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To Cohort or Not to Cohort: An Experiment in Extensive Integration and Partial Differentiation Yevgeniya V. Zastavker Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering.

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Presentation on theme: "To Cohort or Not to Cohort: An Experiment in Extensive Integration and Partial Differentiation Yevgeniya V. Zastavker Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering."— Presentation transcript:

1 To Cohort or Not to Cohort: An Experiment in Extensive Integration and Partial Differentiation Yevgeniya V. Zastavker Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering AAPT 127 th National Meeting Physics Outside the Box August 2-6, Madison, WI

2 2August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Why a New Engineering College? A superb command of the engineering fundamentals Broad perspectives on the role of engineering in society The creativity to envision new solution to engineering challenges The entrepreneurial skills to bring vision to reality A call for “systemic engineering education reform” to prepare leaders able to predict, create and manage the technologies of the future. NSF, ABET, ASCE, NAE, ASEE, NRC circa 1990

3 3August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Clean Slate: Creating a “Renaissance Engineer” Size: Projected total enrollment – 600. Program: Undergraduate engineering. Majors: B.S. in electrical and computer engineering, mechanical engineering and engineering Curriculum: Project-based, team-oriented approach emphasizing business and entrepreneurship, arts and humanities and rigorous technical fundamentals. Scholarship: All admitted students receive a four-year full-tuition scholarship valued at $120,000. Faculty: 25 full-time and 2 academic partners; 17 men and 10 women Student to Faculty Ratio: Currently 5 to 1; anticipated ratio of 10 to 1 at full enrollment of 600 students. Innovations: No tenure awarded, no academic departments; faculty is multi-disciplinary.

4 4August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Rigorous Engineering Fundamentals AHS Arts/Humanities/Social Sciences Creativity, Innovation, Design, and CommunicationsE! Business/Entrepreneurship Philanthropy and Ethics Curricular Philosophy

5 5August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Curriculum Distinctive Features interdisciplinary teaching; interdisciplinary teaching; an emphasis on teamwork and communication; an emphasis on teamwork and communication; consideration of the social, economic, and political consideration of the social, economic, and political contexts of engineering; contexts of engineering; an emphasis on design- and project-based learning: an emphasis on design- and project-based learning: “do-learn” environment; “do-learn” environment; passionate pursuits and co-curricular activities; passionate pursuits and co-curricular activities; gates: regular institution-wide assessment periods; gates: regular institution-wide assessment periods; sophomore and senior design projects: capstones. sophomore and senior design projects: capstones.

6 6August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Curricular Structure

7 Foundation Years Curricular Scope NON-DEGREE CREDIT : NON-DEGREE CREDIT : extracurricular activities undertaken for non-degree credit, e.g. Passionate Pursuits, Co-Curricular Activities, Research, or Independent Studies; GATES : GATES : end of year assessment activities; LEARNING PLANS : LEARNING PLANS : student-written documents used to shape his/her education. COHORTS: COHORTS: integrated block of course(s) and project(s); FREE-STANDING COURSES: FREE-STANDING COURSES: non-cohorted courses and projects, including free electives; AHS: AHS: arts, humanities and social sciences; SOPHOMORE DESIGN PROJECT: SOPHOMORE DESIGN PROJECT: team design and implementation of a student-chosen product;

8 8August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Foundation Structure Free Elective -or- Independent Study Arts, Humanities, And Social Sciences (AHS) Passionate Pursuits Research (optional) Option 3 Option 2 Cohort :Physical and Mathematical Foundations of Engineering II and Engineering Project Linear Algebra and Vector Calculus Electricity and Magnetism, Circuits and Optics Electrical Engineering and CS Project(s) and Practica Option 1 Year 1, Spring Semester Gate Signals and Systems Arts, Humanities, And Social Sciences (AHS) Passionate Pursuits Research (optional) Option 3 Option 2 Cohort :Physical and Mathematical Foundations of Engineering I and Engineering Project Calculus and Ordinary Differential Equations Newtonian Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Fluids, and Waves Mechanical Engineering Project(s) and Practica Option 1 Year 1, Fall Semester

