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Why Does the Lake Community Need a Sewer Septic tanks are failing. The life expectancy of a septic tank in “ideal” conditions is 20 years. In many cases.

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Presentation on theme: "Why Does the Lake Community Need a Sewer Septic tanks are failing. The life expectancy of a septic tank in “ideal” conditions is 20 years. In many cases."— Presentation transcript:

1 Why Does the Lake Community Need a Sewer Septic tanks are failing. The life expectancy of a septic tank in “ideal” conditions is 20 years. In many cases well and septic tank setbacks cannot be met. No room for new septic systems and well are at risk for contamination. Poor soil conditions. The USDA soil maps for Van Buren and Cass Counties show nearly all of the soils around the lakes as being severe for septic tank absorption fields. Water usage and waste water has significantly increased. Many of the septic systems currently in use were installed for less water usage and under old code requirements Governor Granholm has set a goal to establish a statewide sanitary code. Many of the septic systems around our lake will not meet the new code!

2 Sewer Options Treatment Alternative 1 consists of expanding the existing Village of Lawton Wastewater Treatment Facility by MGD to serve the potential collection systems at Fish and Gravel Lakes in Marcellus and Porter Townships. The costs include adding a mechanical screen, expanding the basins, adding sludge storage, expanding the lab, control room and filter room, installing the necessary piping and electrical facilities, replacing the main control panel and installing a sludge waste meter. Treatment Alternative 2 consists of the Village of Marcellus providing treatment capacity of MGD to serve the potential collection systems at Fish and Gravel Lakes through construction of two new lagoon cells and upgrading the collection system to collect wastewater from the proposed service area. Treatment Alternate 3 consists of construction a MGD extended aeration wastewater treatment plant with tertiary treatment to serve the collection systems around Fish and Gravel Lakes. The new treatment plant would be constructed in Marcellus Township near the headwaters of the Rocky River

3 Timeline Fall 2005 Continue to work with Wightman to obtain final cost estimate Continue to provide educational material to Gravel Lake residents, including final cost estimate and financing options. Visit for latest informationhttp://gravellake.org/sewer-committee.html Spring 2006 Start petition process Spring 2007 Work with Porter Township to obtain final approval Initiate financing paperwork Initiate legal paperwork Spring 2008 Start breaking ground to install new system

4 Costs $10, per household (total of one-time fees) $40.00 per month Please Remember: These are conceptual cost estimates The final cost could increase or decrease Funding/finance options will be available

5 Typical Septic Tank and Drain Field

6 Septic Tank Cross-Section Heavy solids settle to the bottom and are decomposed by bacterial Lighter solids such as fats and greases rise to the top Liquid (effluent) leaves the septic tank and moves to drain field If accumulated solids are not regularly removed from septic tank, they will overflow into the drain field and cause premature failure of the drain field

7 Drain Field Cross-Section Drain field receives effluent from septic tank through perforated pipes Physical and biological purification processes takes place as the effluent percolates down towards lake water. The clarification of effluent works best where the soil is dry and permeable and contains plenty of oxygen for several feet below the drain field. Effluent contains pathogens (bacterial and viruses), cleaning solvents, nitrates, and phosphates

8 Sewer Facts Nitrate and phosphate foster growth of algae and weeds in lakes Nitrate concentration below drain field is two to three times higher than drinking water nitrate standards. Lakes have high water table which is how effluent moves from the drain field to the lake and wells Federal Government has cited residential septic systems as the 3 rd most common source of ground water contamination 31 states listed septic systems as their second greatest potential source of ground water contamination Signs of Failed Septic System Odors Surfacing sewage, wet spots or lush vegetation on or near the drain field Slow draining fixtures Gurgling sounds in the plumbing systems


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