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1 Student Engagement Retreat: The Sophomore Student November 18, 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Student Engagement Retreat: The Sophomore Student November 18, 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Student Engagement Retreat: The Sophomore Student November 18, 2011

2 What is Student Engagement? Student engagement represents the time and effort students devote to activities empirically linked to the intended outcomes of college and what institutions do to both provide these activities and induce students to participate in them (Kuh, 2009). 2

3 Positive Outcomes of Student Engagement Student engagement is generally considered to be among the better predictors of learning and personal development (Carini, Kuh, & Klein, 2006) “Educationally purposeful” practices produce the following student outcomes: – Investing time and effort – Interacting with faculty, staff, and peers about substantive matters – Experiencing diversity – Responding to more frequent feedback – Reflecting and integrating learning – Discovering relevance of learning through real-world experiences ( Brownell & Swaner, 2010) 3

4 4 Student Engagement Project Initial planning to address pressing issues: – Middle States – No Freshman Cars Planning would engage faculty, staff and students in retreat “teams” Planning would continue for all four years of a student’s time at Ramapo

5 Student Engagement for the First-Year Goals and Outcomes Goal 1: Academic Engagement Interaction, participation and interest in gaining skills and increasing knowledge. Seeking ways to relate learning inside the classroom with life outside the classroom. Outcome 1: Students will apply classroom knowledge to current experiences and future goals. Outcome 2: Students will explore their own and other cultures, beliefs, and practices. Outcome 3: Students will use college-level discourse in speaking and writing both individually and in groups. Outcome 4: Students will conduct research and use technology responsibly and effectively. 5

6 Student Engagement for the First-Year Goals and Outcomes Goal 2: Social Engagement Interaction, participation, and interest in socializing with others within an active community. Seeking activities that facilitate positive relationships with others. Outcome 1: Students will explore opportunities for involvement in campus activities. Outcome 2: Students will establish connections with their peers, faculty, and staff. Outcome 3: Students will embrace being a member of the Ramapo College community and celebrate college pride. 6

7 Student Engagement for the First-Year Goals and Outcomes Goal 3: Personal Engagement Interaction, participation, and interest in knowing self and self in relation to the world. Reflection on one’s place on the campus, in the community, and in the world. Understanding one’s strengths and weaknesses and using this knowledge to reach one’s goals. Outcome 1: Students will demonstrate their ability to identify and utilize campus resources when needed. Outcome 2: Students will take responsibility for their personal development and construct a plan to achieve it. Outcome 3: Students will become self-reflective and challenge their current view of the world and their place in it 7

8 Student Engagement for the First-Year Goals and Outcomes Goal 4: Campus/Civic Engagement Interaction, participation and interest in the social, cultural, and leadership aspects of the College. Building the skills necessary to become active, engaged citizens who make the College, the nation and the world better places to live, learn, and work. Outcome 1: Students will understand their roles, rights and responsibilities as citizens of the Ramapo campus. Outcome 2: Students will understand their roles, rights and responsibilities as local, national and global citizens 8

9 Student Engagement for the First-Year Criteria for Key Points of Engagement A structured opportunity designed for all first-year students; A structured opportunity open to all first-year students; and A high-impact activity or an activity leading to a high-impact activity, meaning that it is: – A substantive interaction, in class and out of class, with peers, faculty, and staff or – A common experience that deepens understanding of self and others or – An opportunity to connect in-class and out-of-class learning. 9

10 First-Year Map KPEAcademicSocialPersonalCampus/Civic Orientation xx x Summer Reading/Convocation x x x x AlcoholEdu x x Arching and First Year Assembly x Maroon Madness xxxxx Choices and Consequences x x x Green Dot x xx x LollaNoBooza xxx Club Fair x FYS/Peersx xx x xx x Advisingx xx 10

11 Continued work on First-Year Student Engagement Overseen by the First-Year Experience Board Developing KPEs where there are noticeable gaps in outcomes (service, diversity, international) Continued Assessment of KPEs and adjusting for AY12-13

12 12 Charge for the Sophomore-Year Retreat Participants As part of Ramapo College’s Student Engagement Project (SEP), retreat participants will help the Student Engagement Steering Committee develop plans for the sophomore year. Specifically, participants will: Identify the specific needs of sophomore students; Review best practices for addressing the specific needs of sophomore students; Review the sophomore student engagement goals and outcomes to ensure that they match the developmental needs of sophomore students;

13 Charge for the Sophomore-Year Retreat Participants Identify existing activities that potentially match the needs of sophomore students; Recommend and design new activities where gaps exist; Align activities to the sophomore student engagement outcomes; Develop assessment plans and other documents for the activities; and Create a communication plan for the activities. 13

14 14 Who Are Our Sophomore Students? If we define sophomores as students who have earned 32 to 63 credits, we can say the following about our sophomore students: 61% came to Ramapo College as freshmen 36% are transfer students 60% live on campus The top three majors for sophomore-students in descending order are psychology, undeclared (12%), and communication arts.

