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Big Question: How can migration affect a culture? Author: James R. Grossman Genre: Expository Nonfiction.

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Presentation on theme: "Big Question: How can migration affect a culture? Author: James R. Grossman Genre: Expository Nonfiction."— Presentation transcript:

1 Big Question: How can migration affect a culture? Author: James R. Grossman Genre: Expository Nonfiction

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3 Review Games  Story Sort Story Sort Story Sort VocabularyWords Vocabulary Words:  Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games  Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack  Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary  Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words

4 Spelling Words Latin Roots

5 vision suspect visible donate spectator visor current excursion revise pardon prospective provision supervisor inspector spectacle concur recur visitor donor donation spectacular introspection visionary visibility occurrence

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7 Vocabulary Words  burden  conformed  leisure  maintenance  rural  sufficient  urban  diligently  enthusiastically  packinghouse  belongings  curious  journey Vocabulary Words More Words to Know

8 Monday Question of the Day How can migration affect a culture?

9 Today we will learn about:  Build Concepts  Generalize  Ask Questions  Build Background  Vocabulary  Fluency: Tone of Voice  Grammar: Punctuation  Spelling: Latin Roots  Migration

10 Fluency Tone of Voice

11 Fluency: Tone of Voice  Listen as I read “Beyond Mississippi.”  As I read, notice how I use my tone of voice to make my reading more dramatic and interesting.  Be ready to answer questions after I finish.

12 Fluency: Tone of Voice  Can you identify a generalization in the first paragraph?  What kind of person would be most likely to survive the journey to the West?

13 Concept Vocabulary  belongings – things that someone owns; possessions  curious – eager to know  journey – a long trip from one place to another

14 Concept Vocabulary (To add information to the graphic organizer, click on end show, type in your new information, and save your changes.)

15 Why You Go What You Take Where You Go Migration

16 Generalize, Ask Questions Turn to Page 750 - 751.

17 Prior Knowledge What do you know about African Americans in the early history of the United States? K (What do you know?) W (What would you like to learn?) L (What did you learn?)

18 Build Background  This week’s audio explores the work of Jacob Lawrence, a painter who depicted the Great Migration. After you listen, we will discuss what you learned.

19 Vocabulary Words

20  burden – something carried; load of things, care, work, or dutyburden  conformed – were the same as; agreed  leisure – free; not busy  maintenance – act of keeping in good repair

21 Vocabulary Words  rural – in the countryrural  sufficient – enough  urban – typical of citiesurban

22 More Words to Know  diligently – carefully; steadily  enthusiastically – with great and eager interest  packinghouse – place where foods are prepared and packed to be soldpackinghouse  (Next Slide) (Next Slide)

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27 GrammarPunctuation

28  southerner’s whom moved north had visions of better lifes  Southerners who moved north had visions of better lives.  more than fifty four familys were on the 900 p.m. train.  More than fifty-four families were on the 9:00 p.m. train.

29 Punctuation  The Thomases were part of the first Great Migration—the collective journeys of a half- million black southerners.  The dash sets off information that summarizes, or a comment that interrupts the flow of, a sentence.

30 Punctuation  A semicolon ( ; ) can be used to separate the two parts of a compound sentence when they are not joined by a comma and a conjunction.  The Thomas family moved to Chicago; they looked for a place to live.

31 Punctuation  Semicolons separate items in a series if commas are already used in the series.  The band includes John Drummond, clarinetist; Tim Salmonson, piano player; and Jim Smelser, drummer.

32 Punctuation  A colon ( : ) is used after the salutation in a business letter and to separate the hours and minutes in expressions of time.  Dear Sir:  12:01 P.M.

33 Punctuation  Colons introduce a list and set off a speaker’s name in a play.  This train stops in the following cities: Jackson, Little Rock, and Chicago.  John: I can’t wait to start my new job.

34 Punctuation  A dash ( -- ) sets off information that interrupts the flow of a sentence.  Jon Bixly—he’s written a book—is an authority on the early 1900s.

35 Punctuation  A hyphen ( - ) is used in certain compound words, such as compound adjectives before nouns, spelled-out numbers, and some two-word nouns.  a well-cooked goose  forty-three travelers  self-control

36 Punctuation  Parentheses ( ) set off additional information that is not essential.  African Americans moving to the North experienced great change. (For more information, visit your local library.)

37 Punctuation  Parentheses enclose numbers or letters within a sentence.  The most important ingredients are (1) flour, (2) sugar, and (3) butter.