9 9August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box “Cohort” Philosophy and History Course Sequence –OR- Integrated course block coordination of curriculum to stress the links between science, mathematics, and engineering; coordination of curriculum to stress the links between science, mathematics, and engineering; providing a common foundation to all engineering students regardless of their specialization; providing a common foundation to all engineering students regardless of their specialization; handling of open-ended problems; handling of open-ended problems; interdisciplinary learning and working on multidisciplinary problems; interdisciplinary learning and working on multidisciplinary problems; an emphasis on teamwork and cooperative working environment. an emphasis on teamwork and cooperative working environment. Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology: Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology: Math, Physics, Chemistry, Design, Graphical Communication, CS; Arizona State University: Arizona State University: English, Math, Physics, Engineering Design; North Carolina State University: North Carolina State University: CS, Civil Engineering, Math, Physics, ECE; Drexel University: Drexel University: Math, Science, and Engineering.

10 10August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box “Cohort” Philosophy and History Integrated course block equivalent to 1 or more conventional course(s) and project(s) interdisciplinary teaching and learning; interdisciplinary teaching and learning; an emphasis on teamwork and communication; an emphasis on teamwork and communication; handling of open-ended problems; handling of open-ended problems; an emphasis on design- and project-based learning: “do-learn” environment; an emphasis on design- and project-based learning: “do-learn” environment; consideration of the social, economic, and political contexts of engineering; consideration of the social, economic, and political contexts of engineering; relationship between theory and application; relationship between theory and application; student choice of an application or “cohort flavor” or “cohort option”. student choice of an application or “cohort flavor” or “cohort option”. Project Course B Course A Course B

11 11August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Cohort Structure “Things That Go” Cohort or miniature drag racers “Moving On Up!” Cohort or rice ramp devices “Kinetic Sculpture” Cohort or integrating motion and art

12 12August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Cohort Vision and Implementation “Things That Go” Cohort or miniature drag racers “Moving On Up!” Cohort or rice ramp devices “Kinetic Sculpture” Cohort or integrating motion and art # of projects211 Project uniquenesscommoncommonunique Math- Physics Integrationstrongweakmoderate Math- Project Integrationstrongweakmoderate Physics- Project Integrationstrongweakmoderate

13 13August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Cohort Syllabus Map “Things That Go” Cohort or miniature drag racers “Moving On Up!” Cohort or rice ramp devices “Kinetic Sculpture” Cohort or integrating motion and art MathPhysicsProject

14 14August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Project Syllabus: “Things That Go” Cohort Weeks 1 – 3 Measurement and Drawing; SolidWorks Weeks 4 – 6 Fabrication Practicum; SolidWorks Weeks 7 – 9 Teaming Practicum; Water Rocket: Modeling (SolidWorks and MatLab), Building and Competition Weeks 10 – 12 Information Literacy; Dragster Design: Modeling (SolidWorks and MatLab), and Fabrication Dragster Design: Modeling (SolidWorks and MatLab), and Fabrication Weeks 13 – 15 Dragster: Fabrication and Competition

15 15August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Cohort Syllabus: “Things That Go” Cohort Week Number Cohort Physics 1 o Introductions o Teaming exercise o Vectors, Sequences, limits, induction o Estimation o Measurement, drawing 2 o L’hopital, improper integrals, coordinates, o parametric equations o 3D Kinematics o SolidWorks 3 o 1st order DEs and applications o Newton’s Laws, forces o SolidWorks, fabrication practicum 4 o 1st order Des and applications o Work, forces, energy o Fabrication practicum 5 o Series, center of mass o Momentum o Fabrication practicum 6 o Series o Thermodynamics o Fabrication 8 o Reviews 9 o 2nd order DEs and applications o Angular Momentum, Conservation of Angular Momentum Angular Momentum o Teaming 10 o DEs and applications o Thermodynamics o Design, information literacy 11 o DEs and applications o Thermodynamics o Design 12 o DEs and applications o Waves o Fabrication 13 o DEs and applications o Waves o Fabrication 14 o Preliminary demonstration 15 o Fabrication o Product demonstration o Competition 7 o Series, discs, washers, shells o Moments of inertia, torque, and rotational energy energy o Rocket 2 Week Number Traditional Physics

