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Microproducts Breakthrough Institute Overview Rich PetersonWard TeGrotenhuis Brian PaulTerry Hendricks Goran JovanovicDan Palo Kevin DrostPacific Northwest.

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Presentation on theme: "Microproducts Breakthrough Institute Overview Rich PetersonWard TeGrotenhuis Brian PaulTerry Hendricks Goran JovanovicDan Palo Kevin DrostPacific Northwest."— Presentation transcript:

1 Microproducts Breakthrough Institute Overview Rich PetersonWard TeGrotenhuis Brian PaulTerry Hendricks Goran JovanovicDan Palo Kevin DrostPacific Northwest Chih-hung Chang National Laboratory Oregon State University

2 2 ONAMI Mission Grow Oregon’s nanoscience and microtechnology innovation capacity to leverage outside investment: Compete nationally for research $$ growth via collaborations among OHSU, OSU, PNNL, PSU and UO Attract private capital to Oregon startups seeded by a professionally managed ONAMI “gap” fund

3 3 ONAMI Shared Facilities* Nano-Materials Characterization Commercialization * not an exhaustive list of OUS-based labs offering services/collaboration to industry

4 Microproducts Breakthrough Institute An ONAMI Facility – Jointly Operated by OSU/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Goals  Provide basic science “infrastructure” to support technology development of Microchannel Process Technology (MPT) and Microreactor-Assisted Nanomanufacturing (MANX)  Development of innovative “early” product and process technology for a wide range of public and private sector applications  Support of MPT and MANX education at OSU by enabling collaboration with industrial partners  Private sector partnering for the development of specific devices and technology suites  Economic development in the Pacific Northwest Enabling High Technology Commercialization by Accelerating the R&D of Emerging Microchannel and Nanomanufacturing Process Technologies

5 DHDH L Microchannel Array Microchannel Process Technology Heat and Mass Transfer Microchannel Macrochannel where D H is the hydraulic dia. and D is the fluidic diffusivity If we reduce D macro by 10, L micro is reduced by 100.

6 Micro Energy and Chemical Systems Heat Exchanger Comparison ParameterUnitsPNNL HXCommercial HX [1] HX mass [2]Kg570 HX volume [3]L DutyWatts3500 Effectiveness%87<80 Side 1, Air dPin H2O 4.3 Side 2, Air dPin H2O 3.1

7 Microchannel Benefits AttributeBenefit Reduced SizeFactor of (volume); 5-50 (weight) – rapid heat and mass transfer & inherent high surface area to volume SafetyLow flame propagation; low inventory; fast quench Low Pressure DropReduced pumping power for same process duty Good Reaction Control Minimize undesirable side and back reactions; can process highly energetic reactions Can be Gravity Insensitive Orientation independence High IntegrationEnables complex processes in single device with higher efficiency Modular & Reconfigurable Enhances reliability, configurable in broad range of capacities, enables incremental capacity growth, testing at small capacities and more predictable scale up Mass ProductionMicrolamination approach suits mass production

8 Microfluidic Technology Microchannel Process Technology (MPT)Micro Total Analysis Systems (µTAS) BIOMEDICAL MEMS CHEMICAL BIOLOGICAL CHEMICAL ENERGY Cell sorting DNA Diagnostics Inkjet Print Heads Drug Delivery Microelectronic Cooling Automotive Heat Pumps Portable Power Generation Fuel Reforming Point-of-use Nanomaterial Synthesis Biodiesel Synthesis Lab-on-a-chip Proteomics Single Cell Analysis Cytosensors Kidney Dialysis Biopolymer Synthesis Water Purification Person Portable Cooling Blood Processing At-Home Sensors >> 100 mL/min pL or nL higherlower 25 µm < Channel Height < 250 µm Fluid Volume Application Temperature Channel Dimensions < 100 µm Analytical Microfluidics Arrayed Microfluidics

9 Emerging Industry Fuel Processing Chemical Processing Heating & Cooling Nanomaterial Synthesis Separations life microsystems

10 200 µm wide channels “Number Up” Channels channel header channels Single Lamina Channels –200 µm wide; 100 µm deep –300 µm pitch Lamina ( 24” long x 12” wide ) –~1000 µchannels/lamina –300 µm thickness Patterning: machining (e.g. laser …) forming (e.g. stamping …) micromolding

11 “Number Up” Laminae Laminae (24” long x 12” wide) –~1000 µchannels/lamina –300 µm thickness Device (12” stack) ~ 1000 laminae = 1 x 10 6 reactor µchannels Bonding: diffusion bonding solder paste reflow laser welding … Patterning: machining (e.g. laser …) forming (e.g. stamping …) micromolding 24” 12” 24” Cross-section of Microchannel Array

