Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Floodplain Management Experience Floodplain Management Experience.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Floodplain Management Experience Floodplain Management Experience."— Presentation transcript:

1 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Floodplain Management Experience Floodplain Management Experience

2 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Meet Mitch McDonald Meet Mitch McDonaldBackground:  FEMA Floodplain Management Specialist  Urban Planner  Engineering Technician  Land Surveyor, Military Surveyor  Certified Floodplain Manager Responsibilities Include:  NFIP Compliance  Construction Code Compliance  Local Flood Zone Compliance  Coastal Construction Permitting

3 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Subject for today’s presentation: Subject for today’s presentation: Post-disaster Mitigation in Terrebonne Parish: Post-disaster Mitigation in Terrebonne Parish:  Issues of parish geography  Long-term major flooding history  Lessons learned over time  Evolving floodplain management processes  Accessing externally compiled lists & data sources  Developing a floodplain structure inventory  Future planned process development  Time for questions

4 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Geography of Terrebonne Parish: Geography of Terrebonne Parish:  Maximum height above sea level is 13 feet  Almost at Northern Parish Boundary  Parish Area is 2,100 square miles  New D-FIRM Map places 98% in floodplain  5 long fingers of ridge line reaching inland  Bayou separation with low lying wetlands  Bayous connected by intra coastal waterway  7 sizeable communities south of the ICW  Houma Navigational Canal (Our MRGO)

5

6

7

8

9

10

11 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Background: Background: Terrebonne Parish Major Impact:  1965 Hurricane Betsy  1985 Hurricane Juan  1992 Hurricane Andrew  2002 Hurricane Lili  2005 Hurricane Katrina & Rita  2008 Hurricane Gustav & Ike  2011 ? ? ? ? ? ?

12 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government 1965 – Hurricane Betsy: 1965 – Hurricane Betsy:  First major storm in Parish staff memory  Little prior knowledge or data  No planned response process  No floodplain management structure  No floodplain insurance program  No awareness of potential for mitigation  Complex multi-layered local government

13 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government 1965 – Hurricane Betsy: 1965 – Hurricane Betsy: Lessons (not) Learned Lessons (not) Learned  Viewed as a once in a lifetime event  Modern slab on grade building permitted  No mitigation program considered  No significant data collection/analysis In essence, a return to business as usual In essence, a return to business as usual

14 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government 1965 – Hurricane Betsy: 1965 – Hurricane Betsy: Lessons Learned Lessons Learned 1970 – Insurance: 1970 – Insurance:  Community benefit of NFIP adoption was recognized and acted upon. was recognized and acted upon.  Building restrictions implemented, BUT Planning variances were issued freely Planning variances were issued freely

15 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government 1974 – Hurricane Carmen: 1974 – Hurricane Carmen: Minor impact on Terrebonne Lessons (still not) Learned Lessons (still not) Learned  Still little organized prior data available  Still no planned response process  Still no floodplain management structure  Still complex & conflicting local government  Still no focus on mitigation

16 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government 1974 – Hurricane Carmen: 1974 – Hurricane Carmen: Lessons Learned: Lessons Learned: 1984 – Structure of Government: 1984 – Structure of Government: Transition from the complex multi-layer, small unit system of local government to a new system of consolidated governance, providing economies of scale and facilitating co-ordinated planning over larger areas

17 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government 1985 – Hurricane Juan: 1985 – Hurricane Juan: Situation contained increased risk: Situation contained increased risk:  Erosion & settlement of barrier islands  Land mass settlement expanded floodplain Offshore Storm, bringing heavy rain Offshore Storm, bringing heavy rain Water pushed on-shore and inland Water pushed on-shore and inland  Over 800 residential structures flooded Significantly expanded flood area Significantly expanded flood area

18 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government 1985 – Hurricane Juan: Post event experience: First notable population drift northwards Surge in expressed community concern Increased public awareness of issues Dawning recognition of the value of NFIP Flood Variance Board Disbanded

19 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government 1992 – Hurricane Andrew: Main impact was from N.E. quadrant Main impact was from N.E. quadrant Piled water into New Orleans Piled water into New Orleans Terrebonne mainly saw wind damage Terrebonne mainly saw wind damage Very little local flooding Very little local flooding

20 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Post event experience Recognition of a “Lucky Near Miss” Recognition of a “Lucky Near Miss” However: However: Low level flood impact caused complacency Low level flood impact caused complacency Reinforced once in a lifetime mentality Reinforced once in a lifetime mentality Nationally, the widespread and catastrophic Nationally, the widespread and catastrophic impact of Andrew caused a major hike in impact of Andrew caused a major hike in the level of Federal awareness and concern the level of Federal awareness and concern

21 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Lessons Learned: National recognition of and attention to the importance of mitigation Local communities really start to understand the value of NFIP coverage and the planning requirements on which coverage is dependent 1997 – ICC coverage started

