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10/6/2014. In your notebooks, answer in 2-3 sentences:  What is mood?  How do authors create a mood? DO NOW.

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Presentation on theme: "10/6/2014. In your notebooks, answer in 2-3 sentences:  What is mood?  How do authors create a mood? DO NOW."— Presentation transcript:

1 10/6/2014

2 In your notebooks, answer in 2-3 sentences:  What is mood?  How do authors create a mood? DO NOW

3 Agenda  Do Now  Housekeeping  “O Me! O Life!” – Walt Whitman  “The Raven” – Edgar Allen Poe  Classwork  HW Objective  In this lesson, students will learn to analyze how imagery contributes to the mood of different poems by examining specific word choice. AGENDA AND OBJECTIVE

4  If you miss an assignment, please come and see me.  You will have up to two weeks to complete the assignment without loss of credit.  After that, unless agreed upon, it will be a zero.  This is more than fair. Although I want you to complete the assignments, there has to be some accountability. REVISED GRADING POLICY

5 DICTION, IMAGERY AND MOOD

6  Diction refers to the words chosen by the author for the text.  Remember – authors have created a roadmap with purpose For example: “The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars.” – Jack Kerouac, On the Road  Why choose words like “mad” and “burn”? DICTION

7  Diction (word choice) is directly related to IMAGERY.  IMAGERY is an author's use of descriptive language that appeals to human senses to deepen the reader's understanding of the work. Powerful forms of imagery engage all of the senses.  Sight  Smell  Taste  Sound  Touch IMAGERY

8  burn, burn, burn (touch, smell, sight)  like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding (sound, sight, smell)  like spiders across the stars (sight, touch) FOR EXAMPLE…

9  Authors use diction and imagery together to create a MOOD of the piece.  The mood evokes certain feelings in readers.  How do you feel when you read the piece?  How did the author’s words get you there? MOOD

10 DICTION, IMAGERY AND MOOD IN POETRY

11 Oh me! Oh life! of the questions of these recurring, Of the endless trains of the faithless, of cities fill’d with the foolish, Of myself forever reproaching myself, (for who more foolish than I, and who more faithless?) Of eyes that vainly crave the light, of the objects mean, of the struggle ever renew’d, Of the poor results of all, of the plodding and sordid crowds I see around me, Of the empty and useless years of the rest, with the rest me intertwined, The question, O me! so sad, recurring—What good amid these, O me, O life? Answer: That you are here—that life exists and identity, That the powerful play goes on, and you may contribute a verse. “O ME! O LIFE!” – WALT WHITMAN

12 What words stick out? Oh me! Oh life! of the questions of these recurring, Of the endless trains of the faithless, of cities fill’d with the foolish, Of myself forever reproaching myself, (for who more foolish than I, and who more faithless?) Of eyes that vainly crave the light, of the objects mean, of the struggle ever renew’d, Of the poor results of all, of the plodding and sordid crowds I see around me, Of the empty and useless years of the rest, with the rest me intertwined, The question, O me! so sad, recurring—What good amid these, O me, O life? “OH ME! OH LIFE!” STANZA 1

13 What words stick out? Oh me! Oh life! of the questions of these recurring, Of the endless trains of the faithless, of cities fill’d with the foolish, Of myself forever reproaching myself, (for who more foolish than I, and who more faithless?) Of eyes that vainly crave the light, of the objects mean, of the struggle ever renew’d, Of the poor results of all, of the plodding and sordid crowds I see around me, Of the empty and useless years of the rest, with the rest me intertwined, The question, O me! so sad, recurring—What good amid these, O me, O life? “OH ME! OH LIFE!” STANZA 1

14 Answer: That you are here—that life exists and identity, That the powerful play goes on, and you may contribute a verse. What words stick out? Answer: That you are here—that life exists and identity, That the powerful play goes on, and you may contribute a verse. “OH ME! OH LIFE!” STANZA 2

15 “Endless trains of the faithless” – trains of people packed together who are lost and hopeless “struggle ever renew’d” = an endless struggle “plodding and sordid” = people walking slowly along (almost like zombies) “empty and useless” = hopeless STANZA 1 - WHAT PICTURES?

16 “life exists and identity” = there is still life to live and you have a place “powerful play goes on” = even though the struggle doesn’t stop (stanza 1), life still goes on “you may contribute a verse” = you have a place here and you have something to give to this world. STANZA 2 – WHAT PICTURES?

