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EXPLANATION FOR THE FACILITATOR This is a 1-hour awareness-raising training on sexual exploitation and abuse by personnel of the UN, NGOs and other international.

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Presentation on theme: "EXPLANATION FOR THE FACILITATOR This is a 1-hour awareness-raising training on sexual exploitation and abuse by personnel of the UN, NGOs and other international."— Presentation transcript:

1 EXPLANATION FOR THE FACILITATOR This is a 1-hour awareness-raising training on sexual exploitation and abuse by personnel of the UN, NGOs and other international organizations. It is designed for OCHA headquarters and was initially used from , facilitated by the chief of OCHA Human Resources, the chief of OCHA Staff Development and Learning Section (SDLS) and staff of the Policy Development and Studies Branch. Uses It can be used for further trainings at OCHA HQ, or adapted for the field or even for other UN and non-UN entities. For adaptations, refer to the “Facilitation Guide: for facilitated presentation of the film ‘To Serve with Pride’ on prevention of sexual exploitation and abuse by United Nations and related personnel” (available at Materials to provide at the session (all available from SDLS) -This Powerpoint, which starts with the next slide, and equipment to show it. -The notes attached to each slide can be used as a basis for facilitating the session. -DVD: “To Serve with Pride: Zero Tolerance for Sexual Exploitation and Abuse” and equipment to show it. -Attendance sheet (place in the room and ask everyone to sign in) -A folder should be given at the start of each session to all participants, including: -The Secretary-General’s Bulletin on Special Measures for Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Sexual Abuse (ST/SGB/2003/13) -The Secretary-General’s Bulletin on Prohibition of Discrimination, Including Sexual Harassment, and Abuse of Authority (ST/SGB/2008/5) -The Secretary General’s Bulletin on whistleblowing (ST/SGB/2005/21) -A form to acknowledge receipt of the SGB on SEA -Frequently Asked Questions on SEA

2 Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse Preventing and Responding to Sexual Exploitation and Abuse by UN Personnel and the Broader Humanitarian Community

3 SEA in Humanitarian Community Save the Children report - May 2008 Save the Children report - May 2008 “No one to turn to” “No one to turn to” HAP report – June 2008 HAP report – June 2008 “To complain or not to complain”

4 Session Objectives Understanding SEA by UN/NGO/IGO personnel, its widespread occurrence and its consequences Understanding SEA by UN/NGO/IGO personnel, its widespread occurrence and its consequences Discovering what we can do to prevent and respond to SEA Discovering what we can do to prevent and respond to SEA

5 Sexual Harassment vs. Sexual Exploitation and Abuse Sexual harassment: any unwanted sexual advance, request for sexual favour, verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature Sexual harassment: any unwanted sexual advance, request for sexual favour, verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature Takes place in the workplace between UN personnel Takes place in the workplace between UN personnel For further info: ST/SGB/2008/5, FAQs (in your packets), take the mandatory on-line course! For further info: ST/SGB/2008/5, FAQs (in your packets), take the mandatory on-line course!

6 Sexual Exploitation and Sexual Abuse Sexual Exploitation: actual or attempted abuse of a position of: Sexual Exploitation: actual or attempted abuse of a position of: vulnerability vulnerability differential power; or differential power; or trust trust for sexual purposes, including, but not limited to, profiting monetarily, socially or politically from the sexual exploitation of another. Sexual Abuse: actual or threatened physical intrusion of a sexual nature, whether: Sexual Abuse: actual or threatened physical intrusion of a sexual nature, whether: by force by force under unequal conditions or under unequal conditions or under coercive conditions. under coercive conditions.

7 Film

8 What are the consequences? For Victim For Victim For Children Born As Result For Children Born As Result For Community For Community For the Organisation For the Organisation

9 POWER! SEA is almost always linked to Power and differential power relationships. SEA is almost always linked to Power and differential power relationships.

10 What if they consent?

11 The SGB Defines our obligations to prevent SEA Defines our obligations to prevent SEA SEA constitutes serious misconduct and grounds for disciplinary measures SEA constitutes serious misconduct and grounds for disciplinary measures Aims to protect the most vulnerable - not to prevent sexual relationships. Aims to protect the most vulnerable - not to prevent sexual relationships. Covers all personnel (humanitarian, peacekeeping, development, staff, consultants). Covers all personnel (humanitarian, peacekeeping, development, staff, consultants).

12 Scenario 1 A father approaches John, an NGO worker, and offers his 16 year daughter to him. John replies that she is too young. The father tells him that in that country, the age of consent is 16, so it is legal. John asks you if he is allowed to engage in sexual relations with people under the age of 18 if the local age of consent is younger. How would you reply?

13 Scenario 2 You are serving in an OCHA field office as an HAO. You meet an attractive man who lives in a refugee camp nearby. You meet with him a few times, giving him rides to and from a local market, buying him food and drinks while you are out walking together. As you are not directly involved in assisting him as a beneficiary and you genuinely like him, you think that it is permissible to have a sexual relationship with him. Is this correct?

14 Scenario 3 You are in HQ and speaking to Agnes, a colleague in the field, who mentions in passing that Charlie, another colleague in the field office, frequents a local bar which is rumored to be a brothel. Agnes once saw Charlie leave with a young woman who could have been a prostitute. What would you do?

15 Reporting: Obligation What? What? Required to report any complaints, concerns, suspicions or rumours regarding SEA. Required to report any complaints, concerns, suspicions or rumours regarding SEA. By whom? By whom? Whether by personnel of UN or UN partner or anyone else in the humanitarian community. Whether by personnel of UN or UN partner or anyone else in the humanitarian community.

16 Reporting: Procedures To whom? There are multiple channels. There are multiple channels. Not necessary to follow the normal chain of command or go through your supervisor. Not necessary to follow the normal chain of command or go through your supervisor. Some reporting options: Some reporting options: OCHA Executive Office (Human Resources Chief)OCHA Executive Office (Human Resources Chief) Head of OfficeHead of Office SEA Focal PointSEA Focal Point Outside source – SEA Focal Point or HoO in another agency, OIOS, etc.Outside source – SEA Focal Point or HoO in another agency, OIOS, etc.

17 Reporting: Procedures How to report? Can report through , phone, in person, on paper, etc. Can report through , phone, in person, on paper, etc. Can report anonymously. Can report anonymously. Include all known information (ex: a car with A license plate was parked outside B brothel during C hours on D date) but do not investigate. Include all known information (ex: a car with A license plate was parked outside B brothel during C hours on D date) but do not investigate.

18 Reporting: You are Protected Confidentiality Confidentiality Retaliation against a staff member because he/she made a good faith report of SEA is prohibited by another SGB, referred to as the “whistle blower SGB.” Retaliation against a staff member because he/she made a good faith report of SEA is prohibited by another SGB, referred to as the “whistle blower SGB.” Fraudulent allegations that you know are false are misconduct and not protected. Fraudulent allegations that you know are false are misconduct and not protected.

19 Summary SEA has serious consequences for victims, their communities and us as humanitarian workers!! SEA has serious consequences for victims, their communities and us as humanitarian workers!! Think “Is this SEA?” before entering into a relationship. Think “Is this SEA?” before entering into a relationship. Report: “If you see something, say something.” Report: “If you see something, say something.”

20 Fill in evaluation Sign acknowledgement and Thank you!


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