Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Renaissance 1400-1600 “rebirth” A time of renewed interest in science, art and religion.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Renaissance 1400-1600 “rebirth” A time of renewed interest in science, art and religion."— Presentation transcript:

1 Renaissance “rebirth” A time of renewed interest in science, art and religion.

2 Masaccio Painter His most famous work can be found in the Brancacci Chapel in Santa Maria del Carmine in Florence. Brancacci Chapel in Santa Maria del Carmine in Florence.

3 Donatello Sculptor Famous for many things including the youthful sculpture of David in Florence. 1440

4 Brunelleschi Architect The church, on which construction began in 1299, is crowned by the massive dome designed by Brunelleschi almost two centuries later. This building did not have a roof for over 175 years because it posed a major architectural challenge with the large area the dome had to span.

5 Leonardo da Vinci scholar/artist People were recognizing their value as humans and looking beyond religion toward science to understand the workings of their universe. One of the greatest minds of that period was Leonardo da Vinci. Through his art you can see his meticulousness and passion, through his science, you can see his wisdom and creativity.

6 Leonardo da Vinci Vitruvian Man divine proportion

7 Mona LisaTechnique Sfumato – The idea of sfumato was to blend one shade into another in order to create perceptions of depth, form and volume. The most famous example of this technique is the Mona Lisa.

8 Michelangelo Buonarroti A skilled painter who spent many years completing the frescoes that adorn the Sistine Chapel, Michelangelo had trained as a sculptor and created two of the world's greatest statues--the enormous David and the emotional Pieta.

9 Michelangelo Buonarroti PietaDavid

10 Technique Fresco There are two types of frescoes, buon fresco and fresco secco. Buon fresco consisted of mixing pigments with water, and in fresco secco pigments were mixed with binding agents and painted on dry plaster.

11 Frescos of the Sistine Chapel

12 Bellini Agony in the Garden 1465

13 Hans Holbein the Younger – The Ambassadors

14 Technique Foreshortening The idea of foreshortening is meant to add depth to a painting by creating the illusion of objects retreating into a background. One artist known for this technique was Andrea Mantegna.

15 Titian Titian's first major public commission in Venice, the Assumption of the Virgin for the high altar of Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari (1516–18), established his place as the leading painter of the city

16 Tintoretto The Wedding Feast at Cana, c.1545

17 Technique Humanism and Perspective – Humanism was a means of reverting back to the classical ideologies. The idea of perspective is to create a three-dimensional appearance on a two- dimensional object (e.g. canvas).

18 Botticelli The Birth of Venus is a 1486 painting by Sandro Botticelli. It depicts the goddess Venus, having emerged from the sea as a fully grown woman, arriving at the sea- shore. The painting is held in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence.

19 Caravaggio The Sacrifice of Isaac ; Oil on canvas

20 Technique Chiaroscuro – This type of painting uses the contrast of light and dark to create dimension to a painting, which gives the illusion of depth or three-dimensionality. An example of this technique would be works by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, who developed tenebrism (a form of chiaroscuro where objects appear to emerge from blackness).

21 Lorenzo Ghiberti Gates of Paradise – Joseph being sold into slavery(below)

22 Raphael The School of Athens ( ) Fresco

23 Technique Perspective – Raphael’s best-known ‘prospettiva’ is the ‘School of Athens’, a fresco painted on one wall of the Raphaelle Stanze at the Vatican in 1510 (Figs. 4 & 6). It is a pre-eminent example of the perspective construction, evoking a strong sense of both depth and classical spirit

24 Use of perspective

25 Pieter Brueghel the Elder Return of the Hunters – Oil on wood

26 Hieronymus Bosch Garden of Earthly Delights Exterior panels closed

27 Garden of Earthy Delights Triptych-three panels

28 Jan Van Eyck Arnolfini Wedding the artist has juxtaposed secular and religious themes in a work that seems to have several levels of meaning” (Stokstad 600) including:The chandelier has one lit candle signifying matrimony and the unity of marriage (Stokstad 600);

29 The man uses his left hand to support but does not grasp the women’s hand. He holds his right hand up as if he is taking an oath (Kloss 95);The removed shoes suggest sanctity (Crenshaw 29); The spotless convex mirror on the back wall alludes to purity, and the reflection of two other individuals in the room (including the painter) infers that witnesses are present

30 Technique Glazing Glazing is a technique employed by Flemish masters such as J. Van Eyck. A painting began with transparent glazes that differentiated the shadows; the bulk of the painting included dark tones. To create softer transitions between the edges of these dark tones, a painter applied transparent glazes that soften the lines over transitional areas of the painting; in the same way, a tinted lens will change the image perceived by a camera.

31 Albrecht Durer

32 Technique Grid – The Dürer Grid is a modern adaptation of the historic drawing tool used by Renaissance artists, such as Da Vinci and Dürer. It is attributed to Albrecht Dürer, whose masterful drawings of the 16th century still amaze us for their realism.

33 Giuseppe Arcimboldo FireVertumnus

34 Andrea Mantegna The Lamentation over the Dead Christ Tempera on canvas, 68x81 cm,

35 Technique Foreshortening The idea of foreshortening is meant to add depth to a painting by creating the illusion of objects retreating into a background. One artist known for this technique was Andrea Mantegna.


Download ppt "Renaissance 1400-1600 “rebirth” A time of renewed interest in science, art and religion."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google