Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Grounding EE Session Guidelines Mobile phones Off Listen to others Respect other peoples Idea. If you feel you want to walk out just do it. Correspond.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Grounding EE Session Guidelines Mobile phones Off Listen to others Respect other peoples Idea. If you feel you want to walk out just do it. Correspond."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Grounding EE

3 Session Guidelines Mobile phones Off Listen to others Respect other peoples Idea. If you feel you want to walk out just do it. Correspond to the facilitators guidance. Take good care of the session room.

4 Learning opportunities Hands-on aspects of academic writing. Analysis of writing to check for academic honesty. Formatting references. Planning timelines. Formatting a large document

5 Program TimeActivitiesObjectives IntroductionUnderstand the participant expectations Introductory activity Academic WritingProcess of academic writing Tea Break 10: Academic HonestyIdentify ways of avoiding or detection plagiarism 12: APAExplore the requirements of APA ReferencingHow to write References Lunch Break InformationUnderstanding the EE Process Way ForwardExploring the Time Lines ClosureEvaluation Hand-On Formatting Exercise How to Format Document

6 Why Evidence Ideas, opinions, beliefs, and theories abound. You merely need to stand around at a party to hear how everyone has an opinion about anything under discussion: politics, religion, the new TV season, Star Wars (movie or defense system), the skill (or lack of skill) of any team in any sport. Sometimes these discussions can reach a volume level only found in overpopulated animal shelters or auto wrecking yards. However, how many of them are worthy of respect? How many should you agree with? For example, someone may say, "Women are inferior." Do you agree? Disagree? Why? Inferior how? Inferior to what? Define inferior. Define women. All women? Some women? Your mother? Your sister? Who says? What is their motive for saying that? What makes them think so? Why should you agree with them? Did they answer any of these questions? Finally, when you hear the sentence, "Women are inferior," do you ask yourself these questions? Do you ask any of these questions? Why? More, if you didn't, why not? If you did ask the questions, congratulations: you're using your head for something besides keeping your ears apart. If you didn't, don't feel bad--you're like the majority who don't think about what they don't think about (why not? They don't thi nk about it). Evidence is also the key to understanding your subject. A way to understand something is to break it down into its component parts, examine each one, and put it back together. Taflinger (1996)

7 What do we think? Think Pair Share

8 What is our Reaction ?

9 Writing All similar letter to sit together. You will be provided with an article to read and make meaning of the information. Discuss in your respective groups (20 minutes) Switch to the matching words and form groups. You will be made up of specialist from each area. Discuss your specialization.

10 Introduction This is a good example of an introduction because it has a topic sentence which indicates what will be covered and also tells the reader the specific focus of the review in the concluding sentence. Notice how the student has clearly said WHAT she will cover in this review. This is particularly important in a large topic area.

11 Paragraphs A paragraph is a group of connected sentences that develop a single point, argument or idea. Paragraphs need to link to other paragraphs so that the themes, arguments or ideas developed are part of a coherent whole rather than separate bits. A paragraph should include: a main statement / idea that you are putting forward, ie topic sentence evidence from research to support / argue your idea, showing where the writers agree and / or disagree

12 Paragraphs cont… student analysis of the research where appropriate summing up and linking to the next idea (paragraph). In the review, you will need to show evidence of integrating your readings into each paragraph and analysis of the readings where necessary.

13 Integrating arguments in paragraphs Integration of multiple sources Integration of student analysis

14 Integration of multiple sources To develop an integrated argument from multiple sources, you need to link your arguments together. The model below is a guide.

15 Integration of student analysis It is important to integrate your analysis and interpretation of the literature in your literature review. Read the following paragraph and see how the arguments have been integrated into the paragraph along with student analysis. Analysis is not just student opinion, it needs to be supported by the literature.

16 Verbs for referencing To incorporate quotations / references into your writing, you can use a variety of verbs. These verbs are often used with prepositions, e.g. that, by, on. It is poor writing to use the same ones all the time, e.g. says that, states that. Verbs also allow the writer to indicate the degree to which they support the author of the research, e.g. claims that versus argues that. The following verbs (and prepositions) can be used to introduce references into your writing. Please note that they can be used in different tenses. acknowledges interprets adds investigates (the impacts of) advises leaves us with advocates lists allows maintains analyzes notes answers objects appreciates observes argues offers asserts opposes believes points out calls points to charges presents cites presents __ aimed at claims proposes clarifies puts forward (the idea/work…) concludes recalls considers recognizes criticizes recommends declares regards defines remarks demonstrates replies describes responds disagrees reveals discuses reverberated by embraces says emphasizes seems to examines sees the use of explains states explores studied the __ of expresses submits finds suggests holds ( the view) supports identifies ___ traces___ to/from implies tells us includes thinks indicates uses worked with/on

17 Referencing as evidence You are required to reference your sources as evidence of your academic integrity. Failing to cite your sources is plagiarism. Referencing is very important when: paraphrasing and summarizing the ideas / words / works of others quoting directly from a source. You must follow the instructions in your EE Students Guide.

