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The Living Learning Laboratory: Understanding our Water Footprint Presented by: Jonathan Lanciani, Sustainable Water 2014 Energy & Sustainability Conference.

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Presentation on theme: "The Living Learning Laboratory: Understanding our Water Footprint Presented by: Jonathan Lanciani, Sustainable Water 2014 Energy & Sustainability Conference."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Living Learning Laboratory: Understanding our Water Footprint Presented by: Jonathan Lanciani, Sustainable Water 2014 Energy & Sustainability Conference

2 Overview The Technology Campus Initiatives Water Issues Water Reuse

3 Water: The Lynchpin to University Life Solutions for a Range of End Users

4 Sustainability Efforts on University Campuses But what about water?? Water use ROSE 9% in 2010 Laundry optimization Low-flow fixtures Motion-sensor toilets Waterless urinals Green infrastructure Rainwater and grey water reuse

5 Virginia’s Water Apocalypse Risks: Rates, Availability, Infrastructure, Environmental Pressure Only 5-10% of “drinking” water produced will be used for consumption. Only 5-10% of “drinking” water produced will be used for consumption. History of drought in Virginia

6 Water in Richmond, VA Water is the lifeblood of metro Atlanta. We need it to live. We need it to thrive. But we live in the headwaters at the top of the watershed. Ninety-nine percent of our water comes from small rivers and streams, with only two large reservoirs. And, our water resources are shared by many other users as it makes it w to the coast. That’s why using water wisely is so important. Atlanta Regional Commission. Water Conservation

7 Environmental Pressure Water problems upstream affect those downstream as well Water is the lifeblood of metro Atlanta. We need it to live. We need it to thrive. But we live in the headwaters at the top of the watershed. Ninety-nine percent of our water comes from small rivers and streams, with only two large reservoirs. And, our water resources are shared by many other users as it makes it way to the coast. That’s why using water wisely is so important. Atlanta Regional Commission. Water Conservation Richmond’s CSO system is the largest in the state Because Richmond is downstream from Lynchburg, our water requires more treatment. James River is an impaired water way. Richmond’s CSO system is the largest in the state Because Richmond is downstream from Lynchburg, our water requires more treatment. James River is an impaired water way.

8 Richmond Water & Sewer Rates Combined rates are rising by an average 9% annually

9 Comprehensive Water Management Impactful Water Management Solutions Primary Treatment Stage 1 Stage 2 Reuse System Filter & Disinfectio n Stormwater Management Water Reclamation & Reuse Water Conservation Efficiency Environment Compliance Community Cost

10 2012 Water Use by Type: Typical University 42% Considered Non-potable Demand Cooling Irrigation Domestic/ Sanitary Domestic/ Sanitary Over 442 Million GPY

11 A more sustainable water cycle… Decentralized Reclamation and Reuse Before After

12 Solution: Reuse Water Eliminate Risks, Save Money and Increase Sustainability Cost Savings Discounted water rates Reduced potable water intake Reduced sewer fees Environmental & Social Decreases diversion of water from ecosystems Decreases wastewater discharge Net energy efficiency gains Reclaimed water shows no danger to public health Operational De-risks operations with an alternative water source Protects against mandatory conservation programs

13 Reclaimed Water in the News Reuse is becoming the norm, not the exception

14 Risk Mitigation N+1: Reliable and Safe Alternatives to Potable Water Provides Organizations with: Redundant Water Supply –Drought –Municipal infrastructure failures Additional On-Site Storage Flexibility & Resilience Independence Availability in the event of failure Minimum recovery time Insulation from rising water costs Drought Rising Rates Aging Infrastructure

15 Water & Sewer Facilities Atlanta, GA Emory University Google Data Center Polebridge WWTP Snapfinger WWTP RM Clayton WWTP Cherokee Water Reuse Fowler Water Reuse Cauley Water Reuse Johns Creek Environmental Scott Candler Drinking Plant

