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Griffith University School of Psychology Mt Gravatt campus First Year Orientation Program 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "Griffith University School of Psychology Mt Gravatt campus First Year Orientation Program 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Griffith University School of Psychology Mt Gravatt campus First Year Orientation Program 2012

2 Welcome to/Acknowledgment of Country In the Spirit of Reconciliation Following on from Sorry Day And consistent with the Griffith University Statement on Reconciliation (May 2007) “In the spirit of cooperation, partnership & mutual respect, Griffith walks with Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people, the First Peoples, along a path of inclusion, equality & understanding for the betterment of all Australians in the name of reconciliation.” We acknowledge & honour the Traditional Custodians of this land that our Mt Gravatt campus is built on, & pay respect to their Elders past & present.

3 Who are our Traditional Custodians we are paying respect to? Our Brisbane campuses are situated on the lands of the Yuggera the Yugarabul the Jagera and the Turrbal Peoples

4 Orientation Program Overview 9: : Welcome Success in First Year Questions and Answers : Campus Tours :Free BBQ lunch in Undercroft 1.15 – 1.30:Getting Started in Psychology 1.30 – 2.00:Getting Online : Questions & Answers : Enrolment & Timetabling Advice

5 The Purpose of our Orientation Program The primary purpose of our Orientation Day is to assist in facilitating your successful transition to Griffith University & to your School/Program All commencing professionals-in-training undergo a transition process & our job is to assist you to be successful in making that transition? We have a Griffith model which describes that transition process called the 5 Senses of Student Success & we will be working our way through the senses today.

6 Understanding Student Transition: The ‘Five-Senses’ of Student Success (Lizzio, 2006) Sense of Student Identity Sense of Connectedness Sense of Capability Sense of Purpose Sense of Resourcefulness

7 Facilitating Student Transition We will start by building Sense of Connectedness with Key Staff and Your Peers

8 Sense of Connectedness (Lizzio, 2006) Sense of Student Identity Sense of Connectedness Sense of Capability Sense of Purpose Sense of Resourcefulness

9 School Welcome Head of School Alf Lizzio Deputy Head of School Liz Jones Undergraduate Program Convenor Mark Chappell First Semester First Year Course Convenors Tim Cutmore, Angela Morgan First Year Tutors Angela, Emily, Sam, Govind, Salih Karla, Bianca, Georgie, Sarah First Year Coordinator Amy Hawkes Student Success Advisor Rebecca Eaton School Mentoring Coordinator Sally Chester-Law Peer Mentors First Year Professionals-in-training First Year Professionals-in-training Parents, Friends…….

10 School Welcome! A Big Welcome to all of you! Our incoming first year cohort of professionals- in-training

11 Professionals-in-training Welcome Turn to the person beside you & have a quick chat (1 minute) What is your name? What attracted you to studying in the discipline of psychology? What do you hope to get out of today’s Orientation Program?

12 Who are our commencing Professionals- in-training & your colleagues? 446 commencing students (approx) 80% women, 20% men 20% mature age, 80% high school leavers 65% the first in your family to attend uni 2 Indigenous students 6 International students (China, India, Oman, Indonesia, Norway/Sweden) Refugees & immigrants with English as a second language (Africa, Bosnia, Latin America)

13 What are you studying? All 446 of you are studying psychology – 173 Bachelor of Psychological Science 121 Bachelor of Psychology 91 B Psych + Criminology/Criminal Justice 18 B Psych + Law 43 B Psych + Business

14 Sense of Capability (Lizzio, 2006) Sense of Student Identity Sense of Connectedness Sense of Capability Sense of Purpose Sense of Resourcefulness

15 Sense of Capability What factors contribute to the success or failure of commencing professionals- in-training in their first semester of study?

16 Something important to think about…… Why do you think some commencing PITs might succeed at university while others might fail or give up? Chat to the person next to you for 1 minute.

17 What do we know from research about success in first year? Students are more likely to succeed if they: Invest time on task  time spent studying each week is the strongest predictor Regularly attend lectures & tutorials  increased learning opportunities also a strong predictor Develop a social network at uni  knowing one person’s name is a protective factor against dropping out Have a clear goal or purpose for attending uni (sense of vocational direction & purpose especially)  a strong predictor of success & protects against dropping-out Engage with the online environment  moderates success at university Balance commitments (working on average not more than 15 hours a week in paid employment)  making appropriate time for study predicts success Have some sense of academic self-confidence  predicts success (self-efficacy & an expectation of success is foundational to success in life)

18 What do we know from research about risk factors in first year? Students are more likely to drop-out or fail if they: Don’t spend enough time outside of class to study each week Don’t regularly attend lectures & tutorials Don’t develop a social network at university Don’t have a sense of purpose (esp vocational purpose) in their degree Don’t have access to or engage with the online environment Do work more than 25 hours per week while studying full time