38 Punctuation Punctuation Add semicolons, colons, dashes, hyphens, or parentheses where they belong.  Our train went through these states Mississippi, Tennessee, and Kentucky.  Our train went through these states: Mississippi, Tennessee, and Kentucky.

39 Punctuation Punctuation Add semicolons, colons, dashes, hyphens, or parentheses where they belong.  Mr. Thomas he’s the one in the red scarf caught the 504 P.M. train.  Mr. Thomas—he’s the one in the red scarf—caught the 5:04 P.M. train.

40 Punctuation Punctuation Add semicolons, colons, dashes, hyphens, or parentheses where they belong.  Our family found seats on the train other people had to stand.  Our family found seats on the train; other people had to stand.

41 Punctuation Punctuation Add semicolons, colons, dashes, hyphens, or parentheses where they belong.  Ex Southerners often headed to the North to find better paying jobs. See the chart on page 36.  Ex-Southerners often headed to the North to find better paying jobs. (See the chart on page 36.)

42 Punctuation Punctuation Add semicolons, colons, dashes, hyphens, or parentheses where they belong.  This train will stop in Nashville, Tennessee Louisville, Kentucky and Indianapolis, Indiana.  This train will stop in Nashville, Tennessee; Louisville, Kentucky; and Indianapolis, Indiana.

43 Punctuation Punctuation Add semicolons, colons, dashes, hyphens, or parentheses where they belong.  Some went north by train others went on foot.  Some went north by train; others went on foot.

44 Spelling Words Latin Roots

45 vision suspect visible donate spectator visor current excursion revise pardon prospective provision supervisor inspector spectacle concur recur visitor donor donation spectacular introspection visionary visibility occurrence

46 Tuesday Question of the Day How did the Great Migration affect Southern communities?

47 Today we will learn about:  Context Clues  Generalize  Vocabulary  Fluency: Choral Reading  Grammar: Punctuation  Spelling: Latin Roots  Social Studies: Bronzeville, Chicago

48 Vocabulary Strategy: Synonyms Turn to Page 752 - 753.

49 Where Opportunity Awaits Turn to Page 754 - 757.

50 Fluency Choral Reading

51 Fluency: Choral Reading  Turn to page 761, first paragraph.  As I read, notice how I change the pitch of my voice for direct quotations.  We will practice as a class doing three choral readings.

52 GrammarPunctuation

53  please pick up these items carrots butter and saltfree broth  Please pick up these items: carrots, butter, and salt-free broth.  currant working conditions are more better than they were in 1917  Current working conditions are better than they were in 1917.

54 Punctuation  Punctuation makes sentence meaning clear to readers.  In general, punctuation is used to group words and ideas that belong together and to separate those that do not.  In addition to periods, commas, and quotation marks, punctuation marks include semicolons, colons, dashes, hyphens, and parentheses.

55 Spelling Words Latin Roots

56 vision suspect visible donate spectator visor current excursion revise pardon prospective provision supervisor inspector spectacle concur recur visitor donor donation spectacular introspection visionary visibility occurrence

57 Wednesday Question of the Day How do you think the Great Migration affected the economies of Northern and Midwestern cities?

58 Today we will learn about:  Ask Questions  Compare and Contrast  Vocabulary  Fluency: Tone of Voice  Grammar: Punctuation  Spelling: Latin Roots  Social Studies: Time-and-Motion Studies  Migration

59 Where Opportunity Awaits Turn to Page 758 - 762.

60 Fluency Tone of Voice

61 Fluency: Tone of Voice  Turn to page 766, paragraphs 2-3.  As I read, notice how I vary the pitch of my voice to reflect the meaning of the immigrant’s words.  Now we will practice together as a class by doing three choral readings.

62 GrammarPunctuation

63  “let me know what day to expect you” a woman wrote from chicago  “Let me know what day to expect you,” a woman wrote from Chicago.  trains were the most fastest way for visiters to travel  Trains were the fastest way for visitors to travel.

64 Punctuation  Punctuation makes sentence meaning clear to readers.  In general, punctuation is used to group words and ideas that belong together and to separate those that do not.  In addition to periods, commas, and quotation marks, punctuation marks include semicolons, colons, dashes, hyphens, and parentheses.

65 Punctuation  Writers use punctuation to signal information to readers.  A dash says, “I’m putting in this extra information, and then I’ll get back to my original idea.”  A semicolon can say, “Notice that these two sentences are closely connected in meaning.”