17 Whitman presents feelings of hopelessness in the first stanza with words like, “foolish” and faithless,” but later makes the reader feel invigorated because of his words, “you may contribute a verse.” WHAT IS THE EFFECT ON THE READER? (MOOD)

18  Read Chapter 12 of To Kill a Mockingbird. FOR HOMEWORK

19 10/7/2014

20  In your notebooks, respond to this in 3-4 sentences:  Is Calpurnia’s comment that, “When [folks] don’t want to learn there’s nothing you can do but keep your mouth shut or talk their language” (143) the same as Atticus’ comment that, “Sometimes it’s better to bend the law a little bit in special circumstances” (33)? DO NOW

21 Agenda  Do now  TKAM Discussion  Diction, Imagery and Mood in Emily Dickinson  D.I.M in “Beat! Beat! Drums!” by Walt Whitman  Exit Objective  In this lesson, students will learn to analyze how imagery contributes to the mood of different poems by examining specific word choice. AGENDA AND OBJECTIVE

22  Do you think Atticus is right when he tells Jem that you should be nice to someone no matter how mean they are to you? (Like Mrs. Dubose from Chapter 11). TKAM DISCUSSION

23 DICTION, IMAGERY AND MOOD IN EMILY DICKINSON

24  Diction  author word choice  Imagery  author’s use of words to create vivid and descriptive images that appeal to the reader’s senses  Mood  how the reader feels and reacts to the word choice and imagery created by the author REVIEW…

25  As we read the poem, please fill out the chart provided.  Step 1 - What words paint a picture in your mind?  Step 2 – What kind of picture do they paint?  Step 3 – How do these words create a specific effect on the reader? “BECAUSE I COULD NOT STOP FOR DEATH” BY EMILY DICKINSON

26 Because I could not stop for Death – He kindly stopped for me – The Carriage held but just Ourselves – And Immortality. We slowly drove – He knew no haste And I had put away My labor and my leisure too, For His Civility – We passed the School, where Children strove At Recess – in the Ring – We passed the Fields of Gazing Grain – We passed the Setting Sun – “BECAUSE I COULD NOT STOP FOR DEATH” STANZAS 1-3

27 Or rather – He passed us – The Dews drew quivering and chill – For only Gossamer, my Gown – My Tippet – only Tulle – We paused before a House that seemed A Swelling of the Ground – The Roof was scarcely visible – The Cornice – in the Ground – Since then – ‘tis Centuries – and yet Feels shorter than the Day I first surmised the Horses’ Heads Were toward Eternity – “BECAUSE I COULD NOT STOP FOR DEATH” STANZAS 4-6

28 10/8/2014

29  Refer to the conversation between Scout, Jem and Atticus at the end of Chapter 13 – why does Atticus tell the kids they have to know their ancestors so they “behave accordingly?” (151).  Answer in your notebooks in 3-4 sentences. DO NOW

30 Agenda  Do now/Share Out  Diction, Imagery and Mood in Emily Dickinson Part II  D.I.M in “Beat! Beat! Drums!” by Walt Whitman  Partner work  Exit ticket Objective  Students will learn to analyze how imagery contributes to the mood of different poems by examining specific word choice. AGENDA AND OBJECTIVE

31 “BECAUSE I COULD NOT STOP FOR DEATH”

32 Because I could not stop for Death – He kindly stopped for me – The Carriage held but just Ourselves – And Immortality. We slowly drove – He knew no haste And I had put away My labor and my leisure too, For His Civility – We passed the School, where Children strove At Recess – in the Ring – We passed the Fields of Gazing Grain – We passed the Setting Sun – “BECAUSE I COULD NOT STOP FOR DEATH” STANZAS 1-3

33 Or rather – He passed us – The Dews drew quivering and chill – For only Gossamer, my Gown – My Tippet – only Tulle – We paused before a House that seemed A Swelling of the Ground – The Roof was scarcely visible – The Cornice – in the Ground – Since then – ‘tis Centuries – and yet Feels shorter than the Day I first surmised the Horses’ Heads Were toward Eternity – “BECAUSE I COULD NOT STOP FOR DEATH” STANZAS 4-6

34 “BEAT! BEAT! DRUMS!” WALT WHITMAN

35  With your pre- assigned partners, please answer the corresponding questions related to diction, imagery and mood. “BEAT! BEAT! DRUMS!”

36 PARTNERS! Period 2Period 3Period 4Period 5 Mario/JarrodCorey/AmandaMegan/FrankieAnthony/Hanna Vin/Ava-LorenEunice/TimVictoria/ScottVin C/Joe Jess/DomRaven/AndrewMarissa/ChristianAnge/Jimmy Yogesh/RobChris/Vin OJulianna/WilliamAlexa C/Lance Mike/AlanaIsabella/AlejandroBrina/KennethTom/Kristy Jillian/Jay JayMark/Vin IDom/EricAlexa P/Tarrin Sonia/TayybeDave/NatalieGabby/JakeBrooke/Rachel/Michelle Mike M/RuchaJoanne/Dan HAlex/ChrisLauren/Sameer Dave/AashJocelyn/Willy/Dan CJuliane/GregNicole/Seamus

37  Please read chapter 14 of Mockingbird. HOMEWORK

38  On a separate sheet of paper, explain how diction and imagery affect the reader’s mood in 2-3 sentences. EXIT TICKET


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