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Finding an Academic Job Junying Yuan Women in Cell Biology ASCB.

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Presentation on theme: "Finding an Academic Job Junying Yuan Women in Cell Biology ASCB."— Presentation transcript:

1 Finding an Academic Job Junying Yuan Women in Cell Biology ASCB

2 The Timing Samara Reck-Peterson Assistant Professor Department of Cell Biology Harvard Medical School

3 THE JOB SEARCH CALENDAR FINDING A JOB JULY: Start putting your application package together AUG: Finalize application, job ads begin appearing SEPT: Lots of ads appear OCT: Earliest deadlines NOV: Many deadlines DEC: Many deadlines, interview invitations begin JAN: Interview invitations, interviews begin FEB: Interviews continue MARCH: Interviews continue, 2nd visits APRIL: 2nd visits and negotiations MAY: 2nd visits and negotiations JUNE: Job!

4 FINDING A JOB WHEN AM I READY TO APPLY?

5 One great paper or several good papers. You need a story. The more unique and ground breaking the higher you can aim. You should have spent considerable time thinking about new directions and ideally begun some pilot experiments. Identify new collaborators. Trust your gut. If you start to have more ideas than you have time to implement, you are ready. Pay attention to feedback. People should start asking you at meetings- “Are you looking for a job?” Due to the financial crisis: talk to your PI about staying longer, use this time to start a new pilot project that will help make you stand out.

6 FINDING A JOB HOW DO I FIND OUT ABOUT JOBS? http://www.nature.com/naturejobs/index.html http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org/

7 FINDING A JOB HOW MANY JOBS SHOULD I APPLY FOR? Rose Goodchild Assistant Professor University of Tennessee at Knoxville

8 The Logistics Stephanie K. Eberle School of Medicine Career Center Stanford University

9 Agenda CVs, Cover letter, personal/research statement and teaching portfolio sections Helpful cover letter, research statement and teaching portfolio hints Tips on soliciting references Anything else?

10 Agenda CVs, Cover letter, personal/research statement and teaching portfolio sections Helpful cover letter, research statement and teaching portfolio hints Tips on soliciting references Anything else?

11 The Academic Job Application Consists of: CV (curriculum vitae) Cover letter/statement of purpose/statement of interest Teaching statement/portfolio and/or research statement Reference letters Writing samples

12 The Curriculum Vitae

13 CVs and Resumes: What is the Difference? Jobs for which they are submitted Focus Length Reading Time Primary Sections

14 Sections of a Vita Required Contact Information Education Dissertation Fellowships/Awards Research Experience Teaching Experience Publications/ Presentations Optional Academic/Community Service Related Professional Experience Languages Research/Teaching Interests Works in Progress References

15 Tailoring Your CV Your CV Should Can Be Tailored According To: Focus School Position Specialization

16 Remember: Font size matters Highlight sections sparingly Follow conventions of your field Avoid acronyms Have others proofread your work Use professional paper and print

17 Cover Letters

18 Cover Letters and Personal Statements Cover Letters Highlights relevant points/skills Provides a brief introduction to your CV and teaching portfolio Limited to 1-2 pages (depending on field and type of letter) Personal Statements Focus on “who” you are as opposed to basic skills No standard page limit Make sure you answer the question!

19 Sections of the Cover Letter Contact Information Date Addressee/Address Salutation: To a specific person, if possible First Paragraph: Introduction Second/Third Paragraph: How you are qualified Final Paragraph: Closure Sincerely,

20 Helpful Hints: Use departmental letterhead (if possible) Proofread Pay attention to transition in letter Take credit for accomplishments Use “active voice”

21 Common Mistakes to Avoid: Not taking the letter/statement seriously Submitting a “generic” statement or letter Trying to guess what the committee wants to hear Being too personal Repeating only what is on the CV Not answering the question

22 Research and Teaching Documents

23 Research Statements Gives an overview of your research (past, current, and future) Discusses relevance to department and university Typically kept at 2 pages Specificity varies

24 Characteristics of a Teaching Portfolio Comprehensive presentation of your teaching skills, goals, and accomplishments Individualized Supported by empirical evidence

25 Possible Inclusions: Your Thoughts About Teaching Your teaching philosophy What teaching means to you Teaching Plans - research combined with teaching - teaching focus at a small school

26 Possible Inclusions: Teaching Documentation Include: Course information Your role in teaching Brief overview of your responsibilities Brief overview of the function you served Attach: Syllabi Handouts/other materials Special teaching aids used

27 Possible Inclusions: Teaching Effectiveness Include: Evaluations of teaching Teaching dilemmas/outcomes Evidence of teaching development Attach: Videotapes of you teaching Original evaluation forms or summaries Examples of student writing and your feedback