66 Punctuation  Both commas and semicolons can say, “Here is a transition between ideas.”  Review something you have written to see if you can improve it by adding punctuation.

67 Spelling Words Latin Roots

68 vision suspect visible donate spectator visor current excursion revise pardon prospective provision supervisor inspector spectacle concur recur visitor donor donation spectacular introspection visionary visibility occurrence

69 Thursday Question of the Day How might immigration policy be a boon economically to a city, region, or country? How might it not?

70 Today we will learn about:  Expository Nonfiction  Reading Across Texts  Content-Area Vocabulary  Fluency: Partner Reading  Grammar: Punctuation  Spelling: Latin Roots  Social Studies: First Class vs. Steerage  Social Studies: Final Destinations

71 “Coming Over” Turn to Page 764 - 769.

72 Fluency Partner Reading

73 Fluency: Partner Reading  Turn to page 766, paragraphs 2-3.  Read this three times with a partner. Be sure to read with appropriate intonation and offer each other feedback.

74 GrammarPunctuation

75  inspecters werent never disturbed by the ocnditions in rental property  Inspectors weren’t disturbed by the conditions in rental property.  there were a need for housing jobs and food  There was a need for housing, jobs, and food.

76 Punctuation  Punctuation makes sentence meaning clear to readers.  In general, punctuation is used to group words and ideas that belong together and to separate those that do not.  In addition to periods, commas, and quotation marks, punctuation marks include semicolons, colons, dashes, hyphens, and parentheses.

77 Punctuation  Test Tip: Remember to use a hyphen when adding a prefix to a proper noun.  No: The preDepression way of life was over.  Yes: The pre-Depression way of life was over.

78 Spelling Words Latin Roots

79 vision suspect visible donate spectator visor current excursion revise pardon prospective provision supervisor inspector spectacle concur recur visitor donor donation spectacular introspection visionary visibility occurrence

80 Friday Question of the Day How can migration affect a culture?

81 Today we will learn about:  Build Concept Vocabulary  Generalization  Idiom  Context Clues  Grammar: Punctuation  Spelling: Latin Roots  Map/Globe/Atlas  Migration

82 Generalize  A generalization is a broad statement or rule that applies to many examples. Authors sometimes make generalizations about a group of things or people to get a message across.  A generalization is often signaled by clue words such as most, all, always, or never.

83 Generalize  A generalization can be either valid or faulty.  Valid generalizations are supported by examples, facts, or sound logic.  Invalid generalizations are not supported.

84 Idiom  An idiom is a phrase or expression whose meaning cannot be understood from the ordinary meaning of the words that form it.  For example: “Clean your plate” is an English idiom for “eat all the food on your plate.”  The context often provides clues to the meaning of an idiom.

85 Synonyms  Synonyms are one type of context clue that can help you figure out the meaning of unfamiliar words.  What is an appropriate synonym to replace each italicized word in these sentences?

86 Synonyms  “But by 1930, that likelihood had diminished considerably, with African Americans segregated into ghettoes.”  “In fact, the first Great Migration was stimulated by the opening of thousands of new railroad jobs.”

87 Synonyms  “In those areas where southern workers did not have to sustain a regular pace—railroad-tie layers, dock hands, construction gangs, for example—a work song set the rhythm.”  “Men with farm experience were accustomed to a workday that began at dawn and ended at sundown.”

88 Map/Globe/Atlas  Which provides a more accurate model of Earth—a map or a globe?  What is an atlas?  A legend, or key, explains symbols.  A compass rose shows directions. Mapmakers usually orient maps to show north at the top.

89 Map/Globe/Atlas  A scale shows how many miles or kilometers a unit of length equals. For example, one inch might equal 500 miles or kilometers on the map.

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91 GrammarPunctuation

92  An young man no one knew his name stood up to speak  A young man—no one knew his name—stood up to speak.  the newcomers worked hardly to keep their job’s  The newcomers worked hard to keep their jobs.

93 Punctuation  Punctuation makes sentence meaning clear to readers.  In general, punctuation is used to group words and ideas that belong together and to separate those that do not.  In addition to periods, commas, and quotation marks, punctuation marks include semicolons, colons, dashes, hyphens, and parentheses.

94 Spelling Words Latin Roots

95 vision suspect visible donate spectator visor current excursion revise pardon prospective provision supervisor inspector spectacle concur recur visitor donor donation spectacular introspection visionary visibility occurrence

96 Story test Classroom webpage, Reading Test AR Other Reading Quizzes Quiz #


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