19 Our own Griffith research with our FY students shows……. You may have lower marks in your First Semester of First Year if - You are the first member of your family (FIF) to attend university Being first-in-family, means being the Pathfinder & Trailblazer for your family, & possibly your community/social group (a social justice issue about access to university)

20 Success in First Year! Question Why are FIF students likely to have lower marks in their first semester? Have a think and a chat to the person beside you

21 Success in First Year! The reason for this is because you probably won’t have the “academic capital” to allow you to “hit the ground running” in your first semester It takes time to understand what is required of you - in your new role as a university student & practitioner-in-training in psychology as a self-managing or independent learner who will be structuring your own time as a professional-in-training in your discipline – academic standards at uni are different & harder compared to those at high school!

22 The Good News is that national research evidence shows…. Despite low access rates, the success rate (or tendency to pass their year’s subjects) of First-in-Family students (including those from a low socio-economic background) is 97% of the pass rates of second generation students & those from a medium to high socio- economic background & has been stable over the last 9 years. (Bradley et al, 2008:30) Which means YOU CAN DO THIS! This success rate is, however, premised on your coming to class each week, studying each week, & participating in a range of support systems (e.g., Academic Support Workshops, peer mentoring, study groups, PASS, Learning & Counselling services support etc.) offered by the School & the University to build your academic capital more quickly

23 Success in First Year! Thus, failure or lower performance on assessment items in your first semester or first year simply means that you do yet understand the standard of work required for success in your discipline of study, or are not putting sufficient time into your study Failure does NOT MEAN that you are not smart enough, and the data on first year performance throughout Australia confirms that you are all smart enough to get your degree!

24 What do we know about the profile of our Griffith Students? Compared to other Australian universities our students: Work longer hours in paid employment  you will need to monitor your work-study balance to create the conditions for your success Are more likely to be the ‘”first in their family’’ (FIF) to attend University * Psychology Mt Gravatt = 70% approx  you will need to pick up the supports we are offering in your Transition Program Griffith has the 3 rd highest Indigenous student intake Griffith has the 6 th highest intake of students from low socio- economic or disadvantaged backgrounds (a strong social justice agenda)

25 Sense of Purpose (Lizzio, 2006) Sense of Student Identity Sense of Connectedness Sense of Capability Sense of Purpose Sense of Resourcefulness

26 What do we know about the benefits of having a uni degree? We know that a degree will TRANSFORM YOUR LIFE for the BETTER & FOREVER! Social standing & status Economic – income, housing, holidays Health – live longer, lower incidence of major illness, lower incidence of high risk drinking practices in young men

27 The myth of entry OP! OP is about getting in…….ENTRY OP is not about getting on…..SUCCESS OP has a relationship with high results (HDs & Ds) in first year courses in psychology, BUT OP has no relationship with PASSES, CREDITS or FAILS in first year Psychology OP has no relationship to GRADUATING with your degree OP has no relationship to SUCCESS as a Practitioner OP does not necessarily equal ability - many smart people have low OPs TIME & EFFORT invested is the KEY to SUCCESS So forget your OP & focus on your GPA The fact that you have been accepted into this course means YOU ARE CAPABLE OF FINISHING YOUR DEGREE!

28 Remember! What’s important is WHERE AM I GOING, not where have I come from!

29 Sense of Resourcefulness (Lizzio, 2006) Sense of Student Identity Sense of Connectedness Sense of Capability Sense of Purpose Sense of Resourcefulness

30 Sense of Resourcefulness What are we doing in the School of Psychology to support your success?

31 What is the GU framework for student engagement & success? Source: Lizzio (2006) The Five Senses of Success Sense of Student Identity Sense of Connection Sense of Capability Sense of Resourcefulness Sense of Purpose

32 What are new students’ needs and concerns? Sense of Connection Meeting people and making friends Establishing positive working relationships with staff Having a sense of valued identity and belonging Sense of Purpose Affirming your vocational direction and motivation Appreciating the links between your degree and future career Understanding the structure & rationale of degree program Sense of Capability Clarifying expectations of the uni student role Building confidence for academic challenges Establishing an organised and strategic approach to study Sense of Resourcefulness Learning how to navigate the system Knowing where to get help Managing study-work-life balance

33 What is your School doing to support you to be successful? Sense of Connection Orientation Program - Meeting your FY staff & being welcomed into your School today Student Success Advisor Peer Mentoring Program Lunch time barbeque to meet folks Undergraduate Student Council Sense of Purpose Peer Mentoring - Your Peer Mentors will affirm your vocational direction & help you to understand the structure & rationale of your degree program Academic Success Program * Making Careers Happen Workshop - appreciating the links between your degree & your future career * Workplace Employment Program – volunteering Sense of Capability Peer Mentoring Program - Clarifying new expectations of the uni student role Academic Success Program - Building skills & confidence for academic challenges including assessment generally & in 1001 & 1008 Establishing an organised and strategic approach to study Sense of Resourcefulness Peer Mentoring Orientation Program – getting online ASP Program Student Success Advisors Library/Info Services

34 Reflection Chat to the person next to you How do the success factors relate to me? What support activities/interventions will I get involved in to assist my success?