28 Possible Inclusions: Contributions to the Teaching Profession Consultation projects Development of teaching materials Works submitted for publication or presentation

29 Possible Inclusions: Honors and Awards Letters given to you mentioning your teaching skills Formal awards Outside invitations to teach or contribute

30 Tips for Developing Your Portfolio: Start compiling samples for your portfolio early Select items which you deem to be the best examples of your work The format may vary, depending on intended use

31 Recommendations and Resources

32 Tips on Soliciting Recommendations Know what the reference entails Give referees enough time to compose something thoughtful Ask them if they can provide a “positive” reference Provide supporting information Send thank you letters afterward

33 Helpful Resources http://www.chronicle.com http://www.ujobbank.com http://www.ccweek.com http://med.stanford.edu/careercenter/

34 The Interview Alan Hall Chair, Cell Biology Program Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

35 Applying for Academic Positions at a Primarily Undergraduate Teaching Institution Laurie Cook Assistant Professor State University of New York College at Brockport

36 Applying for Academic Positions at a Primarily Undergraduate Teaching Institution Cover Letter Tips –Identify with the college. –Explain red flags. –How do you fit the job description? CV –Teaching/mentoring experience, including undergraduates and their successes –Has your research been published? Have you experience writing grants? Teaching Philosophy –Two pages single-spaced is sufficient. –Should include information on teaching style, assessment strategies, inclusion of technology, etc. Research Statement –Address constraints (BSL-1 versus BSL-2?). –Are the projects amenable to undergraduates? –Will it be fundable?

37 Interviewing for Academic Positions at a Primarily Undergraduate Teaching Institution Phone Interviews of 8-10 candidates are used to narrow down the 4-5 people we bring to campus Meet one-on-one with Department Chair –Ask questions regarding faculty expectations, tenure requirements, teaching load, support, etc. Meet with other faculty –Depending upon stage of career, your questions should change –Get a sense for faculty collegiality, stresses Teaching seminar –20-40 minute time slot in an existing course. Usually on a topic of your choice. –Engage the students! Lunch with Students –Potential research students; learn more about curriculum; student satisfaction Research Seminar –45-50 minutes with both students and faculty present –Know your audience and pitch it at their level –Focus on projects related to what you might do if hired. Round Table Discussion –Can you get the questions ahead of time? –Your chance to discuss what you might teach and how –Further explanation of research requirements and plans Dinner with Faculty –Informal meeting to ask questions about housing, child care, etc

38 How to deal with Daniela Nicastro Assistant Professor Department of Biology Brandeis University

39 Red flags in your application package and suggestions about how to deal with them CategoryTypeSuggestions 1Publication record low number (especially 1 st author)  Add a “current projects summary” (rather than just “manuscripts in preparation”  Networking/talks to showcase your work  Advisor should explain in his reference letter reason(s) and what is in preparation large gap(s)  Advisor letter explains reason(s) in his reference letter retracted paper  Advisor letter should explain situation and give it a positive spin (unforeseeable, handled situation well..)

40 Red flags in your application package and suggestions about how to deal with them CategoryTypeSuggestions 1Publication record low number (especially 1 st author)  Add a “current projects summary” (rather than just “manuscripts in preparation”  Networking/talks to showcase your work  Advisor should explain in his reference letter reason(s) and what is in preparation large gap(s)  Advisor letter explains reason(s) in his reference letter retracted paper  Advisor letter should explain situation and give it a positive spin (unforeseeable, handled situation well..)

41 Red flags in your application package and suggestions about how to deal with them 2Advisor(s)rather long time in one lab (“long” depends on field => ask around to find out)  Your statement/advisor letter should explain situation (e.g. had to pioneer a technique before getting results) rather short time(s) in a lab  Your statement/advisor letter should explain situation (e.g. lost funding …)  Find a way to make up for missing proof of “independence” (e.g. applications for fellowships/funding, or so; what did you learn…)  Base your research statement on work with good track record (e.g. graduate work instead of postdoc) only one advisor (grad+postdoc)  Your statement/advisor letter should explain situation (e.g. personal reasons –> was bound to a certain location...) negative or missing reference letter of your advisor(s)  Other advisor/collaborator/provider of letter that is familiar with the situation could explain it and give it a positive spin  Networking to showcase you and your work  During an interview you can explain the situation – be open but avoid negativity and negative comments

