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Provided by Barbara Brown, Ph.D., R.D./L.D. Food Specialist, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Assoc. Prof., Department of Nutritional Sciences Home.

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Presentation on theme: "Provided by Barbara Brown, Ph.D., R.D./L.D. Food Specialist, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Assoc. Prof., Department of Nutritional Sciences Home."— Presentation transcript:

1 Provided by Barbara Brown, Ph.D., R.D./L.D. Food Specialist, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Assoc. Prof., Department of Nutritional Sciences Home Canned Salsa Workshop 2015

2 Step-By-Step Canning of Salsa 2 This slide show is a description of typical steps in boiling water canning of tomato-pepper salsas at home. It is not intended to be a specific recipe and not all steps may apply in every recipe. It is not intended to be used with salsa recipes that have not been tested and determined to be safe for boiling water canning. Recommended salsa recipes can be found at the National Center for Home Food Preservation website at: Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

3 2015 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 3

4 Prepare the Canner 4 Make sure there is a rack in the bottom of your canner. Fill boiling water canner about half full of water, and begin heating it. You need enough water so the filled jars will be covered with 1 to 2 inches of water over the tops. Water temperature should be about 180°F when it is time to add your filled jars Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

5 Prepare the Jars and Lids 5 Select the number of pint jars the recipe indicates it will make. Check jars for nicks and/or cracks. Select jar rings that display no rust or bending, and new flat lids. Wash everything in warm, soapy water. Rinse well. Keep jars in warm water while you prepare the salsa. Follow directions from the lid manufacturer for preparing that specific type of lid. Jars do not need to be sterilized Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

6 Preparing lids: Ball/Kerr lids no longer require warming before use 2015 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 6 Still safe to simmer lids before use, however, never boil Recommendation for over 40 years has been to simmer (180°F), not boil (212°F) Change made in 1969 Switched sealing gasket from latex-based to Plastisol Latex required pre-heating to soften prior to canning in order to create an effective seal, Plastisol does not but doing so will not damage it Removing simmering step was designed to make the home canning process easier, speedier Current recommendation is to wash lids with warm, soapy water and keep at room temperature until ready for use

7 Have extra hot water available Have an extra pot of water heating in case you need more to add to the canner at processing time Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 7

8 8 Collect the Ingredients Tomatoes (use the type in your recipe) Peppers (use the type in your recipe) Onion Vinegar (5%) Pickling or canning salt Your recipe may also include Cloves of garlic Dried seasoning Black pepper, oregano leaves, ground cumin, etc. Fresh herbs—cilantro, parsley, basil, etc Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

9 9 To prepare the tomatoes Wash tomatoes. Make an “x”-shaped slit in the skin at the base of each tomato. Dip washed tomatoes into boiling water for seconds until skins just begin to split. Dip immediately into cold water. Slip skins off tomatoes and core them. Chop tomatoes into small pieces. Measure out the required amount Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

10 To prepare the peppers 10 Caution: Wear plastic or rubber gloves and do not touch your face while handling or cutting hot peppers. Wash hands thoroughly before touching your face or eyes. Wash peppers well. Cut peppers lengthwise. Remove stems and white membranes. Remove seeds; the more seeds you remove, the milder the salsa. Chop the peppers into small pieces. Measure out required amount Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

11 To prepare the onions and garlic 11 Remove the outer skin. Wash onion and garlic cloves well. Cut away any sprouting, tough stem or root end parts. Chop the onions into small pieces. Use a garlic press to for garlic (or mince finely by hand). Measure the required amount of each Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

12 Cook the Salsa 12 Canned salsa is a hot pack. Combine all measured prepared vegetables in a large saucepot with the vinegar and seasonings. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently. Reduce the heat and simmer as directed, stirring occasionally Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

13 Fill the Jars, part 1 13 Fill hot salsa into clean, hot canning jars. Use ladle and jar funnel to avoid getting salsa on the sealing surface (and prevent a big mess!). Leave 1/2-inch headspace, making sure liquid juices cover the pieces of food Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

14 Fill the Jars, part 2 14 Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed, leaving 1/2-inch empty. Use a plastic knife or special bubble remover tool. Do not use metal knives or spoons. Wipe the rims (top surface) of the jars with a dampened clean paper towel, to make sure no food or liquid is on them. This could interfere with sealing Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

15 Applying the Lids 15 Remove pretreated lids from the warm water, using a magnetic wand. Apply the lids to the tops of the jars. Tighten ring bands over lids until “fingertip-tight” and snug. Take care not to overtighten and cut through the warm gasket Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

16 Place the Jars in the Canner 16 The temperature of the water in the canner should be about 180°F (simmering) when it is time to add your filled jars. Carefully add jars to canner, using jar lifter. Keep them straight up; do not tilt jars. Racks for many boiling water canners have divided spaces for holding jars. If using a flat rack, fill empty jars with water and place in the empty space around your filled jars, to prevent jars of salsa from moving around or tipping over Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

17 Processing the Salsa 17 After all jars are in the canner, make sure water is 1 to 2 inches over the tops of the jars. Place lid on canner. Turn heat on high and bring water in canner to a full boil over the jars. After water is fully boiling, process jars for the required process time. Adjust time for altitude if needed. The water must never stop boiling. If it does, return water to a boil and start timing the process over from the beginning Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

18 Removing Jars from the Canner 18 After processing, turn off burner. Remove lid, turning away from you to avoid getting steam in your face. Let jars sit in canner another 5 minutes. Using jar lifter, remove jars from canner, again without tilting them, and set them on a thick clean towel, or plastic or wooden cutting board to cool. Do not sit jars directly on a cool surface Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