12 “Number Up” Devices Bonding: diffusion bonding solder paste reflow laser welding … Interconnect welding tapping 24” 12” Microchannel Reactor Bank of Microchannel Reactors (9 x 10 6 microchannels) Device (12” stack) ~ 1000 laminae = 1 x 10 6 reactor µchannels Laminae (24” long x 12” wide) –~1000 µchannels/lamina –300 µm thickness

13 Arrayed Microchannel Manufacturing Fab 3.0 FTE MBI staff currently exists Supply Chain Partners MBI MPT Research Application Development Business Assessment Commerciali- zation Capability Development Processes New devices Biz partner Platforms Business partners Industrial Partners 0.3 FTE ONAMI Extension Director

14 Micreactor-Assisted Nanomanufacturing Greener, Safer, Cheaper Processing of Nanomaterials

15 Oregon Process Innovation Center 3.0 FTE MBI staff currently exists Nanotech Business Partners

16 MBI Buildout Pilot Production Proto- typing Test Current Ph 2 ONAMI $9.5M Facilities 14 labs + 16 offices AMM pilot production Infrastructure Nanomfg Equipment Oregon BEST Novel Process Equip Process Diagnostics

17 Capabilities Design Studio Fab –Shells –Surfaces Characterization Machine Shop Concept Development and Solid Modeling –Solidworks Functional Analysis and Computational Fluid Dynamics –COMSOL (Finite Element) –Fluent (Finite Volume) Manufacturability Analysis and Thermal and Stress Analysis –Abaqus (Finite Element) –Cosmos (Finite Element)

18 Capabilities Design Studio Fab –Shells –Surfaces Characterization Machine Shop Laser micromachining –Deep UV (266 nm) –UV (355 nm) –Green (532 nm) Isotropic etching microEDM Electrochemical etching Electroforming Microembossing Nanoimprinting Injection molding CNC micromilling Ultrasonic machining Courtesy of DOE NETL

19 Capabilities Design Studio Fab –Shells –Surfaces Characterization Machine Shop Diffusion bonding Diffusion brazing Diffusion soldering Solder paste bonding Laser transmission welding Thermal adhesive UV adhesive Pressure-sensitive adhesive Solvent welding Ultrasonic welding Courtesy of DOE NETL

20 Capabilities Design Studio Fab –Shells –Surfaces Characterization Machine Shop Plasma Cleaning/Prep Sputtering Atomic Layer Deposition Microreactor-assisted Nanoparticle Deposition Microreactor-assisted Solution Deposition (Molecular Beam Epitaxy)

21 Capabilities Design Studio Fab –Shells –Surfaces Characterization Machine Shop Laser scanning microscope Contact profiler Optical microscopes at all mags with video/image capture Gas chromatography Liquid chromatography Scanning electron microscope

22 Supplier Interactions Desired interactions –Microforming –Microbrazing –Adhesive bonding Patterning: FeatureProcess Blind cut PCM Drawing of metal foils Roller embossing Through cut Laser cutting Punch/blank Abrasive water jet Bonding: ProcessCapability Diffusion brazingVHP (vendor) Shim coating DTE fixture BrazingBraze dispense Braze foil Screen printing Forming gas oven Reflow oven Humpback furnace Soldering Adhesive bondingAdhesive dispense Screen printing Laser welding Ultrasonic welding Spark plasma bonding Current Vendor Engagement Vendor Engagement Needed

23 Industry Partnership Market Development Technology Development Technology Partners Large companies Technology “off-the-shelf” Equipment, methods, platform technology product licenses Supply Chain Partners Existing companies Small & medium sized Leverages capabilities Process Development apps process licenses, manufacturability research needs Business Partners Entrepreneurs Marketeers Existing businesses product designs Microproducts Breakthrough Institute

24 Industrial Outreach Monday, September 21,2009 Tentative Agenda 1:00 – 1:10 Welcome and Introduction to the Workshop Kevin Drost, OSU, MBI 1:10 – 1:30 Significance of Microchannel Process Technology Kevin Drost, OSU, MBI 1:30 - 1:50 Advantages of MPT Solutions Goran Jovanovic, OSU, MBI 1:50 - 2:15 Arrayed Microchannel Manufacturing Brian Paul, OSU, MBI 2:15 – 2:30 The MBI Alliance: Industry, National Labs and OSU Dan Palo, PNNL, MBI 2:30 – 2:40 MPT Opportunities Goran Jovanovic, OSU, MBI 2:40 – 3:00Break 3:00 – 3:20 Opportunity 1 – Microchannel Energy Applications Richard Peterson, OSU, MBI 3:20 – 3:40 Opportunity 2 – Building Technologies Ward TeGrotenhuis, PNNL, MBI 3:40 – 4:00 Opportunity 3 – Polysilicon Production Goran Jovanovic, OSU, MBI 3:40 – 4:00 Opportunity 4 – Sustainable Nanomanufacturing Brian Paul, OSU, MBI 4:20 – 4:30 How Do You Connect to MBI and Transfer Technologies? Brian Wall, OSU Technology Transfer 4:30 – 5:00Open Forum


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