42 Red flags in your application package and suggestions about how to deal with them 2Advisor(s)rather long time in one lab (“long” depends on field => ask around to find out)  Your statement/advisor letter should explain situation (e.g. had to pioneer a technique before getting results, hard project, …) rather short time(s) in a lab  Your statement/advisor letter should explain situation (e.g. lost funding …)  Base your research statement on work with good track record (e.g. graduate work instead of postdoc)  Find a way to make up for missing proof of “independence” (e.g. applications for fellowships/funding, or so; what did you learn…) only one advisor (grad+postdoc)  Your statement/advisor letter should explain situation (e.g. personal reasons –> was bound to a certain location...) negative or missing reference letter of your advisor(s)  Other advisor/collaborator that is familiar with the situation could explain it in his letter and maybe give it even a positive spin  Networking to showcase you and your work  During an interview you can explain the situation – be open, BUT avoid negativity and negative comments

43 Red flags in your application package and suggestions about how to deal with them 3Proposed Research is “unfundable” (“who cares”)  Emphasize in your research statement the big picture and significance of your proposed research  Maybe mention to what agencies you plan to apply for funding straight forward research in a highly competitive field (“big shot labs” as competitors)  Emphasis the unique angle/innovative approach you propose to use very close to your advisor’s research  Distinguish your research from your advisor’s  Advisor letter could explain that you take the project with you and that he/she will not further pursue this research direction too close or too far from the department you are applying to  Do your homework and look inform yourself about the department you are applying to  [Customize your research statement for the department you are applying to – lot of work!] will require very expensive equipment, not present yet  Have alternative plan for what other facilities you can use (national resources …)  Note that you are prepared to apply for funding

44 Red flags in your application package and suggestions about how to deal with them 3Proposed Research is “unfundable” (“who cares”)  Emphasize in your research statement the big picture and significance of your proposed research  Maybe mention to what agencies you plan to apply for funding straight forward research in a highly competitive field (“big shot labs” as competitors)  Emphasize the unique angle/innovative approach you propose to use very close to your advisor’s research  Distinguish your research from your advisor’s  Advisor letter could explain that you take the project with you and that he/she will not further pursue this research direction too close or too far from the department you are applying to  Do your homework and inform yourself about the department you are applying to  [Customize your research statement for the department you are applying to – a lot of work!] will require very expensive equipment, not present yet  Have alternative plan for what other facilities you can use (national resources …)  Maybe mention that you will apply for funding

45 Red flags in your application package and suggestions about how to deal with them 4Teachingno experience  Get experience (e.g. ask your PI to teach a class)  If impossible, then explain the situation and write a good teaching statement where you include your enthusiasm to teach

46 Red flags in your application package and suggestions about how to deal with them 4Teachingno experience  Get experience (e.g. ask your PI to teach a class)  If impossible, then explain the situation and write a good teaching statement where you include your enthusiasm to teach

47 Red flags in your application package and suggestions about how to deal with them 4Teachingno experience  Get experience (e.g. ask your PI to teach a class)  If impossible, then explain the situation and write a good teaching statement where you include your enthusiasm to teach 5Backgrou nd coming from a university not well known for research  Networking/talks to showcase your work  Collaborate with well known lab  Reference letters from well-known scientist(s) department you come from doesn’t reflect your true scientific background  Emphasis your true background in your CV and research statement

48 Red flags in your application package and suggestions about how to deal with them 4Teachingno experience  Get experience (e.g. ask your PI to teach a class)  If impossible, then explain the situation and write a good teaching statement where you include your enthusiasm to teach 5Backgrou nd coming from a university not well known for research  Networking/talks to showcase your work  Collaborate with well known lab  Reference letters from well-known scientist(s) department you come from doesn’t reflect your true scientific background  Emphasis your true background in your CV and research statement

49 Red flags in your application package and suggestions about how to deal with them 4Teachingno experience  Get experience (e.g. ask your PI to teach a class)  If impossible, then explain the situation and write a good teaching statement where you include your enthusiasm to teach 5Backgrou nd coming from a university not well known for research  Networking/talks to showcase your work  Collaborate with well known lab  Reference letters from well-known scientist(s) department you come from doesn’t reflect your true scientific background  Emphasis your true background in your CV and research statement 6Personalitynot so good reputation: scientifically (e.g. over- interpreting data, …), or personally (e.g. bad team player, …)  As a general advise: “the world is small”!  Networking/talks to showcase you and your work  Good reference letters

50 Red flags in your application package and suggestions about how to deal with them 4Teachingno experience  Get experience (e.g. ask your PI to teach a class)  If impossible, then explain the situation and write a good teaching statement where you include your enthusiasm to teach 5Backgrou nd coming from a university not well known for research  Networking/talks to showcase your work  Collaborate with well known lab  Reference letters from well-known scientist(s) department you come from doesn’t reflect your true scientific background  Emphasis your true background in your CV and research statement 6Personalitynot so good reputation: scientifically (e.g. over- interpreting data, …), or personally (e.g. bad team player, …)  As a general advise: “the world is small”!  Networking / talks to showcase you and your work  Good reference letters

