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29 East Madison, Suite 602 Chicago, Il 60602 312-782-6006 www.pnhp.org www.pnhp.org THE EVIDENCE FOR SINGLE PAYER Margaret Flowers, M.D. Congressional.

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Presentation on theme: "29 East Madison, Suite 602 Chicago, Il 60602 312-782-6006 www.pnhp.org www.pnhp.org THE EVIDENCE FOR SINGLE PAYER Margaret Flowers, M.D. Congressional."— Presentation transcript:

1 29 East Madison, Suite 602 Chicago, Il THE EVIDENCE FOR SINGLE PAYER Margaret Flowers, M.D. Congressional Fellow

2 HEALTH CARE HISTORY IN 2 SLIDES: 1940’s:  Europe: The destruction of WWII required the restoration of security through social institutions. Created a system based on human rights.  The US retained an employment-based system of health care. 1960s belief:  Private insurance industry would respond quickly to a changing medical economy and cover everybody within 10 years. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2006.

3 HEALTH CARE HISTORY IN 2 SLIDES: 1980’s:  Fundamental shift occurred to private investor-owned health corporations.  Health care was perceived as a fertile field for profit seeking businesses. In this new environmen t, Health became a commodity, Health became a commodity, patients became consumers.

4 MARKET FAILURE: Expensive Poor outcomes Increasing disparities Preventable deaths Losing (esp. primary care) doctors Underinsurance/Uninsurance

5 US PUBLIC SPENDING MORE THAN TOTAL SPENDING IN OTHER NATIONS Note: “US Public” includes benefit costs for government employees and tax subsidies for private insurance Sources: OECD 2008; Health Affairs 2002;21(4)88 – Data are for 2006

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10 PNHP.org Life Expectancy, 2003 Infant Mortality, 2002/2003 Deaths in 1 st Year of Life/ 1000 Live Births Maternal Mortality, 2002/2003 Deaths / 100,000 Births MRI Units / Million Population, 2004 U.S. Health Affairs, 14 May 2009

11 INCREASING HEALTH DISPARTIES  For most core quality measures, Blacks (73%), Hispanics (77%), and poor people (71%) received worse quality care than their reference groups.  For most measures for poor people (67%) disparities were increasing.  Increasing disparities were especially prevalent in chronic disease management. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2006.

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14 PREVENTABLE DEATHS Number of preventable deaths /100,000 from treatable conditions in 19 leading industrialized nations ( ):  The best: 1. France = Japan = 71.2  The worst: 19. United States = = 101,000 preventable deaths per year! Measuring The Health Of Nations: Updating An Earlier Analysis: Ellen Nolte and C. Martin McKee Health Affairs, 27, no. 1 (2008): 58-71

15 LOSING PRIMARY CARE Shortages in pediatrics, internal medicine and family medicine. Decreased access Decreased access to geriatricians and gynecologists. Low interest by medical students Low interest by medical students because of: high student loan debt malpractice insurance low starting salaries

16 Administrators Are Growing Faster Than Physicians Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics; NCHS; Himmelstein/Woolhandler analysis of CPS 3,000% 2,000% 1,000% Physicians Administrators

17 HMO CEO’S PAY, 2009 ExecutiveFirmPay Steve HemsleyUnited$102.0 Million* Ronald WilliamsAetna$24.3 Million Edward Hanaway**Cigna$18.8 Million Angela BralyWellPoint$9.8 Million Michael McCallisterHumana$6.5 Million Dale WolfCoventry$9.0 Million Source: AFL/CIO CEO Pay Database & StarTribune 4/15/2010 * Includes exercised stock options ** Retired with $73 million bonus

18 HMO OVERHEAD, 2009 Source: SEC filings to shareholders. Calculated as (100 – Medical Loss Ratio)

19 Source:Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality MEPS, 1999 Percent of health Care Expenditures 1% 1% 2% 4% 6% 13% 73% 0% 0% 0% 80% uses less than $1000 of care per year WHO WOULD YOU INSURE?

20 EXPENSES ARE RISING FOR THE PRIVATELY INSURED Source: Bernstein D. Office of Economic Policy, US Treasury Full-year, privately-insured households with out-of-pocket expenses >$5,000 (2006 dollars)

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23 INCREASING MEDICARE HMO COPAYS DRIVE PEOPLE INTO HOSPITAL Differences between plans that did and did not raise copayments Source: NEJM :320

24 UNINSURED AND UNDERINSURED DELAY CARE FOR HEART ATTACKS *Adjusted for age, sex, race, clinical, health status, social/psych factors, urban/rural ** Under-insured = had coverage but patient concerned about cost Odds ratio for delayed care* Source: JAMA April 15, 2010:303:1392

25 UNSUSTAINABLE CYCLE! UNINSURED

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27 MOST OF THE MEDICALLY BANKRUPT HAD INSURANCE COVERAGE Source: Himmelstein et al. Am J Med, Aug Insurance at onset of illness

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29 WHO ARE THE UNINSURED? FULL-TIME WORKER 66.5% PART-TIME WORKER 14% Urban Institute and Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured estimates based on the Census Bureau's March 2008 and 2009 Current Population Survey (CPS: Annual Social and Economic Supplements). NON- WORKER 19.5%

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32 UNINSURED CHILDREN HAVE HIGHER INPATIENT MORTALITY Source: Jnl of Public Health, October 29, 2009 *Adjusted for gender, race, age, location, hospital type, and admission source Adjusted* mortality rate (%)

33 SOLUTIONS?  Mandate Model  Tort Reform Single Payer

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35 TEXAS’ 2003 TORT REFORM FAILED TO CURB MEDICAL COSTS $10,000 $5, Tort reform implemented Texas US Medicare reimbursement per enrollee, adjusted for medical service inflation Source: Public Citizen, December 2009 Note: Total malpractice payments decreased 67% between 2003 and 2008

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37 DO YOU HAVE YOUR FIRE INSURANCE CARD?

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44 A HEALTH SYSTEM THAT WE CAN BE PROUD OF: NATIONALIMPROVEDMEDICARE FOR ALL!


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