15 15 Who Are Our First-Year Students? If we define first-year students as students who have earned 0-31 credits, we can say the following about our first-year students: 89% came to Ramapo College directly from high school 11% are transfer students 79.9% live on campus The top three majors for first-year students in descending order are undeclared (18%), nursing, and biology

16 16 Research on Sophomore Students Academic Impressions Webinar on engaging sophomores (8/3/11) Hunter, M.S., Tobolowsky, B.F., Gardner, J.N. (2010). Helping Sophomores Succeed: Understanding and Improving the Second-Year Experience

17 Understanding the Needs of Sophomores Overview Sophomore Slump Search for Purpose Academic Self-Efficacy and Major Selection Career Development Academic Engagement 17

18 Understanding the Needs of Sophomores Sophomore Slump Let-down from the structured support and activity of the first-year experience Boredom and apathy Alienation and dissatisfaction 18

19 Understanding the Needs of Sophomores Search for purpose Motivation Identity and self-reflection Values and spirituality Social integration and involvement 19

20 Understanding the Needs of Sophomores Academic Self-Efficacy and Major Selection Academic self-efficacy as a predictor of student academic success Declaring a major requires an attachment and commitment to ideas, interests and a group of faculty Positive impact of being clear and decided about major 20

21 Understanding the Needs of Sophomores Career Development Developmentally undecided vs. chronically undecided Major selection and career decision do not necessarily go hand in hand 21

22 Understanding the Needs of Sophomores Academic Engagement Contact with faculty is one of the strongest predictors of persistence, engagement and success Substantive, educationally meaningful faculty-student interactions are critical (feedback, mentoring, advising, research, co-curricular activities, etc.) Importance of active/engaged learning Effort and time on task 22

23 Best Practices for Sophomore Students Overview Help Sophomores Make the Transition Help Sophomores Engage with Academics and Others Help Sophomores Make Life Decisions and Develop Purpose Help Sophomores See the World and Make a Difference 23

24 24 Best Practices for Sophomore Students Help Sophomores Make the Transition End-of-First-Year Event Sophomore Convocation, Retreat, and/or Common Reading

25 25 Best Practices for Sophomore Students Help Sophomores Engage with Academics and Others Living-Learning Communities Mentorship Programs Faculty-Student Research

26 26 Best Practices for Sophomore Students Help Sophomores Make Life Decisions and Develop Purpose Academic Advising Career Exploration Spirituality Programs

27 27 Best Practices for Sophomore Students Help Sophomores See the World and Make a Difference Study Abroad Internships Service-Learning On Campus Employment

28 28 Discussion of Proposed Sophomore Goals and Outcomes Goal 1: Academic Engagement Interaction, participation and interest in gaining skills and increasing knowledge. Seeking ways to relate learning inside the classroom with life outside the classroom. Outcome 1: Students will apply classroom knowledge to current experiences and future goals. Outcome 2: Students will explore their own and other cultures, beliefs, and practices. Outcome 3: Students will use college-level discourse in speaking and writing both individually and in groups. Outcome 4: Students will conduct research and use technology responsibly and effectively.

29 Discussion of Proposed Sophomore Goals and Outcomes Goal 2: Social Engagement Interaction, participation, and interest in socializing with others within an active community. Seeking activities that facilitate positive relationships with others. Outcome 1: Students will participate in campus activities. Outcome 2: Students will interact meaningfully with faculty, staff, and peers and reflect on those interactions. Outcome 3: Students will actively serve or participate in the Ramapo College community. 29

30 Discussion of Proposed Sophomore Goals and Outcomes Goal 3: Personal Engagement Interaction, participation, and interest in knowing self and self in relation to the world. Reflection on one’s place on the campus, in the community, and in the world. Understanding one’s strengths and weaknesses and using this knowledge to reach one’s goals. Outcome 1: Students will utilize campus resources when needed. Outcome 2: Students will engage in self-reflection and develop a sense of purpose. Outcome 3: Students will reflect on their current view of the world and their place in it. Outcome 4: Students will reflect on their academic performance, strengths, and interests in order to identify an appropriate major. Outcome 5: Students will explore opportunities for career development. 30

31 Discussion of Proposed Sophomore Goals and Outcomes Goal 4: Campus and Civic Engagement Interaction, participation and interest in the social, cultural, and leadership aspects of the College. Building the skills necessary to become active, engaged citizens who make the College, the nation and the world better places to live, learn, and work. Outcome 1: Students will engage actively as responsible citizens of the Ramapo campus. Outcome 2: Students will understand their roles, rights and responsibilities as local, national and global citizens. 31

32 32 Discussion of Proposed Criteria for Sophomore KPEs A high-impact activity or an activity leading to a high-impact activity, meaning that it is: – A substantive interaction, in class and out of class, with peers, faculty, and staff or – A common experience that deepens understanding of self and others or – An opportunity to connect in-class and out-of-class learning. An opportunity, either designed for or beneficial to sophomore students, that meets their developmental needs. An opportunity that fosters self-reflection and leads to personal development.

33 33 Inventory of Existing Activities that Meet or Could Meet KPE Criteria

34 34 Proposed Criteria for Sophomore KPEs A high-impact activity or an activity leading to a high-impact activity, meaning that it is: – A substantive interaction, in class and out of class, with peers, faculty, and staff or – A common experience that deepens understanding of self and others or – An opportunity to connect in-class and out-of-class learning. An opportunity, either designed for or beneficial to sophomore students, that meets their developmental needs. An opportunity that fosters self-reflection and leads to personal development.

35 35 Identification of Gaps and Potential New Sophomore Activities

36 36 Closing Remarks


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