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Do You Have 30 Seconds to Save a Life? Tobacco Cessation PHI.

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Presentation on theme: "Do You Have 30 Seconds to Save a Life? Tobacco Cessation PHI."— Presentation transcript:

1 Do You Have 30 Seconds to Save a Life? Tobacco Cessation PHI

2 ► This is a self-study module developed by members of the Research and Quality Councils to provide staff the best evidence on tobacco cessation. ► At the end of this module, the participant will be able to:  Describe the importance of tobacco cessation interventions  Discuss the 5 A intervention process for quitting  Describe the role of the PinnacleHealth tobacco cessation counselor  Identify three resources available within PinnacleHealth System or the community to assist patients with tobacco cessation.

3 The Crime

4 Crime Scene Evidence ► Annually 430,000 people die from tobacco-related diseases ► Healthy People 2010’s goal is for 85% of healthcare providers to routinely advise about cessation ► Nurses can focus efforts in 2 directions: the 26% of the population that use tobacco & also in primary prevention

5 How can this crime be prevented? ► Motivate high-risk groups ► Minimal efforts improve long-term quit rates by 5-10% ► Consistent, persistent approach ► Multiple, personalized interventions

6 How can nurses prevent the crime? ► Nurse-led tobacco cessation interventions increase success by 50% ► “If the 2.2 million nurses in the US each helped 1 person/yr quit, nurses would triple the US quit rate (Tobacco free nurses, 2002)

7 A crime-free society takes time ► Cessation requires many attempts ► The process is different for each person ► Quitting occurs in stages and nurses need to intervene at each stage

8 Tampered Evidence (myths) ► Smokers don’t want to quit. Fact: Seventy to eighty percent of smokers do want to quit but are unable to do so without assistance. ► ► Nurses don’t have enough time to provide smoking cessation advice. Fact: A brief smoking intervention (< 3 minutes) can increase quit rates. ► ► Nurses who smoke can’t be helpful to patients using tobacco. Fact: No one understands the difficulty of quitting more than a person who has recently attempted quitting.

9 Short-Term Risks of Tobacco Use ► Smokers  shortness of breath  exacerbation of asthma  harm to pregnancy  impotence, infertility ► Smokeless tobacco users  mouth and gum disease

10 Long-term Risks of Tobacco Use ► Smokers  Heart attack  COPD  Stroke  Cervical cancer  Pancreatic cancer  Bladder Cancer  Lung cancer  Oral, pharyngeal, esophageal cancer ► Smokeless Tobacco Users  Oral, pharyngeal, esophageal cancer

11 Environmental Risks of Tobacco Use ► Lung cancer and heart disease from second hand smoke ► Low birth weight ► SIDS ► Asthma ► Middle ear infections ► Respiratory infections

12 Rewards/Benefits of Quitting ► After 20 minutes...  Blood pressure and heart rate drop to normal  Body temperature of extremities increases to normal ► After 8-12 hours...  Blood oxygen level increases to normal  Carbon monoxode levels drop to normal ► After hours...  Chance of heart attack is decreased  Nerve endings start regrowing  Smell and taste is enhanced

13 Rewards/Benefits of Quitting ► After 2-3 weeks...  Circulation improves  Walking becomes easier  Lung function increases up to 30% ► After 1-12 months...  Coughing, sinus congestion, fatigue, SOB decrease  Cilia regrow in lungs, reducing risk of infection  Body’s overall energy increases  Risk of coronary heart disease is decreased by half

14 Rewards/Benefits of Quitting ► After 5 years...  Lung cancer death rate decreases by half  Stroke risk similar to non-smoker  Risk of mouth, throat and esophageal cancers is decreased by half ► After years...  Lung cancer death rate similar to non-smoker  Pre-cancerous cells are replaced  Risk of cancer to other organs decreases  Risk of coronary disease is equivalent to a non-smoker

15 Barriers to Quitting ► Previous unsuccessful quit attempts ► Enjoys smoking and has smoked for a long time ► Living with other smokers or smoking friends ► Stress reliever ► Fear of weight gain ► Fear of failure ► Withdrawal symptoms

16 5 A’s – Intervention for Quitting ► Ask ► Advise ► Assess ► Assist ► Arrange

17 ► Ask patients about their tobacco status. “Are you currently using tobacco products?” “How much tobacco are you using?”

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19 ► Advise your patient to quit using tobacco products. “It is important for you to quit smoking now and we can help you” ► Personalizing the message can increase its impact. ► Reinforce that it can take up to seven attempts to successfully stay quit.

20 ► Assess readiness to quit. “Are you interested in quitting with our help?” “Are you ready to quit in the next few weeks?”

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22 ► Assist patient to quit.  Contact Tobacco Cessation Counselor if patient is ready to quit at  Provide “Preparing to Quit Using Tobacco” on patient education intranet site: PreparingToQuit.pdf PreparingToQuit.pdf

23 Tobacco Cessation Counselor Role ► Assists patients in developing an individualized plan to quit. ► Consult generated when smoking checked on Admission Assessment BUT: counselor is part time and not able to see all pts. ► Counselor will follow up with phone consults first. Call if pt ready to quit and in need of a “plan”.