19 Cooling the Jars 19 Let jars sit undisturbed while cooling—between hours. If jars seal properly, the lid will be curved inward and there will be a clear ringing sound when tapped Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

20 Storing the Jars 20 Remove ring bands from sealed jars. Gently wash lid area and threads of the jar (in case there is any food or liquid residue that you might not even see). Then rinse and dry jars; label and date them. Store jars without ring bands in a cool, dark, dry place. Store unsealed jars in the refrigerator Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

21 How much of the recipe can I change? 2015 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 21 Peppers Range from mild to hot Wear plastic or rubber gloves when handling hot peppers and do not touch your face, particularly around the eyes If you do not wear gloves, wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before touching face or eyes Okay to substitute one type of pepper for another or mild peppers for chilies Do not increase the total amount (pounds or cups) of peppers in any recipe Changes final acidity of the mixture and potentially unsafe canned salsa

22 How much of the recipe can I change? Onions… 2015 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 22 Red and yellow onions may be substituted for each other Do not increase the total amount of onions called for in the recipe Changes the final acidity level of the salsa and can create an unsafe canned product

23 How much of the recipe can I change? Acidic ingredients… 2015 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 23 Include vinegar, commercially bottled lemon juice or lime juice Help preserve canned salsa USDA research has not been able to calculate a safe canned salsa that tastes similar to fresh salsa Recipes for home canning have larger amounts of vinegar or lemon juice, which create a more acidic flavor It’s important that the amount of acid in the recipe is never reduced. While an equal amount of bottled lemon juice may be substituted for vinegar in recipes, do not substitute vinegar for lemon juice — this could result in less acidity and potentially unsafe canned salsa.

24 How much of the recipe can I change? Spices and herbs… 2015 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 24 Amounts can be altered, with no risk of creating a potentially unsafe canned salsa. For a stronger cilantro flavor in recipes with cilantro, it is suggested to add fresh cilantro just before serving instead of adding more before canning.

25 How much of the recipe can I change? Thickeners… 2015 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 25 Do not thicken salsas with flour, cornstarch or other starches before canning. Add these ingredients after opening canned salsa

26 What if I want to make my own recipe? 2015 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 26 If your personal favorite salsa doesn’t have a tested recipe for home canning, eat your creation fresh, storing it up to one week in the refrigerator. Store all open salsas in the refrigerator once opened

27 Do I have to process my salsa in a boiling water canner? 2015 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 27 Method is called open kettle canning Results in a high rate of food spoilage, potential illness Although food is hot and may be fully cooked, it is difficult to reach and maintain temperatures for time needed to destroy spoilage microorganisms If not destroyed, the food can spoil even though the lid is tightly closed

28 Choice Salsa 2015 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 28 6 cups peeled, cored, seeded and chopped ripe tomatoes 9 cups diced onions and/or peppers of any variety (See Notes below) 1 and ½ cups commercially bottled lemon or lime juice 3 teaspoons canning or pickling salt Yield: About 6 pint jars CAUTION: Wear plastic or rubber gloves and do not touch your face while handling or cutting hot peppers. If you do not wear gloves, wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before touching your face or eyes.

29 Procedure: 2015 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 29 Wash and rinse pint or half-pint canning jars; keep hot until ready to fill. Prepare lids and ring bands according to manufacturer’s directions. To prepare tomatoes: Dip washed tomatoes in boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds or until the skins split. Submerge immediately in cold water. Peel off loosened skins and remove cores. Remove seeds and chop (¼- to ½-inch pieces). To prepare onions: Peel, wash, core and dice onions (¼-inch pieces). To prepare bell peppers: Wash and core bell peppers. Remove the seeds and membranes before dicing (¼-inch pieces). To prepare hot peppers: Wash and remove stems of hot peppers. Keep or remove as much of the seeds and membranes as you wish, depending on the ‘pepper heat’ of the salsa that you desire. Dice peppers (¼-inch pieces).

30 Procedure: 2015 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 30 Combine prepared ingredients in a large pot; add lemon juice and salt. Bring to a boil over medium heat while stirring. Reduce heat and simmer salsa for an additional 3 minutes, stirring as needed to prevent scorching. Fill the hot salsa into prepared hot jars, leaving 1/2- inch headspace. If needed, remove air bubbles and re-adjust headspace to ½-inch. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel. Adjust lids and bands. Process in a boiling water canner according to the recommendations in Table 1. Let cool, undisturbed, 12 to 24 hours and check for seals.Table 1

31 2015 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 31 Table 1. Recommended process time for Choice Salsa in a boiling-water canner. Process Time at Altitudes of Style of Pack Jar Size 0 – 1,000 ft 1,001 – 6,000 ft Above 6,000 ft Hot Half-pint or Pint Jars 15 min20 min25 min

32 Labinstructions 2015 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 32 Meet in room 002 HS in 1 hour Work in groups of 3 (or so) Make 1 batch Choice Salsa (handout) per group Use about 2 cups onion, 7 cups peppers (can swap with another group to change ratio—stay with 9 cups total Wear disposable gloves when working with Jalapeños Refrigerated foods will be in silver refrigerator Pint jars will be in dishwasher, 6 per recipe You will need to wash your own lids Be precise, be patient, be polite

33 Credits 33 Reprinted with permission of the University of Georgia. National Center for Home Food Preservation and Simmons, H Step-By-Step Canning of Tomato Salsa Using Slicing Tomatoes. Athens, GA: The University of Georgia, Cooperative Extension. This slide set was developed by Heather Simmons as a student project in FDNS 3010, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, and edited by faculty of the National Center for Home Food Preservation, June This material is based upon work supported by the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, under Agreement No Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

34 2015 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service 34


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