51 FINDING A JOB THE TWO BODY PROBLEM Sam Reck-Peterson

52 THE TWO BODY PROBLEM Communicate! Talk to your partner and have a plan. Who is more marketable? How much will you compromise? Is one or both of you interested in non- academic jobs? Living together vs. apart? Will you apply to places that are not commutable? Do you have geographical preferences (try to avoid this). Apply to an excess of jobs (2X) Don’t talk about your partner until you have interviews. If your partner is a very strong candidate too- talk about them after getting an interview. If not, you may want to wait until you have an offer. Communicate! This can be a very stressful time for a relationship.

53 Negotiating and Making a Decision

54 Agenda Components of an offer letter Negotiations Factors to consider before making a decision

55 Components of an Offer Letter Job title Start date Length of contract and renewal information Tenure details (beginning/ending, requirements) Course load and graduate assistant info. Equipment and budget details Salary Deadline to reply

56 When to Negotiate After you receive a formal offer When your gathering of information tells you that your skills and the average offer/range are better than the offer When you feel comfortable doing so

57 Negotiating: Initial Considerations Think about your interests/needs (3 lists: bare essentials/extremely helpful/”gravy”) Consider their interests What are the standards in your field? What are your alternatives? Think about your personal style

58 Negotiable Items for Academic Jobs Salary/benefits Start-up money (lump-sum if possible, no time limit …) Starting date/time to consider offer Teaching load (one year off, possibly team teaching …) Lab facilities/office space Access to equipment Early/delayed tenure options Moving/housing expenses Extra TAs/RAs or secretarial support Parking expenses Assistance with spousal employment

59 The Negotiation Process:  Express your pleasure at receiving the offer (if you treat them badly, others will hear about it!)  Clarify aspects of the offer  Explain your position and reasons for negotiating  Listen for common interests and work toward a mutually rewarding solution  Reiterate the offer as you understand it

60 Final Negotiation Tips: Don’t mention salary on the interview Make the students like you  be personable Research ahead of time and have a sense of your “bottom line” Know the institution - do not press on matters beyond their control Evaluate the whole package It may help to practice ahead of time Don’t bring up your family situation, except if it will make your case for wanting to be in the area (e.g. don’t mention wanting to have more children) Take everything in and try not to show your real feelings Don’t sound desperate, but do sound interested - always thank them for the offer and make positive statements about the job Ask about: expectations, tenure, nomination for awards, training grants (grad students), indirect cost (grants), teaching, funding, housing market/preferred neighborhoods

61 Making a Decision Job Satisfaction: Factors to Consider Work/Lifestyle Values What is your ideal work setting? What kinds of personal interactions are important at work? What work activities are ideal? What must be present outside of work? Research the Field Growth rate? Trends? What are cycles it has gone through? Is there anything about it that may bother you 5-10 years from now?

62 Research University & Dept. Stability History Organizational Culture/Goals Department Organization Size Satisfaction of new and recently tenured faculty The Job Offer Responsibilities Challenges Everyday activities Environment Hours/Stress Making a Decision Job Satisfaction: Factors to Consider

63 Red flags during negotiation/decision Illegal questions/concerns, such as: family, nationality Concerns about preparation/dedication to teaching universities when coming from an research institution Conflicts inside the department Non-concrete answers They don’t want to give a commitment in writing (remember: “Get everything spelled out in writing”)

64 After Negotiations Receive an amended job offer Look it over to see that the correct changes have been made Sign it and send it back by the deadline Congratulations! You have a job!

65 Negotiating for Academic Positions at a Primarily Undergraduate Teaching Institution Laurie Cook Assistant Professor State University of New York College at Brockport

66 Negotiating for Academic Positions at a Primarily Undergraduate Teaching Institution Do Not bring up salary or start-up prior to receiving an offer from the college! Salary –For State positions, there is little room to negotiate. –Remember, what you are hired at will dictate your salary for your entire tenure. –Do your research. Salary studies for similar institutions should help you determine whether the offer is fair. Start-up Monies –Again, for State positions, there is little room to negotiate. –Varies widely ($10K to $100K for non-Ph.D.-granting institutions) –Make up a detailed spreadsheet with all of your estimated costs over a period of 3 years. Be as specific as possible. –Research your equipment needs and make sure they are in working order. If a large piece of equipment is needed for purchase to start your research, it should be negotiated for at the time of salary negotiations.

67 Good Luck!


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