Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

It’s Vocab Time!. Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4 Abscond (v.) to run off and hide.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "It’s Vocab Time!. Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4 Abscond (v.) to run off and hide."— Presentation transcript:

1 It’s Vocab Time!

2 Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4 Abscond (v.) to run off and hide

3 Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4 Abscond –L. abscondere "to hide, conceal," from ab(s)- "away" + condere "put together, store," from com- "together" + dere "put," from PIE *dhe- "to put, place, make"

4 The man absconded with the lady’s purse as she stood crying. Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

5 Access (n.) approach or admittance to places, persons, things; an increase (v.) to get at, obtain Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

6 Access – O.Fr. acces "onslaught," from L. accessus "a coming to, an approach," pp. of accedere "approach" Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

7 Before a date, you should access your money from the ATM. Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

8 Anarchy (n.) a lack of government and law; confusion Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

9 Anarchy –M.L. anarchia, from Gk. anarkhia "lack of a leader," noun of state from anarkhos "rulerless," from an- "without" + arkhos "leader." Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

10 Teenagers often try to act rebellious by drawing anarchy symbols. Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

11 Arduous (adj.) hard to do, requiring much effort Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

12 Arduous – L. arduus "high, steep," from PIE base *eredh- "to grow, high" (cf. O.Ir. ard "high"). Metaphoric extension to "difficult" first attested Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

13 After an arduous process of determining the winner, Jaslene Gonzalez was selected as the first Latina winner of America’s Next Top Model. Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

14 Auspicious (adj.) favorable; fortunate Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

15 Auspicious – from L. auspicium "divination by observing the flight of birds," from auspex (gen. auspicis) "augur," lit. "one who takes signs from the flight of birds," from PIE *awi-spek- "observer of birds," from *awi- "bird" + *spek- "to see." Connection between birds and omens also is in Gk. oionos "bird of prey, bird of omen, omen," and ornis "bird," which also could mean "omen." Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

16 Powerball jackpot winners have auspicious luck, especially this man who won $314,900, Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

17 Don’t forget your words!

18 It’s Vocab Time

19 Biased (adj.) favoring one side unduly; prejudiced Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

20 Biased – from M.Fr. biasis "slant, oblique," from O.Prov. biais, possibly from V.L. *(e)bigassius, from Gk. epikarsios "slanting, oblique," from epi- "upon" + karsios "oblique." Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

21 Ku Klux Klan members are biased against all races other than Caucasians. Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

22 Daunt (v.) to overcome with fear, intimidate; to dishearten, discourage Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

23 Daunt – O.Fr. danter, var. of donter, from L. domitare, freq. of domare "to tame" Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

24 It is easy to feel daunted by others who are taller than yourself. Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

25 Disentangle (v.) to free from tangles or complications Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

26 Disentangle – “dis” O.Fr. des-, from L. dis- "apart," from PIE *dis- "apart, asunder" + “tangle” from a Scand. source (cf. dialectal Swed. taggla "to disorder," O.N. þongull "seaweed"). Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

27 Disentangling holiday lights is a daunting task. Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

28 Fated (adj.) determined in advance by destiny or fortune Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

29 Fated – from L. fata, neut. pl. of fatum "thing spoken (by the gods), one's destiny," from neut. pp. of fari "to speak," from PIE *bha- “speak” Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

30 Some people believe fortune tellers can predict your future based on your fate line on the palm of your hand. Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

31 Hoodwink (v.) to mislead by a trick, deceive Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

32 Hoodwink – “hood” O.E. hod, from P.Gmc. *khodaz (cf. O.Fris. hod, M.Du. hoet, Ger. Hut "hat," O.Fris. hode "guard, protection"), from PIE *kadh- "cover" + “wink” O.E. wincian "to nod, wink," from P.Gmc. *wenkanan (cf. Du. wenken, O.H.G. winkan, Ger. winken), a gradational variant of the root of O.H.G. wankon "to stagger, totter," O.N. vakka "to stray, hover," from PIE *weng- "to bend, curve." Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

33 Is Criss Angel hoodwinking his audience or can he really levitate? Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

34 Don’t forget your words! More coming tomorrow...

35 It’s Vocab Time!

36 Inanimate (adj.) not having life; without energy or spirit Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

37 Inanimate – M.E., from L.L. inanimatus, from L. in- + animatus, pp. of animare to animate Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

38 Art classes often have students paint inanimate objects such as fruit.

39 Incinerate (v.) to burn to ashes Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

40 Incinerate – M.L. incineratus "reduce to ashes," pp. of incinerare, from L. in- "into" + cinis (gen. cineris) “ashes.” Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

41 Many people choose to be cremated in an incinerator when they die.

42 Intrepid (adj.) very brave, fearless, unshakable Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

43 Intrepid – Latin intrepidus, from in- + trepidus alarmed Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

44 The intrepid kitten walked past the row of German Shepard dogs.

45 Larceny (n.) theft Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

46 Larceny – Anglo-Fr. larcin (1292), from O.Fr. larrecin "theft," from L. latrocinium "robbery," from latro (gen. latronis) "robber, bandit," also "hireling, mercenary," ult. from Gk. latron “pay, hire, wages.” Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

47 OJ Simpson was charged with larceny in Las Vegas for allegedly stealing autographed memorabilia.

48 Pliant (adj.) bending readily; easily influenced Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

49 Pliant – O.Fr. pliant "bending" (13c.), prp. of plier "to bend" Fig. sense of "easily influenced" is from c Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

50 Contortionists have pliant bodies.

51 Don’t forget your words!

52 It’s Vocab Time!

53 Pompous (adj.) overly self- important in speech and manner; excessively stately or ceremonious Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

54 Pompous – O.Fr. pompe (13c.), from L. pompa "procession, pomp," from Gk. pompe "solemn procession, display," lit. "a sending," from pempein "to send." In Church L., used in depreciatory sense for “worldly display, vain show.” Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

55 Weddings have become pompous ceremonies where couples are more concerned with impressing their guests than the life-long commitment they are making to each other.

56 Precipice (n.) a very steep cliff; the brink or edge of disaster Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

57 Precipice – Fr. précipice, from L. præcipitium "a steep place," lit. "a fall or leap," from præceps (gen. præcipitis) "steep, headlong, headfirst," from præ- "forth" + caput “head” Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

58 The Grand Canyon has many precipices where tourists could accidentally slip to their death.

59 Rectify (v.) to make right, correct Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

60 Rectify – O.Fr. rectifier, lit. "to make straight" (14c.), from L.L. rectificare "make right" (3c.), from L. rectus "straight" + root of facere “to make” Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

61 Architects are trying to rectify the foundation problems that cause the Tower of Pisa to lean.

62 Reprieve (n.) a temporary relief or delay (v.) to grant a postponement Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

63 Reprieve –M.E. repryen "to remand, detain" (1494), probably from M.Fr. repris, pp. of reprendre “take back” Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

64 Having a spa treatment is a nice reprieve from everyday life.

65 Revile (v.) to attack with words, call bad names Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

66 Revile – M.E, from M.Fr. reviler "to despise," from re- + vil from Anglo-Fr. and O.Fr. vile, from L. vilis "cheap, worthless, base, common," of unknown origin. Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4

67 Adherents to political parties often revile certain talk show hosts because of their political opinions.

68 Don’t forget your words!


Download ppt "It’s Vocab Time!. Vocabulary Workshop, Level D Etymologies: Unit 4 Abscond (v.) to run off and hide."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google