22 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government 2002 – Hurricane Lili: Major flooding event for the Parish (1,000 + Structures) 280 ICC letters issued 280 ICC letters issued  149 Mitigation completion certificates First key learning engagement with FEMA Exploration of elevation programs Broad elevation needs plan evolved

23 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Post Event Experience: Communities started to realize what could be done under the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Individuals saw benefits and assistance gained by neighbors and friends Start of local interest in mitigation options

24 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Lessons Learned: Lessons Learned: First Hazard Mitigation program developed First Hazard Mitigation program developed 2005 – Parish sets cumulative substantial 2005 – Parish sets cumulative substantial improvement (CSI) policy: improvement (CSI) policy:  Flood damage validated from prior NFIP list  Validate structure value from Tax Assessment  Track improvements through Permit Database

25 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government 2005 – Hurricanes Katrina & Rita: Katrina pushed water outwards, but Rita brought major flooding Over 4000 flooded structures NFIP claims paid in Terrebonne 700+ Substantial damage letters issued 700+ Substantial damage letters issued 470+ Completion of Mitigation Certificates 470+ Completion of Mitigation Certificates

26 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Post event experience: High expectations from post Lili experience Significant demand for HMGP assistance System overwhelmed by demand 4,700 claims through NFIP and Road Home Claims paid made without permit application Complications from post-fact permitting

27 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Post event experience: Passive response rather than proactive No seeking out repairs needing permits Left residents to apply for permits Little publicity about need for permits Mailed to RSDE list (50% undeliverable) % damage assessed from RSDE

28 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Lessons Learned: Lessons Learned: 2006 – Parish expands (CSI) policy: 2006 – Parish expands (CSI) policy:  Flood damage validated from prior NFIP list  Validate structure value from Tax Assessment  Track improvements through Permit Database  Validate damage from RSDE lists  Required cost validation by contractor estimate  Document events in the Permit Database

29 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Lessons Learned: Community Assistance Contact sample stimulated further compliance effort stimulated further compliance effort 2007 – Started tracking cumulative damage Inspection / Re-inspection: 2,500 structures on NFIP claims list 1,100 structures on Road Home list 760 structures on Repetitive Loss list 760 structures on Repetitive Loss list (Now 1,900+) (Now 1,900+)

30 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Lessons Learned: Start to actively engage community Verified permit status of each listed structure Wrote to owners of non-compliant structures Mailed 780 letters from PSDL list Responses help assess potential ICC claims Gustav and Ike overtook these processes

31 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government 2008 – Hurricanes Gustav & Ike: Gustav – wind event with only moderate coastal flooding (235 Structures) coastal flooding (235 Structures) Ike - brought major flooding (3,000+ Structures) 300+ Substantial damage letters issued 300+ Substantial damage letters issued 200+ Mitigation Completion Certificates 200+ Mitigation Completion Certificates Over 450 structures mitigated before Ike (None flooded during Ike) (None flooded during Ike)

32 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Post event experience: Post event experience: Started SFHA flooded structure inventory Started SFHA flooded structure inventory 2200 Letters to NFIP Policy Holders 2200 Letters to NFIP Policy Holders (Identified through permit tracking ) (Identified through permit tracking ) 264 – Increased Cost of Compliance list 264 – Increased Cost of Compliance list  333 – HMGP + ICC list  728 – Possible Substantial Damage List  111 – Cumulative Damage list

33 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Post event experience: Community now highly sensitized to FEMA Community now highly sensitized to FEMA program benefits. program benefits. Claims made under multiple programs and Claims made under multiple programs and from multiple sources NFIP:SBA:ICC:Banks etc. from multiple sources NFIP:SBA:ICC:Banks etc. Some applicants self mitigating Some applicants self mitigating Options to pool money from other sources Options to pool money from other sources Waiting for HMPG is not an option Waiting for HMPG is not an option

34 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Lessons Learned: Community benefit of proactive approach Community benefit of proactive approach Use outside data sources for outreach Use outside data sources for outreach Need for a floodplain structure inventory Need for a floodplain structure inventory ISSUE: ISSUE: Not achievable within normal resource limits Not achievable within normal resource limits

35 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government 2009 – The Delicate Balance: Thursday 27 March 2009 The current precarious balance in our Parish floodplain was heavily underlined during a single night of heavy rain which left almost 400 residential structures flooded – some of them to depths of up to 3.5 feet. This almost equaled one half of the flooding sustained during Hurricane Juan in 1985 !

36 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Accumulated Impact Experience: 9 Hurricanes in 44 years Recently, 5 Hurricanes in 7 seasons  1965 Hurricane Betsy  1974 Hurricane Carmen  1985 Hurricane Juan  1992 Hurricane Andrew  2002 Hurricane Lili  2005 Hurricane Katrina & Rita  2008 Hurricane Gustav & Ike  2011 ? ? ? ? ? ?

