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Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time Defining and identifying the roles of geographic references within text: Examples.

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Presentation on theme: "Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time Defining and identifying the roles of geographic references within text: Examples."— Presentation transcript:

1 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time Defining and identifying the roles of geographic references within text: Examples from the Great Britain Historical GIS project Humphrey Southall University of Portsmouth

2 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Outline history of GBHGIS – : HRS Doctoral research –October 1989-September 1991: Labour Markets DB project –October 1994: Start of initial GIS project –January 1997: Work starts on parish mapping –Five person team with varied funding –Spring 1998: $1/3m. from ESRC; two teams –Systematic computerisation of census data –October 2001: National Lottery funding begins –Creation of web site for ‘life-long learners’ –September 2004: End of current funding

3 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Original project: Computerising historical statistics Mapping historic boundaries Linking data to boundaries … which means we have lots of polygons

4 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Additional Digital Content –An edition of the census reports: –More census data, making c. 33m. data values in all –The introductory text from every census report (4,750 pp) as text –Guide to Census Reports: Gt. Britain (279 pp) –Descriptive text and maps: –Two Ordnance Survey one inch-to-the-mile series maps –Three descriptive gazetteers (c.5,500 pp/5m. words –The four best-known tours of Britain (1,972 pp) Gazetteer/authority list of administrative units –Defines entities and relationships in main system –Populated from existing sources: Youngs’ Local Administrative Units of England (1979 and 1991) Melville Richards’ Welsh Administrative and Territorial Units (1969) SCAN gazetteer of Scotland –NB another kind of ambiguity: which unit for a given place?

5 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Sources: Youngs’ Local Administrat- ive Units of England

6 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Descriptive Gazetteers John Bartholomew, Gazetteer of the British Isles (Edinburgh, 1887) –Covers the whole British Isles, including Ireland –Many short entries John Goring, Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales (Edinburgh, 6 vols., ) –Fewer but longer entries Frances Groome, Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland, (Edinburgh, 6 vols., ) –A collaboration with the Gazetteer for Scotland project –Broadly similar to the Imperial Gazetteer

7 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Examples from Bartholomew’s: A'an, or Avon, lake, S. Banffshire, among the Cairngorm mountains, 1½ mile long, at alt. of 2250 ft.; it is the head- water of river Avon: which see. Aasleagh, place, co. Mayo, 16 m. S. of Westport; p.o. Abbas and Temple Combe, par., mid. Somerset, 4miles S. of Wincanton sta., 1850 ac., pop Abbenhall. See Abenhall. Abberley, par. and seat, W. Worcestershire, 4 miles SW. of Stourport sta., 2636 ac., pop. 605; p.o. Abbert, seat, 10 miles NE. of Athenry, co. Galway.

8 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Example from the Imperial Gazetteer: CALBOURNE, a village, a parish, and a sub-district in the Isle of Wight. The village stands 5 miles WSW of Newport; and-has a post- office under Newport. The parish includes also Newtown borough; and extends from Brixton Down to the Solent. Acres, 6,397; of which 265 are water. Real property, £ 4,471. Pop., 728. Houses, 145. The property is divided among a few. Westover manor belonged to the Esturs; passed to the Lisles and the Holmeses; and belongs now to the eldest son of Lord Heytesbury, in right of his wife, the daughter of the late Sir Leonard W. Holmes. The house on it is modern; and the grounds are tasteful. Calbourne Bottom, 1 ¼ mile SSW of the village, is a depression between Brixton and Moltestone downs. The living is a rectory, united with the p. curacy of Newtown, in the diocese of Winchester. Value, £ 675.* Patron, the Bishop of Winchester. The church is early English, much modernized; and has a brass of — The sub-district contains eight parishes. Acres, 25,050. Pop., 5,417. Houses, 1,071.

9 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Structure of gazetteer entries Text divides unambiguously into entries Even with long entries, main focus is first sentence: –Headword –Feature type –Containing county –(Sometimes) containing district and/or parish –Relative location (‘ The village stands 5 miles WSW of Newport ’ ) Imperial Gazetteer: some entries in distinct parts, for the different administrative units taking their name from the place –Distinguishing these is important for links to main (admin units) gazetteer

10 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Parsing Bartholomew’s Entries Identify head word from format: initial string in bold Identify X-refs from string after head word: –‘See’, ‘also called XXX, which see’, ‘another name of XXX, which see’, ‘Welsh name of XXX, which see’ Identify feature type: find the longest available match between the text after headword and list of pre-defined ‘feature type’ strings –Planned link to ADL FTT Identify county by seeking matches with ontology in successive clauses (97% success) Identify parishes by searching for strings, using ontology, qualifying by county –‘and forming part of XXX’ or ‘the hamlet is in XXX’ Future: adding geo-references?

