Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The Chemistry of Art Elizabeth Wise, Ph.D. Lourdes College Elizabeth Wise, Ph.D. Lourdes College.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The Chemistry of Art Elizabeth Wise, Ph.D. Lourdes College Elizabeth Wise, Ph.D. Lourdes College."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Chemistry of Art Elizabeth Wise, Ph.D. Lourdes College Elizabeth Wise, Ph.D. Lourdes College

2 Preparation Course Materials: NSF Center for Workshops in the Chemical Sciences, http://chemistry.gsu.edu/CWCS/ http://chemistry.gsu.edu/CWCS/ Text: Barbara R. Greenberg and Dianne Patterson, Art in Chemistry; Chemistry in Art. Teacher Ideas Press: Westport, Connecticut, 2008. Course Materials: NSF Center for Workshops in the Chemical Sciences, http://chemistry.gsu.edu/CWCS/ http://chemistry.gsu.edu/CWCS/ Text: Barbara R. Greenberg and Dianne Patterson, Art in Chemistry; Chemistry in Art. Teacher Ideas Press: Westport, Connecticut, 2008.

3 General Information Audience: undergraduate non-science majors; undergraduate science majors; high school students; summer workshops for students in grades 5-10 or for teachers Format: 2.5-hour class with integrated lab/studio activities Audience: undergraduate non-science majors; undergraduate science majors; high school students; summer workshops for students in grades 5-10 or for teachers Format: 2.5-hour class with integrated lab/studio activities

4 Overview of Topics Basics ▪ Light, Color, and Matter (inorganic & organic) Applications of Chemistry in Art ▪ Paint Media ▪ Pigments and Dyes ▪ Glass and Ceramics ▪ Polymers ▪ Metals ▪ Photography ▪ Conservation and Restoration Basics ▪ Light, Color, and Matter (inorganic & organic) Applications of Chemistry in Art ▪ Paint Media ▪ Pigments and Dyes ▪ Glass and Ceramics ▪ Polymers ▪ Metals ▪ Photography ▪ Conservation and Restoration

5 Class Activities Chromatography of pen inks T-shirts with flower patterns or element symbols Compare/contrast different paint media Shrinky Dinks Borax crystal shapes Frescoes Etched glass Super sculpey or ceramics project Anodize niobium wire Cyanotypes Chromatography of pen inks T-shirts with flower patterns or element symbols Compare/contrast different paint media Shrinky Dinks Borax crystal shapes Frescoes Etched glass Super sculpey or ceramics project Anodize niobium wire Cyanotypes

6

7 Demonstrations Karen Timberlake, author of GOB and basic chemistry texts Steve Spangler, http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/ Karen Timberlake, author of GOB and basic chemistry texts Steve Spangler, http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/

8 Science Academic Content Standards Physical Sciences, Grades 9-10 Describe that matter is made of minute particles called atoms and atoms are comprised of even smaller components. Explain the structure and properties of atoms. Explain how atoms react with each other to form other substances and how molecules react with each other or other atoms to form even different substances. Describe that matter is made of minute particles called atoms and atoms are comprised of even smaller components. Explain the structure and properties of atoms. Explain how atoms react with each other to form other substances and how molecules react with each other or other atoms to form even different substances.

9 Physical Sciences, Grades 9-10 (cont.) Describe the identifiable physical properties of substances (e.g. color, hardness, conductivity, density, concentration and ductility). Explain how changes in these properties can occur without changing the chemical nature of the substance. Demonstrate that waves (e.g. sound, seismic, water and light) have energy and waves can transfer energy when they interact with matter. Describe the identifiable physical properties of substances (e.g. color, hardness, conductivity, density, concentration and ductility). Explain how changes in these properties can occur without changing the chemical nature of the substance. Demonstrate that waves (e.g. sound, seismic, water and light) have energy and waves can transfer energy when they interact with matter.

10 Science Academic Content Standards Physical Sciences, Grades 11-12 Explain how variations in the arrangement and motion of atoms and molecules form the basis of a variety of biological, chemical and physical phenomena. Describe how atoms and molecules can gain or lose energy only in discrete amounts. Explain how variations in the arrangement and motion of atoms and molecules form the basis of a variety of biological, chemical and physical phenomena. Describe how atoms and molecules can gain or lose energy only in discrete amounts.

11 PowerPoint Basics

12 Components of Presentation Ask for input Provide information Evaluate learning Class Activity Ask for input Provide information Evaluate learning Class Activity

13 Paint Binders Film-Forming Polymers

14 Work with a partner to... List examples of Can you describe basic polymer structure?

15 Polymers — What Are They? Hundreds or thousands of monomers MACROMOLECULES - high mol. wt. Natural and Synthetic Polymers POLY = many MER = parts or units MONOMER = basic unit

16 Natural Polymers Came First Proteins Hair, wool, fur, silk, casein Carbohydrates Cellulose (cotton), starch, plant gums Rubber Extract of rubber tree

17 Natural Polymers Proteins Carbohydrates

18 Synthetic Polymers = Plastics Celluloid - 1869 - substitute for ivory Rayon - 1878 - substitute for silk Bakelite - 1907 - first wholly synthetic Nylon - 1939 - intro at NY World’s Fair Polyethylene, polyesters, Teflon® -1930’s Polycarbonates - 1950’s Polyaramids - bullet-proof vests

19 Some Polymer Trade Names Formica Dacron (polyester) Mylar Plexiglass Lucite Orlon Saran Teflon Kevlar

20 Plastics are Polymers Thermoplastic polymers  soften and flow when heated  re-harden when cooled  easily molded  easily recycled Thermoset polymers  do not soften with heat, cannot be remelted  heat resistent  rigid and hard

21 Types of Polymers Linear Polymers — THERMOPLASTIC Branched Polymers — THERMOPLASTIC

22 Types of Polymers Cross-linked Polymers — THERMOSETS Usually more rigid or stiff

23 Uses of Polymeric Materials Synthetic fibers Plastic films Synthetic rubber (silicone rubber) Adhesives and binding agents

24 Polymers in Art Paper Fibers Paint Binders and Glues

25 Primary binder functions... 1. Executive — makes paint spreadable 2. Binding — adheres pigment to surface 3. Film-forming — encloses and protects pigment from atmospheric chemicals 4. Optical — alters appearance by absorption, reflection and refraction of light

26 Film-Forming Agents Lipids (fats, oils, waxes)  Oil paint, egg tempera paint, encaustic paint Carbohydrates (sugars and starches)  Watercolor and gouache paint, gum adhesives and glues Proteins  Milk paint, egg tempera paint, adhesives Terpene Resins (essential plant oils)  Varnishes Synthetic Polymers  Acrylic and Alkyd binders

27 Learning Check Which of the following is a primary binder function? a) adheres pigment to surface b) makes paint spreadable c) alters appearance by absorption, reflection, or refraction of light d) all of the above Which category of binder is used in watercolor? a) carbohydrate b) lipid c) protein d) synthetic polymer

28 Learning Check Which of the following is NOT true of fats? a) contain mainly saturated fatty acids b) have high melting points c) are solid or semi-solid d) derived from plant sources Which of the following represents the building blocks of carbohydrates? a) amino acids b) fatty acids c) monosaccharides d) polysaccharides

29 Class Activity Shrinky Dinks


Download ppt "The Chemistry of Art Elizabeth Wise, Ph.D. Lourdes College Elizabeth Wise, Ph.D. Lourdes College."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google