Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Prostitution: work or oppression? Amélie Mathieu Communications and Development officer Regional intervention women group assembly Canada (Québec)

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Prostitution: work or oppression? Amélie Mathieu Communications and Development officer Regional intervention women group assembly Canada (Québec)"— Presentation transcript:

1 Prostitution: work or oppression? Amélie Mathieu Communications and Development officer Regional intervention women group assembly Canada (Québec)

2 Menu PROSTITUTION: WORK OR OPPRESSION? Canadian History of prostitution Bill C-36 Pro-sex workers’ reactions Abolitionists CONCLUSION

3 Pro-sex workersAbolitionists Define prostitution as a job, and therefore wish to protect prostitutes by invalidating any law that would stop them from working, and by providing extra supervision for the industry. Australia (1980) Germany (2002) Netherlands (2000) New-Zeeland (2003) See prostitution as sexual exploitation, and opt to promote sex-trade workers’ safety by penalizing clients and pimps whom they identify as both a threat, and the source of human trafficking success. Sweden (1999) Norway (2009) Island (2009) France (2013). Even though these two opposite views share the common goal of protecting sex workers, they contemplate different legal means for this achievement. Two positions, same goal

4 Canadian History of prostitution 2014: The government submitted Bill C-36 regarding prostitution. 2013: The Supreme Court of Canada decriminalized prostitution, and gave the government no more than one year to adopt a new legislative model.

5 Canadian History of prostitution 1892: Prostitution was mentioned for the first time in the Criminal Code. 1985: Bill C-49 modernized the Criminal Code’s disposition towards soliciting. "Every person who in a public place or in any place open to public view communicates or attempts to communicate with any person for the purpose of engaging in prostitution or of obtaining the sexual services of a prostitute is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction. " 1989: The Government adopted it in order to "solve the problem of nuisance, not the prostitution problem in whole“ Federal-Provincial-Territorial Smith Working Group on Prostitution

6 Bill C-36 June 4, 2014: Bill C-36 "Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act" Based upon the abolitionist legislative model – Sweden – Norway – Island – France Penalises clients and pimps without penalising sex- trade workers. Particularity of the Canadian model: does not exclude the possibility of criminalizing prostitutes who solicit, and offer sexual services.

7 Pro-sex workers’ reactions Bill C-36… Goes against the Charter of Rights and Freedoms Puts prostitutes at risk Penalising clients and pimps, and forbidding the advertisement of services will affect prostitutes way more than it may help them in their work Reduces the consumer demand for sexual services, a 40% decrease of clients

8 Pro-sex workers’ reactions The purpose of banning third parties from capitalising on prostitution is to abolish sexual service businesses online, escort services, massage parlours, and strip clubs that also provide sexual services. This will force prostitutes who no longer have access to this type of supervision, to find clients on their own, and to work in more clandestine places, closer to criminals Prohibition of advertising services online or in other publications will make it even harder for prostitutes to find clients Prostitutes risk being incarcerated if they get caught advertising, or soliciting near schools, day-care centres, parks, or churches – This criminal infraction is special alteration of the Canadian Government to the traditional Nordic model. Normally, this type of legislative framework does not penalise prostitutes in any way.

9 Pro-sex workers’ reactions Pro-sex workers ask for a legal framework that would allow prostitutes to work in the safest possible conditions, while also limiting inconvenience for the rest of society, and fighting criminal networks that exploit minors, vulnerable women, and out-of-status immigrants. November 30, 2013- Sex-trade workers in France protest against the new law penalizing clients

10 Abolitionists Bill C-36… Is a weapon against sexual exploitation Fights the black market at its source by penalising clients and pimps, and prohibiting advertisement or solicitation of sexual services Prostitution = an "organized worldwide system, governed by pimps that recruits, buys and sells women and girls forced to be prostitutes by misery, violence or illusion, as they have no other option.“

11 Abolitionists Statistics show the necessity of fighting human trafficking Investigations carried out in several countries reveal that 89% or more of prostitute women wish to leave prostitution, and none of them would like their own daughter to do this type of "work. The human trafficking market’s profit in my region, Outaouais, alone is of more than 25 million dollars and 90% of human trafficking victims in Ottawa and Gatineau are Canadians.

12 Abolitionists The Stockholm prostitution centre declared that 60% of its clientele quit prostitution after the abolitionist legislative model was established. Many admitted that the law motivated them to find help and quit prostitution. June 13, 2013 – Abolitionists’ protest in front of the Supreme Court of Canada at the beginning of Bedford hearings

13 CONCLUSION Raising our governments’ awareness for the issue of prostitution Investing in police training and in organizations that work with survivor prostitutes Tackling poverty, violence and our capitalist society's engine

14 Regional intervention women group assembly Thank you! Together for Equality www.agir-outaouais.ca


Download ppt "Prostitution: work or oppression? Amélie Mathieu Communications and Development officer Regional intervention women group assembly Canada (Québec)"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google