35 STUDENT SUCCESS ADVISOR Rebecca Eaton Ph 3735 xxxx Consultation Hours – Mondays & M24 (Psychology Building) - Room 3.20

36 STUDENT SUCCESS ADVISOR ROLE Rebecca Eaton Assist you to make a successful transition to university study by : 1. Designing & Implementing academic skills programs e.g., ASP (Academic Success Program) (develops study skills, career direction, support) PEER MATES (Peer Mentoring Program) (develops social connection & academic support) LAMP (Learning About My Profession) (develops career direction & vocational purpose) JUST-IN-TIME Interventions (develops academic skills in different types of assessment)

37 STUDENT SUCCESS ADVISOR ROLE Rebecca Eaton Assist you to make a successful transition to university study BY : 2. Being available for individual & group consultation about Academic progress Learning needs & access to relevant resources Assessment tasks & requirements Personal issues or difficulties interfering with your study Anything………. 3. Monitoring your progress & contacting you at various points to assist your success & offer targeted support contact Phone contact Face-to-face contact one-on-one & in small groups

38 Sense of Connectedness (Lizzio, 2006) Sense of Student Identity Sense of Connectedness Sense of Capability Sense of Purpose Sense of Resourcefulness

39 So how might peer mentoring contribute to my success? Sense of Connectedness

40 Peer mentors contribute to success ‘right across the board’ Mentoring helps to develop all Five Senses of Success Sense of Academic Culture Sense of Connection Sense of Capability Sense of Resourcefulness Sense of Purpose PMP

41 What is the evidence for the benefits of Peer Mentoring? Commencing students who participate in a well-run peer mentoring program are more likely to report: * Greater social and relationship adjustment * Greater academic adjustment and efficacy * More collaboration and less competitiveness * And achieve significantly higher GPAs for both semesters 1 & 2 Source: Randomised control trial, School of Psychology (1996)

42 What is the School trying to achieve with peer mentoring? We are hoping that Peer Mentors will act as an ‘agent of change’ by helping you as commencing students : Student Retention Make a successful transition to university and to your School community Academic Success Become capable and effective learners Social Change Transform your lives by successfully completing their first year of study Continuing Leadership Through your participation you will consider being peer mentors to future cohorts

43 What can peer mentors do? Develop supportive relationships Help Solve Problems Actively manage the process Facilitate Aspirations Your Peer Mentors will give some examples

44 How will I be matched with my mentees? Effective matching using shared interest criteria (e.g., gender, age, degree type, cultural differences) where possible. The matching process will be organised by your PM Coordinator - Sally Chester-Law Sally will provide your Mentor with your names & contact info Mentors & Mentees will be matched in 3 waves – Orientation Day, Week1, Week 2

45 If you want to participate in our Peer Mentoring Program then…. Fill out the blue form & hand it to your SSA Rebecca at the end of this session or at the end of the day.

46 Diversity… People are similar & different! We are all the same, because we’re all different! What types of diversity might you encounter amongst your student colleagues? Gender – approx 80% women, 20% men Age – approx 80% high school leavers, 20% mature age Sexual orientation Cultural background Disability (physical or psychological) Dress Other

47 Cultural diversity What types of cultural diversity might you encounter amongst your student colleagues? Indigenous/First Nation Australians International (e.g., South-East Asia, India, Middle-East, Africa, Europe) Immigrants or Refugees with English as a second language (ESL) (e.g., Bosnia, Serbia, Africa, Afghanistan, Iraq, Africa) Second generation Australians Third/Fourth generation Australians All sorts

48 Some key questions about difference What are the issues faced by commencing colleagues from these differing cultural backgrounds? What are the opportunities and benefits that these colleagues bring? What success structures does Griffith have in place to assist these colleagues? (see Handouts for Referral) What attitudes and strategies can all of us use to best relate to and support each other?

49 Indigenous Students If you are an Indigenous student, you may wish to contact the GUMURRII Student Support Centre on Mt Gravatt campus – M10 level 1 at the end of the corridor. Gumurrii Coordinator Mt Gravatt Deann Grant –

50 International students If you are an International student, you need to contact your International Advisor for Psychology – Liz Wright or Jane Sefton If you are a student with English as a Second Language (ESL), it may be useful to get assistance with your English language skills. When in doubt, contact our International Advisors also (see above).