16 16August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Physics Syllabus: “Things That Go” Cohort vs. Traditional Physics 1 Preludes: Estimation, Measurements, Uncertainties, Dimensional Analysis, Scaling Arguments Vectors: Addition, Multiplication, Dot and Cross Products 2 Coordinates 1D Kinematics 2D and 3D Kinematics Relative Motion: Reference Frames 3 Circular Motion Newton’s Laws of Motion Forces: Tension 4 Forces: Friction, Gravitation Hooke’s Law Simple Harmonic Motion 5 Work Done by Various Forces Conservative and Nonconservative Forces Kinetic Energy 6 Kinetic and Potential Energies CWE, Conservation of Mechanical Energy Oscillations and Energy DEs: Forced and Damped Oscillations 7 Gravitational PE Escape Velocities, Orbits Momentum and Collisions Week Number Traditional Physics Week Number Cohort Physics 1 o Introductions o Teaming exercise o Vectors, Sequences, limits, induction o Estimation o Measurement, drawing 2 o L’hopital, improper integrals, coordinates, o Parametric equations o 3D Kinematics o SolidWorks 3 o 1st order DEs and applications o Newton’s Laws, forces o SolidWorks, fabrication practicum 4 o 1st order Des and applications o Work, forces, energy o Fabrication practicum 5 o Series, center of mass o Momentum o Fabrication practicum 6 o Series o Thermodynamics o Fabrication 7 o Series, discs, washers, shells o Moments of inertia, torque, and rotational energy energy o Rocket 2

17 17August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Physics Syllabus: “Things That Go” Cohort vs. Traditional Physics 8 o Review 9 o 2nd order DEs and applications o Angular Momentum, Conservation of Angular Momentum Angular Momentum o Teaming 10 o DEs and applications o Thermodynamics o Design, information literacy 11 o DEs and applications o Thermodynamics o Design 12 o DEs and applications o Waves o Fabrication 13 o DEs and applications o Waves o Fabrication 14 o Preliminary demonstration 15 o Fabrication o Product demonstration o Competition Week Number Traditional Physics 8 Center of Mass; Rockets Impulse, Rockets Angular Momentum, Spin, Orbital Motion9 Kepler’s Laws, Elliptical Orbits Torque Rotating Rigid Bodies, Moment of Inertia Rotational KE 10 Conservation of Angular Momentum Solids and Elasticity Fluid Mechanics 11 Hydrostatics Waves Sound Waves, Doppler Effect 12 Liquids and Gases Thermodynamics: the First Law Ideal Gas 13 Kinetic Theory: Isothermal Atmosphere, Phase Diagrams, Phase Transitions Specific Heat, Equipartition Theorem 14 The Second Law of Thermodynamics Engine, the Carnot Cycle, Entropy 15 Review Week Number Traditional Physics

18 18August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Physics Syllabus: “Things That Go” Cohort vs. Traditional Physics o Much faster pace; o Flexible physics calendar; o Sequence of topics dependent on project and math necessities; o Co-dependence on math and project for presentation of various topics; o Creative “lab” environment: no “canned” laboratory exercises and write-ups; o Learning of lab design and manufacturing skills; o Direct application of knowledge gained in class environment

19 19August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Project Syllabi: “Things That Go” vs. “Kinetic Sculpture” Cohort Weeks 1 – 3 Measurement and Drawing; SolidWorks Teaming Practicum; Information Literacy; Introduction to Sculpting; SolidWorks Weeks 4 – 6 Fabrication Practicum; SolidWorks Team Sculpture Design: Detailed Sketch, SolidWorks, Written Report Individual Design Reviews Weeks 7 – 9 Teaming Practicum; Water Rocket: Modeling (SolidWorks and MatLab), Building and Competition Individual Design Reviews: Relevant Physics & Math; Kinetic Sculpture Modeling: SolidWorks and Working Model, Written Report Weeks Information Literacy; Dragster Design Modeling: Dragster Design Modeling: SolidWorks and MatLab and Fabrication Kinetic Sculpture: Individual Math and Physics Tutoring; Fabrication and Prototyping Weeks 13 – 15 Dragster: Fabrication and Competition Kinetic Sculpture: Fabrication, Show, and Written Report