11 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Linking descriptive text to administrative units

12 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Why Travellers’ Tales? A historical web site containing nothing but statistics, graphs and maps is boring. Even if we add historical gazetteers, there will be little to encourage users to move around the system, between localities. They are of great intrinsic interest – i.e. I like them.

13 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Travellers’ Tales “Greatest Hits” William Cobbett, Rural Rides (London, 1830) Daniel Defoe, A Journey through the whole island of Britain divided into circuits or journies (London, ) Through England on a side saddle in the time of William and Mary, being the diary of Celia Fiennes (London, 1888) Arthur Young, Tours in England and Wales, Selected from the Annals of agriculture (London, ) Travelling Agitators: Feargus O’Connor: Principal Chartist leader; journeys in 1838 and 1839 Henry Vincent: ‘Demosthenes of the West’; Chartist in 1839 (30,000 words describing 10 weeks) Edwin Russell: Agricultural labourers’ organiser in 1872

14 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Approaches to mark-up Schemes based on the Text Encoding Initiative Guidelines (www.tei-c.org) the only game in town, but:www.tei-c.org TEI Lite’ defined by the TEI itself –‘a manageable subset of full TEI encoding scheme’ –only place-name tagging is for place of publication American Memory DTD –Developed by Library of Congress to mark up historical texts within American Memory system –AMS DTD excludes geographical and place-name tags –Introduction to DTD: ‘it is too expensive to identify geographic names’ Minnesota “Women’s Travel Writing Project DTD –Adds interpretative information on ethnicity, gender marking, transportation and women’s occupations –Do not tag place-names or geographic features

15 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May The TEI Approach (1) Simple tagging of place-names: I went from New York to Boston Additional attributes to simplify processing: Thence 6 miles to Blandford, thence 18 to Salsebury Identification of locational hierarchy: Took coach for Ledbury, in Herefordshire.

16 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May The TEI Approach (2) Identifying relative locations via ‘offsets’ : –On the right, within four miles of Ledbury stands Eastnor Castle, the residence of Lord Somers’. Identifying types of geographical features : … on account of the heavy rains which had fallen the rivers Lugg and Wye rivers Lugg and Wye have overflowed their bank to such an extent that the roads are impassable.

17 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Example of a route map Can these be generated automatically?

18 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May A sequence of placenames is not a route: From Lemster it is ten miles to Hereford, the chief city, not of this county only, but of all the counties west of Severn: 'Tis a large and a populous city, and in the time of the late Rebellion, was very strong, and being well fortify’d, and as well defended, supported a tedious and very severe siege.... Not far from Lidbury, is Colwal; near which, upon the waste, as a countryman was digging a ditch about his cottage, he found a crown or a coronet of gold, with gems set deep in it. It was of a size large enough to be drawn over the arm, with the sleeve. The stones of it are said to have been so valuable' as to be sold by a jeweller for fifteen hundred pounds. It is truly an old, mean built, and very dirty city, lying low, and on the bank of Wye, which sometimes incommodes them very much, by the violent freshes that come down from the mountains of Wales; for all the rivers of this county, except the Driffin-Doe, come out of Wales.

19 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Geography as metaphor: He could not conclude without expressing his delight at having thus perfected the great chain between London and Edinburgh and Glasgow. All the links were now perfect. London, Newcastle, Carlisle, Glasgow, and Edinburgh had now become forged as it were together, and although the wages of corruption were taken from the provinces to support the idle in the metropolis, yet a spirit was now growing up which nothing but justice could put down. You cannot move partially, because you are as one link in the great chain. (Cheers.) There is an end to sectional agitation; you are each answerable to the other for the manner in which you should handle this cause. (Cheers.) Society is as a great chain. On one end is a rotten link which represents the Whigs, and on the other a rotten link which represents the Tories (cheers and laughter); while you, the people, form the bulk of the chain, which is made stronger by the loss of the rotten links. (Cheers.)

20 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Place-names as metaphor: From the TEI Guidelines: After spending some time in our modern Babylon, New York, I have proceeded to the City of Brotherly Love From early C19 autobiograohies: A month’s stay in modern Babylon was quite sufficient for me, and, gasping like a fish out of water, I set my face towards the open country. On entering the “Modern Babylon” I was almost confounded by its “huge uproar” together with the incessant bustle and hurry in which I found myself suddenly involved. Spent a night on the road then at about a quarter to eleven I entered the modern Babylon. The din and bustle and the never ceasing stream of vehicles of every description rattling backwards and forwards here completely bewildered me.

21 Great Britain Historical GIS Project: A Vision of Britain though Time 31st May Marking-up the roles of places: As the author’s current location. As a reference back to a previous location. As a reference forward to a planned location. As a reference to a place which is not part of the author’s route. As a metaphor for another place Need for extensions to the TEI?


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