51 How do I get assistance with my English language… If you are an Australian student with English as a second language (ESL or LOTE), it may be useful to get assistance with your English language skills. 1.English Help with language * for Group help * for individual help phone & make an appointment 2. Language classes – phone Rod Gardner on There is a nominal cost of about $20

52 Sense of Capability (Lizzio, 2006) Sense of Student Identity Sense of Connectedness Sense of Capability Sense of Purpose Sense of Resourcefulness

53 What Electives should I be doing? Choice of electives - We have provided you with a list of common electives, but you can do electives that are not on this list. In semester 1 you can do 2 free electives from any School within Griffith Choose 1 st year electives - you will need to choose 1 st year electives only (the first number indicates the year of study e.g., 1005CCJ = a 1 st year elective whereas 2001CCJ = a 2 nd year elective & so on). Pre-requisites - 1 st year electives do not have any pre-requisites for study.

54 Sense of Capability What is expected of me in lectures & tutorials – how should I behave?

55 What is a Lecture? The structured delivery of information (theories & concepts) around a specific topic 1001 Introductory Cognitive & Behavioural Psychology – 2 hour lectures each week x 13 weeks (Wednesdays Nathan campus – get the campus bus) 1008 Interpersonal Skills – 1 hour lecture each week x 13 weeks (Monday 2.00 Mt Gravatt campus)

56 Code of conduct in lectures The 6 As Attendance - turn up each week Attention – * listen & don’t talk to others during the lecture – manage yourself & be respectful to your colleagues & to staff * don’t walk out in the middle of a lecture - respect Active note-taking = maximising learning Ask questions if you don’t understand Axe your mobile phone Authority issues left outside the door – self- management

57 What is a Tutorial? Groups of about 25 students meet weekly with a dedicated tutor for the semester to provide a forum for discussion and application of the lecture material Tutes start in Week 2 & can take 3 forms – 1.Tutorial – discussion groups guided by a tutor 2.Laboratory class – 1001 conducting & analysing experiments on material related to the lectures (1 hour x 12 weeks) 3.Workshop interpersonal skills practice & development (2 hours x 8 weeks)

58 Code of conduct in tutorials The 7 As Attendance - turn up each week to classes Attention - listen to your tutor & don’t talk while they’re talking - being respectful Active participation – speak up in discussions Ask other people what they think Ask any & all questions if you don’t understand Axe your mobile phone Authority issues – leave any unresolved issues with people in authority outside of the door – self-control and self-management = maturity in the university student/professional-in-training role

59 How much time will I need to study? 10 credit points of study = 10 hours of study per week for each course 10 hours of study per week = * 3 hours of class contact (lectures & tutes) * 7 hours of study time Studying full time = 40 hours per week for class contact & study Studying part time = hours per week

60 Time management reflection task How much time do I have to study? Please write down how many hours you spend a week: Working? Sleeping? Eating? Travelling? Socialising? Caring for family? Watching television? Playing computer games? Chatting on MSN? Household chores? (You may want to break this down into shopping, cooking, cleaning) Any other time commitments that are not included? There are 168 hours per week. How many hours do you have left over to study?

61 What are useful activities should I be considering to facilitate my success? Forming study groups Mapping out my assessment schedule (including preparation/enabling activities) Undertaking independent learning activities (e.g., visiting the New Students website and undertake the self-assessment tasks; attending learning workshops). Experimenting with peer assessment/feedback before submitting your work Reading more widely and critically than I have previously

62 The point of no return…… HECS Census date…. when the govt decides you owe them $ for being a student is April 6 th So…if you think it’s a mistake to be here or that “you can’t be bothered”, then to save yourself a lot of $, formally withdraw your enrolment before the 6 th April You can do this by getting in online & cancelling your enrolment Be very clear that WE WANT YOU TO STAY in OUR SCHOOL & to be successful…we are simply trying to do the right thing by you.

63 Remember….. Academic Success depends on understanding what is required for an assessment item – e.g., in disciplines there are specific formats for presenting work (e.g., essays & lab reports)  attend & pay attention in tutes & lectures  discuss with your Peer Mentors  don’t interpret a lack of success in your own eyes as “not being smart enough”, ‘cos it’s NOT TRUE’  it simply means you need to be PERSISTENT to find out what is required & DO IT!

64 TO CONTACT STUDENT SUCCESS ADVISOR Rebecca Eaton Ph 3735 xxxx Consultation Hours – Mondays & M24 (Psychology Building) - Room 3.20

65 Finally…. We value the contribution you are about to make in our School. We regard you as our partners in this learning process. We will support you to be successful at University! We hope you will both learn from and enjoy the experience!


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