20 20August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Physics Syllabus: “Kinetic Sculpture” Cohort vs. Traditional Physics o Much faster pace; o Flexible physics calendar; o Sequence of topics dependent on math necessities; o Co-dependence on math and project for presentation of various topics; o LOTS of individual tutoring of physics, math, and fabrication; o Creative “lab” environment: no “canned” laboratory exercises and write-ups; o Learning of lab design and manufacturing skills; o Direct application of knowledge gained in class environment

21 21August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Student Reactions to Physics: Cohort Comparison “Things That Go” “Moving On Up!”“Kinetic Sculpture”All Courses The Content of This Course Was This Course Stimulated My Interest in the Subject This Course Provided Opportunities to Apply the Knowledge I Gained Assignments in This Course Contributed Effectively to My Learning

22 22August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Student Reactions to Physics: Cohort Comparison “Things That Go” “Moving On Up!”“Kinetic Sculpture” This Course Was Well-Coordinated With Other Courses In This Cohort This Course Was Well-Integrated With Other Courses In This Cohort

23 23August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box The Cohort System Pros holistic and coherent education; blurring the boundaries between science, engineering, and social aspects; learning to work in a “real-world environment”; learning to work in a “real-world environment”; transferability of the teaching method; transferability of the teaching method; fostering learning by motivation. fostering learning by motivation. I’m not sure what was reinforcing what—it all went together: exactly as I expected. WOW. This is how the real world works. THIS IS EXACTLY HOW OLIN SHOULD BE. I LOVE MY COHORT. There were many times where I was unsure whether I was doing math homework, physics homework, a projects assignment or even EC homework. The project showed us that the math and physics had actual uses in things like projectiles. The projects are like a direct reward for learning the math and physics. We’re able to cover so much, so well, because it all intertwines and reinforces each other and the project backs it up. This was an eye-opening physics class. Practical applications of the physics were dripping all throughout the course. Students Speaking:

24 24August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box The Cohort System Cons large faculty time commitment; restrictions on the choice of each discipline topics; restrictions on scheduling of each discipline topic (dependence on other restrictions on scheduling of each discipline topic (dependence on other disciplines); disciplines); steep learning curve for instructors: learning each other’s “language”; steep learning curve for instructors: learning each other’s “language”; difficulty with advanced students and their needs. difficulty with advanced students and their needs. I can definitely see that for a project like Kinetic Sculpture, getting to the relevant physics in time for students to have the resources they need, when they need them, is terribly tricky. In this cohort, the math and physics are just normal classes like anywhere else, and we apply what we learn in project…What would be truly innovative and useful would be if the project class provided the motivation for learning by raising questions an instigating thought BEFORE the other classes teach the concepts. A big disadvantage is that if you don’t understand something in particular, you may be messed up in the other subjects of the cohort as well. I have come to hate do-learn. I just want to be taught, lectured to even. It’s so frustrating to be thrown into a situation with so little preparation and so little instruction. We can only take so much of the do-learn method before we get discouraged. Students Speaking:

25 25August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box Lessons Learned Cohort must be physics – centered (not project – centered), I.e. it must serve the role of the tie between math and projects; Cohort must be physics – centered (not project – centered), I.e. it must serve the role of the tie between math and projects; Many small projects must be done prior to completing a final project; Many small projects must be done prior to completing a final project; Projects must be common, not individualized; Projects must be common, not individualized; Project must be well-defined and well-constrained; Project must be well-defined and well-constrained; The choice of small projects must be made on the basis of physics learned and fabrication skills; The choice of small projects must be made on the basis of physics learned and fabrication skills; Extra thought must be placed into correct utilization of the “do-learn” methodology. Extra thought must be placed into correct utilization of the “do-learn” methodology.

26 26August 2 - 6, 2003Physics Outside the Box We Welcome You To Visit Us at College!


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