16 Centralized vs. Decentralized Reuse Impractical for Richmond, VA Centralized Systems: Usually Cost Prohibitive Water Treatment FacilityEnd User ~10+ miles Wastewater Reclaimed Water The Embodied Energy of Water Extensive infrastructure Lack of consistent demand/revenue Increased operational costs

17 Overview Provides opportunity for student engagement Equipment inventory Program admin. WW flow projections Economic assessment Water balance & use Non-potable demand Infrastructure review Regulatory review Water Footprint Assessment & Economic Validation Utility Water Assessment Site & Infrastructure Assessment Water quality needs Reclaimed water modeling Prelim. siting & design Lifecycle Savings

18 Student Involvement Every Step of the Way Engagement, experiential learning for the future.

19 Water Purchase Agreement Water is Principal to Facility Operations Flexible project financing arrangements utilizing : ~ Performance Contracts ~ Operating Leases ~ Design-Build Agreements Flexible project financing arrangements utilizing : ~ Performance Contracts ~ Operating Leases ~ Design-Build Agreements Benefits No up-front capital Innovative Technologies Leverages superior credit rating Immediate, Guaranteed Savings Long Term Pricing Stability No O&M Responsibilities SW bares majority of risk The Process 1.Perform feasibility / preliminary engineering 2.Develop terms & conditions for WPA 3.Sign Final Contract 4.Review & acceptance of design standards 5.Develop Guaranteed Maximum Price 6.Confirm constructability & final budget 7.Submission for all permits 8.Final design & construction drawings 9.Construct facility & distribution piping 10.Commission facility

20 Seasonal Demand vs Resources 99% of NPD can be displaced by Cen & Med Campus WW Resources

21 Gross Campus Water Use EXAMPLE: GEORGIA TECH

22 88,000 GPD 175,000 GPD 508,000 GPD EXAMPLE: YALE UNIVERSITY

23 Water Reuse in Urban Spaces Decentralization Creates New Dynamics: Safety, Aesthetics & Footprint VS.

24 Tidal Wetlands Hydroponic and Textile Moving Bed Bioreactor (MBBR) Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) Conventional Activated Sludge Capital Expense Operating Expense Energy Efficiency Effluent Quality Footprint Aesthetics Comparison of Technologies Customized Solutions to Meet Client Needs

25 Complex, Adaptive Ecosystems Increased Biodiversity, Reduced Energy Requirements

26 Reciprocating Tidal Wetlands Water reuse integrated into the landscape Primary Tank Paired ReCip Cells Filtration & Disinfection Reuse Tank

27 Hydroponic Technology Sustainable Design for Large Flow Volumes Aeration Artificial Media Root Zone Plants & Supporting Media Mechanical Room

28 WaterHub™ Water reuse integrated into the landscape

29 Some Independent Power Producers Currently Using Reclaimed Water Water Reuse is Prevalent Amongst IPPs

30 Utility Assessment Biological studies Corrosion studies Automation Treatability studies Equipment Integrity Biological studies Corrosion studies Automation Treatability studies Equipment Integrity Utility Feasibility and treatability studies Scale inhibitors Sludge dispersants Treatment specifications Purity studies Corrosion studies Fuel conservation studies Feasibility and treatability studies Scale inhibitors Sludge dispersants Treatment specifications Purity studies Corrosion studies Fuel conservation studies Superior Program Oversight: Unparalleled Collaboration

31 Treatment Program Effectiveness Reclaimed Water can be treated to handle corrosion and deposits. Corrosion Levels Eddy Currents Video Inspection

32 Benefits Lasting benefits to campus and community In addition to providing a guaranteed water supply during the hottest, driest months of the year, reclaiming and reusing water on- site has a positive impact on surrounding communities by: Reducing risk for water shortage and drought. Diminishing demand on community resources. Deferring capital improvements & expansions. Enabling campus growth without increasing water demand. Protecting water quality (less phosphorous & nitrogen discharge). Enhancing utility reliability with alternate sources of water. Providing student engagement, academic & research opportunities.

33 Nature’s Idea. Our Science. Jonathan Lanciani | Office: (804) | Mobile: (860) QUESTIONS? EXTENDING THE LIFECYCLE OF WATER.


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