37 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Post Ike Floodplain Structure Inventory: 10,491 Residential Structures in Floodplain 605 Flooded and Destroyed 605 Flooded and Destroyed 208 Flooded and Abandoned 208 Flooded and Abandoned 2,022 Flooded and Repairable 2,245 Post FIRM structures – No Water 2,245 Post FIRM structures – No Water 3,929 Partly elevated structures – No Water 3,929 Partly elevated structures – No Water (500+ on 3ft/4ft piers after Rita) (500+ on 3ft/4ft piers after Rita) 1,482 Slab on grade – No Water 1,482 Slab on grade – No Water

38 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Post Ike Floodplain Mitigation: From SFHA Structure Inventory Project: 605 Flooded and Destroyed 208 Flooded and Abandoned 813 Declared Substantially damaged Only 35 carried flood insurance ! Only 35 carried flood insurance ! 400+ Demolition Permits (350+ Completed) 400+ Demolition Permits (350+ Completed) 260+ PA Demolitions ( 71 Completed) 260+ PA Demolitions ( 71 Completed) 153 Pending Completion 153 Pending Completion

39 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Post Ike Floodplain Mitigation: From Ike SDLs Issued 312 ICC Mitigation Permits 312 ICC Mitigation Permits 182 Completed Elevation 182 Completed Elevation 14 Completed Demolition 14 Completed Demolition 116 Still to be completed 116 Still to be completed

40 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Floodplain Database : Floodplain Database : For all 10,491 structures in the highest risk areas: For all 10,491 structures in the highest risk areas:  Physical Address and GPS location  Elevation (on grade, block, full or old elevation)  In-structure water level from Hurricane Ike  Inventory of destroyed & uninhabited structures  Inventory of anticipated permit applications  FEMA quick claim list cross reference

41 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Floodplain Database: Collecting the data took commitment:  Our staff provided local knowledge  Our Parish provided local resources  Building inspections generated some data  Parish management supported the initiative  Institute for Building Technology & Safety (IBTS) mangaged the project as a (IBTS) mangaged the project as a sidebar to inspection activity. sidebar to inspection activity.

42 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Floodplain Database: The SFHA Structure Inventory has also generated the data required to: Develop cost benefit analysis to justify 3 levee improvement projects under CDBG;Develop cost benefit analysis to justify 3 levee improvement projects under CDBG; Meet data analysis needs for community planning activities;Meet data analysis needs for community planning activities; Provide HMGP qualification evidenceProvide HMGP qualification evidence Support FEMA individual assistance claim assessments;Support FEMA individual assistance claim assessments;

43 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Floodplain Database: The data represents a valuable tool which serves immediate planning needs. The Parish understands that it is a work in progress which will take effort to maintain, expand and improve. The Parish has made application for FEMA funding to maintain/expand the inventory and improve its database.

44 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Floodplain Database: Floodplain Database: Next Steps: Next Steps:  Cross reference with prior damage lists  Cross reference with other agency claims  Target structure elevation needs advice  Target building permit requirement notices  Target building code enforcement activity  Demonstrate structure demolition needs  Update through link to building inspections  Expand the at-risk area covered

45 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Overall Lessons Learned: Overall Lessons Learned:  Communities still need their options explained  Aggressive proactive approach pays dividends  Community awareness aids administration  Documentation advances learning processes  The value of a floodplain structure inventory  Integrate data from many external sources  Experienced external support is available  Ideas and developments need to be shared  The process is evolutionary & ongoing

46 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Why is it..... that common sense always seems to be the least common of all the senses ?

47 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government A good deed gone bad VARIANCE n. (vair-ee-unce) Technical term: used in floodplain management to describe a situation where some well- meaning person with authority has allowed a structure to be built without it having to comply with normally required, sensible and proven safeguards; usually resulting in higher levels of danger and long term cost for the owner, occupier, general public and taxpayer.

48 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government A good deed A good deed 1980 slab on grade by variance 1980 slab on grade by variance

49 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government A good deed ? A good deed ? 1985 Benefit of variance ? 1985 Benefit of variance ?

50 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government A good deed ? A good deed ? 2002 Benefit of variance ? 2002 Benefit of variance ?

51 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government A good deed ? A good deed ? 2005 Benefit of variance ? 2005 Benefit of variance ?

52 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government A good deed ? A good deed ? 2008 Benefit of variance ? 2008 Benefit of variance ?

53 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government A good deed ? A good deed ? Now the costs really start ! Now the costs really start !

54 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government A good deed ? A good deed ? And then the costs rise ! And then the costs rise !

55 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government A good deed ? A good deed ? And they rise ! And they rise !

56 A good deed ? A good deed ? And they continue to rise ! And they continue to rise ! Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government

57 VARIANCE n. (vair-ee-unce) VARIANCE n. (vair-ee-unce) A real good way to mess up the life of A real good way to mess up the life of someone you don’t like ! someone you don’t like !

58 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Thank You for this opportunity to share our experience

59 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government ANY QUESTIONS ?

60 Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Floodplain Management Experience Floodplain Management Experience


Download ppt "Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government Floodplain Management Experience Floodplain Management Experience."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google