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Education in The Medieval Era Presented by Rebecca Black and Amy Anderson.

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Presentation on theme: "Education in The Medieval Era Presented by Rebecca Black and Amy Anderson."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Education in The Medieval Era Presented by Rebecca Black and Amy Anderson

3 Imagine a time of lords and ladies, immense castles, and brave knights.

4 Imagine a era when land owners worked diligently to cultivate the fields and knights served the Feudal lord to protect the land.

5 Imagine a time when the main educational agency was the church where divinely sanctioned teaching rested on scripture and doctrine. Fountains Abbey, England

6 Imagine a time when reality was viewed as unchanging and stable without regard to working toward a better future – a time when all looked toward a better future as promised by the church.

7 Imagine yourself in the medieval era Ludlow Castle, England

8 Medieval Times  Religious values well defined  Political, Social and Economic values- fragmented  Education managed and maintained by the church

9 Three Types of Educational Institutions Clergy Preparation Clergy Preparation Chivalric Training Chivalric Training Craft and Vocational Education Craft and Vocational Education Three leveled system corresponding to the class structure – specific education for cleric, knights, and craftsmen Three leveled system corresponding to the class structure – specific education for cleric, knights, and craftsmen

10 Serfs  The largest group of the population- a permanently indentured agricultural class remained largely unschooled  Learning occurred as the observed their parents using the skills needed to survive

11 Church Related Schools  Access to education limited  Early in medieval era abbeys were directed to provided some education to “capable boys”  Male dominated  Directed at preparing priests and other clerics Mont-Saint Michel, France

12 Church Related Schools Four types of church related schools provided basic or elementary education –Parish –Chantry –Monastic –Cathedral

13 Parish Schools  A congregation served by a priest  Provided elementary education –Religious rituals –Music needed for the celebration of Mass –Secondarily : reading, writing and music

14 Chantry Schools  Supported by an endowment  Trained boys in Latin so that they could chant the responses needed in celebrating the liturgy

15 Monastic Schools  Trained monks either as priests or brothers –Church doctrine –Community regula –Reading, Latin, simple arithmetic, and religious doctrine and religious doctrine –Monasteries were literary, artistic and intellectual centers

16 Nunneries/ Convents  Religious and educational formation for future nuns  Usually beginning around the age of 7  Some girls returned to the secular world after completing their studies –Latin, singing, religious doctrine, embroidery, spinning and weaving, painting

17 Cathedral Schools  Result of the decline of monastic schools stimulated by the revival of the cities  Required of each Bishop’s church to maintain a school to educate priests, clerics and the poor  Offered both elementary and secondary education  General or liberal studies  Occasionally reading and writing in Latin

18 Castles Monasteries & Priories Cathedrals & Ministers Parish Churches Other Medieval Places of Learning

19 Chivalric Education  Early –Between the ages of 7 and 15 –Serve at the court of his father’s lord –Practiced manners and gestures of court life –Learned how to be a gentleman –Sing and play a musical instrument -maybe learned to read and write a vernacular language -maybe learned to read and write a vernacular language

20 Chivalric Education  Squire –Age 14 – 21 –Served as an attendant for the lord of the castle or one of the knights of the court –Professional skills of knighthood Hunting, warfare, care of armor, arms and horse -Cultural Aspects of knighthood singing, recitation, composing verse, exaggerated politeness, dancing, story telling, chivalric symbols, coats of arms singing, recitation, composing verse, exaggerated politeness, dancing, story telling, chivalric symbols, coats of arms

21 Chivalric Education  Knighthood –Age 21 –Inducted by an overlord and church officials -Dedicated to serving his lords

22 Vocational and Craftsman Education  Not formal schools but well defined –Apprentice –Journeyman –Master Craftsman Role of the Master Apprentice teach tradework diligently look after morals/religionkeep craft secrets provide food, lodging andobedient to the Master a small stipend Maybe teach reading and writing

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24 Medieval Universities  Historical Setting –Social –Political

25 Medieval Universities  Organization –Student Centered vs. Faculty Centered –At first, no permanent campus

26 Medieval Universities  Curriculum –Specialties –Degrees –Educational Philosophies

27 Medieval Universities  Links to Modern Times –Similarities –Differences

28 The Renaissance  Transition from medieval to modern  Revival of commerce and city life  Decline of the Roman Catholic Church  Shift in education mirrors political shift

29 The Renaissance and Education  Humanistic Educational Philosophy aimed at producing the well-rounded, liberally educated person –Classical Greek and Latin literatures led to a cultured person –Style of writing could lead to elegance of style and expression

30 The Renaissance and Education Women’s Education –Women of upper socioeconomic classes enjoyed more educational advantages  Provided by convent schools, tutors, or classical humanist court schools –Upper class families employed resident tutors  Instruction provided to both boys and girls –Large numbers of women remained uneducated

31 References  About.com. History of the medieval child. Accessed 11 September Available from b.htm b.htm b.htm

32 References  California State University at Pomona. The Educational Legacy of Medieval and Renaissance Traditions. Database online. Accessed 11 September Available from ais_home.html. ais_home.html ais_home.html  Cambridge University. Speaking Volumes: The Medieval Library. Accessed 11 September Available from medieval.html. medieval.html medieval.html

33 References  Cambridge University. A Brief History: The Medieval University. Accessed 11 September Available from medieval.html. medieval.html medieval.html  Education of medieval women. Accessed 11 September Available from html

34 References  Dartford Town Archive. Educational provision in medieval Dartford. Accessed 11 September Available from education.shtml  Gutek, G.L. (1995). A history of the western educational experience. Prospect Heights, Illinois.

35 References  Medieval-Life.net. (2000). Medieval education. Accessed 11 September Available from  Ross, D. & Britain Express.com. Medieval schools and universities. Access 11 September Available from Schools_and_Universities.htm

36 References  Sullivan, Eugene. An Academic Costume Code and An Academic Ceremony Guide. Accessed 11 September Available from on=Frequently_Asked_Questions3&Template=/ CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=8086#Histori cal. on=Frequently_Asked_Questions3&Template=/ CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=8086#Histori cal on=Frequently_Asked_Questions3&Template=/ CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=8086#Histori cal  Trueman,C. Medieval Education. Accessed 11 Septemeber Available from cation.htm cation cation

37 Music Credits The ensemble of old church music "Sreteniye". Ancient church singing of Bysantine, Georgia and Rus  English Renaissance Music by La Primavera. Published by Magnatune


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