged  Monthly Action Items 42

43 INTEGRATING CUSTOMER SERVICE: THE PLAN Education and Communication  Outreach to key groups and organizations  Newsletter articles  Presentations  Web Site postings  Update bulletin   Fan Page on Facebook 43

44 INTEGRATING CUSTOMER SERVICE: THE PLAN People Fuel processes  Interviews  Input Sessions  New parent welcome  Neighborhood outreach  Phone outreach  Coffee and donuts  Principal’s Cabinet 44

45 INTEGRATING CUSTOMER SERVICE: THE PLAN Input Sessions  1 – 2 times per year  2-3 nights with 2-3 sessions per night  Very clear on what questions you will be asking  Random selection  Personal invitation 45

46 INTEGRATING CUSTOMER SERVICE: THE PLAN Customer Service Team  3-4 Workshops  Solve the Customer Service Challenges  Small Group Work  Prioritization  Bring results to the School-Wide Convocation 46

47 INTEGRATING CUSTOMER SERVICE: THE PLAN School-wide Convocation  Once every 18 months – solve the customer service challenges  Large group and small group work  Plugs parents, faculty and staff. Parents, students, alums, and friends into the life of the school and invites them to be ambassadors and stewards 47

48 INTEGRATING CUSTOMER SERVICE: THE PLAN Planning Component  Creation of a Collaborative Vision  All are Invited for Input  Quality Leadership  Ongoing Communication  Implementation is a MUST!  The Vision Comes Alive -- Ownership 48

49 49 SCHOOL LEADERSHIP “Office” CS Core TeamPeople “Fuel” Inter- views Input Sessions Surveys Facilitate Educate Implement “CUSTOMER SERVICE” INFRASTRUCTURE CUSTOMER SERVICE TEAM CUSTOMER SERVICE ACTION PLAN Question -naires Planning Sessions Cup of Coffee Mtgs. Relating to Feeder Sources Engaging Alumni Commun- icating CS Keeping Track of All Reaching Out to All Affirming Our Customers Seeking Input Using Social Media Educating the School Welcoming New Families

50 Customer Service Process: Present Situation Analysis (Step 1) Education of leaders SWOT Study with leaders and Core Team  ( S trengths, W eaknesses, O pportunities, T hreats) Review of school’s welcoming, inviting, engaging, and customer service processes 50

51 Customer Service Process: Organization, Communication and Input (Step 2) Education and organization of Customer Service Core Team Update Bulletin Presentations Administration Letter 51

52 Customer Service Process: Organization, Communication and Input (Step 2) Postings Web Site Presentations Newsletters s Fan Page 52

53 Customer Service Process: Input Sessions (Step 3) Randomly invite 200 people Personally invited w/follow-up Facilitated by the Core Team 4 Questions Reaches out to all 53

54 Customer Service Process: Input Sessions (Step 3) 1. In a Catholic school what does “customer service” mean to you? And, how important is it to you? 2. In regards to welcoming, inviting, creating a sense of belonging, and establishing a “customer service” environment, what are the areas of our school where you believe we are doing well? 54

55 Customer Service Process: Input Sessions (Step 3) 3. In regards to this topic, what/where are the areas that need the most improvement? 4. As we move forward to further establishing a “customer service” culture, what advice do you have for the Core Team working with this process? 55

56 Customer Service Process : School Wide Survey (Step 4) Sent to all parents Given out at faculty/staff meeting Given out to all students Posted on the web site Seeking information regarding: -Welcoming, inviting, engaging -“Warm” or “cold” school -Ways to engage 56

57 Customer Service Process : Creating the Plan (Step 5) Customer Service Team formed ◦ leaders (60%-40% rule) ◦ 3-4 workshops ◦ Concentration on solving the Challenges ◦ Challenges come from Assessment, Input Sessions, Surveys, Core Team input 57

58 Customer Service Convocation (Step 6) Large Group – everyone invited Overview of Challenges Randomly Divide into Small Groups Solve Challenges with Action Verbs Final Action Plan by Core Team 58

59 Customer Service Process : Implementation of Action Plan (Step 7) Implementation of Final Action Plan 1.Key challenges embraced by the Core Team (new parent/student welcome, communications, people involvement, etc.) Implementation teams formed to begin working on priorities and action strategies –chaired by Core Team 59

60 Customer Service Plan: Tangible Outcomes Greater involvement of people in the school Identified challenges with solutions Action Plan to address these challenges and solutions New leadership emerging Clearer plan for serving the “customer” 60

61 People Engagement Process : Tangible Outcomes Increase in numbers (people, students, resources) Awareness of the importance of customer service Consistent education Outreach to the 2 nd, 3 rd and 4 th ripples 61

62 ADVANTAGES OF THE PROCESS Keeps the concept of Customer Service in front of people throughout the year. Allows for ongoing education & communication Managed by the Core Team with annual evaluation Integrates into the culture 62

63 63 LET’S GO BACK TO THE CHALLENGES  Revenue and resources  Students in the desks/families who believe  Personnel  Leadership  Parish and school collaboration  Vision, mission, plans for the future  Facilities  Guarded Kingdoms

64 64 LET’S GO BACK TO THE CHALLENGES These can be solved efficiently and effectively in a “customer service” environment. “Pro- active” and “win-win” should not just be words in a presentation.

65 QUESTIONS & ANSWERS


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