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The Tao of Winnie the Pooh * Taoism (pronounced Dowism) is a common religion in Asia. Like Buddhism, there are not gods. Instead, they follow the teachings.

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Presentation on theme: "The Tao of Winnie the Pooh * Taoism (pronounced Dowism) is a common religion in Asia. Like Buddhism, there are not gods. Instead, they follow the teachings."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Tao of Winnie the Pooh * Taoism (pronounced Dowism) is a common religion in Asia. Like Buddhism, there are not gods. Instead, they follow the teachings of a man named Lao Tze.

2 The Tao of Winnie the Pooh *Tao (pronounced Dow) means “The Path” (to happiness)

3 The Tao of Winnie the Pooh There are three secrets to being happy: *COMPASSION (care for others) *HUMILITY (being down-to-earth) *MODERATION (enjoy everything in small amounts, but don’t go crazy!)

4 The Tao of Winnie the Pooh LAO SAYS: *Happiness is finding balance… in yourself and nature. *Finding joy and laughter in everyday moments is the key. *Let go of stress and worry and forget about things that make you sad.

5 The Tao of Winnie the Pooh If this sounds familiar, it’s because LAO’s ideas are the same as another great philosopher you know: Winnie the Pooh! Some people argue that the Pooh stories are actually stories to help people understand Taoism and teach life lessons.

6 The Tao of Winnie the Pooh Here are some quotes from Pooh that match up perfectly with the teachings of Lao, who probably lived in China about 6 years before the birth of Jesus.

7 A clever mind is not a heart. "Rabbit's clever," said Pooh thoughtfully. "Yes," said Piglet. "Rabbit's clever." "And he has Brain." "Yes," said Piglet, "Rabbit has Brain." There was a long silence. "I suppose," said Pooh, "that that's why he never understands anything."

8 There is more to knowing than just being correct. "Lot's of people talk to animals," said Pooh. "Maybe, but..." "Not very many listen, though," he said. "That's the problem," he added.

9 The wise know their limitations; the foolish do not. Roo and Tigger were walking along the forest one morning, and Tigger was talking about all the things that Tiggers can do.... "I can swim," said Roo. "I fell into the river, and I swimmed. Can Tiggers swim?" "Of course they can. Tiggers can do everything." "Can they climb trees better than Pooh?" asked Roo, stopping under the tallest Pine Tree, and looking up at it. "Climbing trees is what they do best," said Tigger. "Much better than Poohs." And the next thing they knew, they were stuck in the tallest pine tree.

10 Did you Know? Each character from the 100 Acre Woods is a symbol of Taoist philosophy? This means that each has a personality or character traits that demonstrate one of the teachings of Taoism. Taoism talks about keeping things natural, uncomplicated, and simple... Just like our favorite bear. Taoism says, “Don’t think or plan or do, just BE!” "While Eeyore frets and Piglet hesitates... and Rabbit calculates... and Owl pontificates...Pooh just is."

11 Which Pooh are You? Look over the descriptions of each Pooh character. Think about which personality traits you have in common with each character…

12 The Tao of Pooh Pooh is kind of clueless, maybe a bit of an airhead. Pooh is almost always happy. Pooh wanders through life happily. He has no goals, but no disappointments Pooh is looking for a simple pleasure. Cake, balloons and a full belly are the key to happiness.

13 The Tao of Piglet Piglet is a loyal friend. Piglet is never the center of attention. Piglet thinks of other people’s feelings first. Piglet needs a lot of pats on the back. Piglet wants to please and get approval. Piglet prefers one good friend to a group. Piglet worries.

14 The Tao of Tigger Tigger is energetic, physical, and fun! Tigger is impulsive (doesn’t think before he acts), and is likely to get into trouble. Tigger is loud and never sits still. Tigger is emotional and often flies into a rage or gets upset, but gets over it quickly. Tigger likes noise and music and sports… the louder and more physical, the better.

15 The Tao of Eeyore Eeyore is slightly cynical, expecting bad things will happen to him. Eeyore focuses on problems and complains. Eeyore loses things a lot and is forgetful. Eeyore is pessimistic, and worries a lot. Eeyore is often shy, tired, or sad. In spite of this, Eeyore is lovable and loves his friends and family.

16 The Tao of Rabbit Rabbit likes to be in charge, is detail- oriented, clever, and good at planning. Rabbit can be counted on in an emergency. Rabbit is very organized and neat, and likes everything in its place. Rabbit is uncomfortable around mess and chaos, and likes to follow a schedule.

17 The Tao of Owl Owl is academic (scholarly and well-educated). Owl is a problem solver, is thoughtful, and uses common sense. Owl reads a lot, and knows a lot about a lot. Owl loves to show off how smart he is. Owl is very wise, and would be a good scientist or professor.

18 The Tao of Kanga Kanga is sweet and nurturing. Kanga loves small children. Kanga makes sure everyone is safe and fed. Kanga is gentle and loving and comforting. Kanga likes a cozy home and quiet moments, and makes a great parent.

19 The Tao of Christopher Robin Christopher Robin is imaginative. He is very clever and artistic, and has good ideas. He would make a good actor or writer. He loves a good story. He loves to be surrounded by friends. He is a daydreamer and loves to play.

20 I Want to Know! You are going to be explaining to me who you are… in terms of Tao and Pooh! You might be one character or a combination of two. Maybe you think you know who I am too…

21 The Tao of Pooh by: Benjamin Hoff "What's this you're writing?" asked Pooh, climbing onto the writing table. "The Tao of Pooh," I replied. "The how of Pooh?" asked Pooh, smudging one of the words I had just written. "The Tao of Pooh," I relpied, poking his paw away with my pencil. "It seems more like the ow! of Pooh," said Pooh, rubbing his paw. "Well, its not," I replied huffily. "What's it about?" asked Pooh, leaning forward and smearing another word. "It's about how to stay happy and calm under all circumstances!" I yelled. "Have you read it?" asked Pooh. That was after some of us were discussing the Great Masters of Wisdom, and someone was saying how all of them came from the East, and I was saying that some of them didn't, but he was going on and on, just like this sentence, not paying any attention, when I decided to read a quotation of Wisdom from the West, to prove that there was more to the world than one half, and I read: "When you first wake up in the morning, Pooh," said Piglet at last, "what's the first thing you say to yourself?" "What's for breakfast?" said Pooh. "What do you say, Piglet?" "I say, I wonder what's going to happen exciting today?" said Piglet. Pooh nodded thoughtfully. "It's the same thing," he said. "What's that?" the Unbeliever asked. "Wisdom from a Western Taoist," I said. "It sounds like something from Winnie-the-Pooh," he said. "It is," I said. "That's not about Taoism," he said. "Oh, yes it is," I said. "No, it's not," he said. "What do you think it's about?" I said. "Its about this dumpy little bear that wanders around asking silly questions, making up songs, and going through all kinds of adventures, without ever accumulating any amount of intellectual knowledge or losing his simpleminded sort of happiness. That's what it's about," he said. "Same thing," I said. That was when I began to get an idea: to write a book that explained the principles of Taoism through Winnie-the-Pooh, and explained Winnie-the-Pooh through the principles of Taoism. When informed of my intentions, the scholars exclaimed, "Preposterous!" and things like that. Others said it was the stupidest thing they'd ever heard, and that I must be dreaming. Some said it was a nice idea, but too difficult. "Just where would you even begin?" they asked. Well, and old Taoist saying puts it this way: "A thousand-mile journey starts with one step." So I think that we will start in the beginning...


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