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Water Issues for Golf Courses PERMITTING Andrew Burg, PE, RLS February 24, 2004 Myers Park Country Club Charlotte, North Carolina.

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Presentation on theme: "Water Issues for Golf Courses PERMITTING Andrew Burg, PE, RLS February 24, 2004 Myers Park Country Club Charlotte, North Carolina."— Presentation transcript:

1 Water Issues for Golf Courses PERMITTING Andrew Burg, PE, RLS February 24, 2004 Myers Park Country Club Charlotte, North Carolina

2 www.EGAPS.net Little Sugar Watershed “The Little Sugar Creek watershed is one of the most severely polluted watersheds in North Carolina (NCDWQ Catawba River Basinwide Water Quality Plan pp. 4-24 to 4-27).” "The County Commission herein finds that the public policy of Mecklenburg County is that our surface waters --- creeks, tributaries, ponds and lakes --- are a natural resource to be protected as a source of natural beauty and recreation. Further, that the use of our creeks, tributaries, ponds and lakes as a stormwater disposal method shall be secondary to the preservation of creeks, tributaries, ponds and lakes.”

3 www.EGAPS.net Santee-Cooper River System The Santee-Cooper River Basin comprises the second largest Atlantic coast watershed in the United States. Catawba

4 www.EGAPS.net Charlotte-Mecklenburg Sugar Creek Little Sugar Creek

5 www.EGAPS.net North-South Carolina Sugar Creek Little Sugar Creek Sugar Creek North Carolina South Carolina “NCDENR & SCDHEC have together conducted special studies of this sub- basin indicating the need for basin-wide storm water BMPs for the ‘most polluted’ basin in North Carolina.” Crystal Springs Golf Course

6 www.EGAPS.net South Carolina Sugar Creek in South Carolina Catawba River “By some NCDENR and SCDHEC estimates, as much as 40 percent of the phosphorus load in Lake Wateree originates from the Sugar Creek sub-basin.”

7 www.EGAPS.net Aerial Reconnaissance

8 www.EGAPS.net Rainfall & Stream Gages

9 www.EGAPS.net Stream Gages WaterQualityIndex

10 www.EGAPS.net Pollutants  Nutrients PhosphorusPhosphorus NitrogenNitrogen  Sediment Heavy metalsHeavy metals SmotheringSmothering Bank ErosionBank Erosion ConstructionConstruction  Chemical & Physical pHpH Dissolved OxygenDissolved Oxygen ConductivityConductivity  Thermal Pavement runoffPavement runoff Lack of tree shadeLack of tree shade  Fecal Coliform Sanitary sewer overflowsSanitary sewer overflows Animal, bird and pet fecesAnimal, bird and pet feces

11 www.EGAPS.net Federal  United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Section 404 of the Clean Water Act of 1972 (CWA)Section 404 of the Clean Water Act of 1972 (CWA) Code of Federal Regulations 33 CFR 330Code of Federal Regulations 33 CFR 330 Nationwide (NWP) Nos. 1 – 44 Nationwide (NWP) Nos. 1 – 44 Individual Permit Individual Permit SWANCC decision from US Supreme Court (Jan. 2001)SWANCC decision from US Supreme Court (Jan. 2001)  Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Letter of Map Revision (LOMR)Letter of Map Revision (LOMR) Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) Conditional Letter of Map Revision (CLOMR)Conditional Letter of Map Revision (CLOMR) Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM)

12 www.EGAPS.net Federal  United States Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) Commenting to USACE under Section 404 processCommenting to USACE under Section 404 process  United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Commenting to USACE under Section 404 processCommenting to USACE under Section 404 process National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Phases 1 & 2 (metro area size) Phases 1 & 2 (metro area size) Point Sources (WWTP, industrial plants … Metromont, Celanese) Point Sources (WWTP, industrial plants … Metromont, Celanese) Non-Point Sources (golf courses, lawns, homes, city storm drains) Non-Point Sources (golf courses, lawns, homes, city storm drains) Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act of 1972Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act of 1972 Impaired Waters / Non-Supporting Uses Impaired Waters / Non-Supporting Uses Drinking Water Supply, Prolonged Contact, Trout Waters, etc.) Drinking Water Supply, Prolonged Contact, Trout Waters, etc.)

13 www.EGAPS.net State  NC Department of Environment & Natural Resources Division of Water Quality (NCDWQ)Division of Water Quality (NCDWQ) Section 401 Water Quality Certification Section 401 Water Quality Certification Individual Permit Individual Permit Isolated Wetlands (state enforcement vs. federal; since SWANCC) Isolated Wetlands (state enforcement vs. federal; since SWANCC)  NC Department of Environment & Natural Resources Division of Land Resources (NCDLR)Division of Land Resources (NCDLR) Erosion & Sedimentation Control Erosion & Sedimentation Control  NC Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) Commenting to NCDENR under Section 401 processCommenting to NCDENR under Section 401 process

14 www.EGAPS.net SWANCC Ducks Unlimited www.ducks.com On January 9, 2001 the U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision, Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County (SWANCC) v. United States Army Corps of Engineers. The decision reduces the protection of isolated wetlands under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (CWA), which assigns the US Army Corps of Engineers authority to issue permits for the discharge of dredge or fill material into "waters of the United States." Prior to the SWANCC decision, the Corps had adopted a regulatory definition of "waters of the U.S." that afforded federal protection for almost all of the nation's wetlands.

15 www.EGAPS.net SWANCC Ducks Unlimited www.ducks.com The Supreme Court also concluded that the use of migratory birds to assert jurisdiction over the site exceeded the authority that Congress had granted the Corps under the CWA. The Court interpreted that Corps jurisdiction is restricted to navigable waters, their tributaries, and wetlands that are adjacent to these navigable waterways and tributaries. The decision leaves "isolated" wetlands unprotected by the CWA. These wetlands are very significant to many wildlife populations, especially migratory waterfowl. This report examines the possible implications to wetlands that are important to waterfowl across the Nation.

16 www.EGAPS.net Local  City of Charlotte Riparian Stream BuffersRiparian Stream Buffers Erosion & Sedimentation ControlErosion & Sedimentation Control Local “No Rise”Local “No Rise”  Mecklenburg County Riparian Stream BuffersRiparian Stream Buffers Floodlands “Development” PermitFloodlands “Development” Permit No Adverse Impact (rise, floodway shift, floodway width, etc.)No Adverse Impact (rise, floodway shift, floodway width, etc.) VarianceVariance Administrative Administrative Zoning Board of Adjustment Zoning Board of Adjustment

17 www.EGAPS.net Resources (Internet)  Federal www.epa.govwww.epa.govwww.epa.gov www.fema.govwww.fema.govwww.fema.gov www.usace.army.milwww.usace.army.milwww.usace.army.mil  North Carolina http://h2o.enr.state.nc.us/index.htmlhttp://h2o.enr.state.nc.us/index.htmlhttp://h2o.enr.state.nc.us/index.html http://www.dlr.enr.state.nc.us/http://www.dlr.enr.state.nc.us/http://www.dlr.enr.state.nc.us/  Local www.charmeck.orgwww.charmeck.orgwww.charmeck.org

18 www.EGAPS.net Applause Andrew Burg, PE, RLS 704.589.9857 http://www.egaps.net Easement, Grant Application & Permitting Services


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