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25 ► Arrange follow-up to monitor progress. ► QUIT line is available 24 hours, seven days/week for ongoing support. ► QUIT line

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27 Methods to Help Quitting ► Pharmacotherapy ► Self-help materials ► Individual counseling and group therapy ► Alternative therapies Use of multiple methods can increase the chance of successfully quitting.

28 Pharmacotherapy ► Nicotine Replacement Therapy can be used for short-term therapy reduce withdrawal symptoms in patients. ► This should only be used with patients that still have nicotine in their systems. ► It takes an average of 3 days for nicotine to clear from the smoker’s body.

29 Nicotine Replacement Therapy ► Available in various forms – gum, transdermal patches, intranasal spray and lozenge ► Advise patient to consult with physician before use of these products ► Advise patients to read product instructions prior to use

30 Pharmacotherapy ► Bupropion SR (Zyban or Wellbutrin) has been found to decrease the urge for smoking.

31 Individual Counseling and Group Therapy ► Both forms of counseling have been shown to be effective ► PinnacleHealth offers Tobacco Cessation Classes for a fee. Information is found on the Learning Institute intranet site. Click on “Community Education” ► Areas of potential information include Health Screening, Support Groups, Wellness Services, Women’s Programs. ►

32 Alternative Therapies ► Hypnosis, acupuncture, acupressure and electroacupressure have been utilized but not shown to have conclusive benefit ► These can be adjunctive therapy with the other therapies

33 Self-Help Materials ► Written materials ► Audio/video tapes ► Computer programs/chat rooms ► Internet-based cessation programs ► Telephone hotlines These materials are more effective than no intervention and should be tailored to the individual tobacco user.

34 Pinnacle Resources ► Intranet: Click on “Departments” then “Learning Institute” ► For patient education handouts, click on “Patient Education” ► Click on “T” for Tobacco Cessation Module. Includes list of Tobacco Cessation resources and FREE QUITLINE: oQuit.pdf oQuit.pdf

35 Pinnacle Resources ► Intranet home page, click on “Departments”, click on “Women Care Resource Centers” ► Site has many helpful resources for women ► May be helpful to pts/families or staff looking for support ► inwcare.htm inwcare.htm inwcare.htm

36 Internet Resources ► cofreekids.org/research/ ► cofreekids.org/research/ ://www.tobaccofreekids.org/http://www.tobac cofreekids.org/research/://www.tobaccofreekids.org/http://www.tobac cofreekids.org/research/ Tobacco Free Nurses - second one is their fact sheet on nurses Tobacco Free Nurses - second one is their fact sheet on nurses ► s.org/media/documents/factsscreen.pdf ► s.org/media/documents/factsscreen.pdf s.org/media/documents/factsscreen.pdf s.org/media/documents/factsscreen.pdf This site is the guide for nurses using the 5As, gives some resources for pts, and lists pharmacotherapies and their durations This site is the guide for nurses using the 5As, gives some resources for pts, and lists pharmacotherapies and their durations

37 Internet Resources, cont. ► ► Has a 5-Day Countdown to Your Quit Date sheet telling patients what to do Has a 5-Day Countdown to Your Quit Date sheet telling patients what to do ► ok.htm ► ok.htm ok.htm ok.htm "Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence" - quick reference guide from Surgeon General "Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence" - quick reference guide from Surgeon General

38 Internet Resources, cont. ► htm ► htm htm htm Interactive TIPS sheet from the CDC showing how various organs look after you've smoked Interactive TIPS sheet from the CDC showing how various organs look after you've smoked ► ation/flash/index.html ation/flash/index.html ation/flash/index.html PA 24 hr Quitline: PA 24 hr Quitline:

39 One Final Word..... Don’t Forget to Document!! Select Education Documentation

40 Select Tobacco Cessation

41 ► Anderson, J.E., Jorenby, D.E., Scott, W. J. & Fiore, M.C. (2002). Treating tobacco use and dependence: An evidence-based clinical practice guideline for tobacco cessation. Chest, 3, p ► Joanna Briggs Institute – Smoking Cessation Interventions and Strategies Information Sheet, ► National Clearing House for Practice Guidelines ting+Tobacco&num=20 ting+Tobacco&num=20 ting+Tobacco&num=20 ► Nursing Best Practice Guideline: Integrating Smoking Cessation into Daily Nursing Practice References

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43 Thank you ► Kim Fowler, MSN, RN ► Sarah Harne-Britner, MSN, RN, CCRN ► Patricia Baxter, BSN, RNBC ► Trish Bennett, MSN, RN, CCRN ► Barbara Nace, RN ► Linda Blough, RN ► Betsy Ross, MS ► Arletta Molnar, RNC ► Brad Peterson


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