18 Poor writing Poor writing in a literature review is often the result of failing to integrate arguments into the review. Many people make the mistake of simply summarizing their readings. Look at the following example of poor writing. The student here has simply reported each author's theory without any analysis or integration. Remember what a literature review is not. A literature review is not just a summary of articles, texts or journals. A literature review is not an analytical, opinionative or argumentative essay. show

19 Poor writing Poor writing in a literature review is often the result of failing to integrate arguments into the review. Many people make the mistake of simply summarizing their readings. Look at the following example of poor writing. The student here has simply reported each author's theory without any analysis or integration. Remember what a literature review is not. A literature review is not just a summary of articles, texts or journals. A literature review is not an analytical, opinionative or argumentative essay.

20 Good writing it integrates the research of various authors it shows similarities and differences of ideas it shows wide reading it shows analysis and critical evaluation of what the student has read.

21 Example — analysis of a paragraph

22 Academic Honesty Honesty What ? Why ? How ? Open discussion

23 Plagiarism “I found your speech to be good and original. However, the part that was original was not good and the part that was good was not original. Samuel Johnson

24 What is plagiarism? (And why you should care!)

25 Definition: Plagiarism is using the words, ideas, images, sounds, or the creative expression of others without giving them credit, and then saying that it is your own

26 The Importance of Being Ethical Not giving credit for your sources is like robbing the authors of payment for their original work and robbing them of the recognition they deserve for their work You are also lying to your reader by claiming other people’s work as your own

27 How serious is the problem? McAbe, in his study of almost 4,500 students at 25 schools suggests, cheating is... a significant problem in high school - 74% of the respondents admitted to one or more instances of serious test cheating and 72% admitted to serious cheating on written assignments. Over half of the students admitted they have engaged in some level of plagiarism on written assignments using the Internet (p.1) cheating.jpg

28 DP 1, if…  you have copied and pasted text or pictures from the Internet without listing the source in your references  you are using another CP’s or your parents’ work and claiming it as your own, even with their permission.  you are quoting a source without using quotation marks – even if you do cite it  you are citing sources you didn’t use  you are getting a research paper, story poem or article off the Internet  you are turning in the same paper for more than one course without the permission of both facilitators, (this is called self- plagiarism)

29 Excuses It’s okay if I don’t get caught! I was too busy to write that paper! (Job, big game, too much school work!) My facilitators expect too much! I’ve got to get into ??? U.! My parents expect “A”s! This assignment was BORING! Everyone does it!

30 Think about it! When you copy you cheat yourself. You limit your own learning. The consequences are not worth the risks! It is only right to give credit to authors whose ideas you use Citing gives authority to the information you present; your teacher is impressed because it shows you have done your research Citing makes it possible for your readers to locate your source Education is not an “us vs. them” game! It’s about learning to learn! Cheating is unethical behavior Is your academic reputation valuable to you?

31 Real life consequences: Kaaya Viswanathan's novel How Opal Mehta Got Wild, Got Kissed and Got a Life Picture: Joe Raedle/Getty Images Consequences: Promising young author with a $500, book deal and a movie deal with Stephen Spielberg loses all! Consequences: Promising young author with a $500, book deal and a movie deal with Stephen Spielberg loses all! Kaavya Viswanathan, a gifted Harvard student, came to public attention when her debut novel was reveled to have been plagiarized

32 Real life : The Chiffons, one of the most definitive “girl groups” of the 60’s. Album cover: Amazon.com Consequences: George had to pay $587, to settle the court case filed against him Consequences: George had to pay $587, to settle the court case filed against him George Harrison unintentionally copied portions of his hit “My Sweet Lord” from the song “He’s so fine” by the Chiffons sonsalmanac.com/images 2/harrison_g2.jpg

33 Real life : Photo from WashingtonSp eakersBureau, 2005 Consequences: Mike Barnicle, considered a top journalist, was fired from his job at the Boston Globe Consequences: Mike Barnicle, considered a top journalist, was fired from his job at the Boston Globe Boston Globe Journalist Mike Barnicle was found to have plagiarized a number of his newspaper articles

34 Is this important? What if… > Your architect cheated his way through math class. Will your new home be safe? > Your lawyer paid for a copy of the bar exam to study. Will the contract she wrote for you stand up in court? > The accountant who does your taxes hired someone to write his papers and paid a stand-in to take his major tests? Does he know enough to complete your tax forms properly? (Lathrop &Foss, 2000, p.87)

35 Original text from Elaine Tyler May’s Myths and Realities of the American Family: Because women’s wages often continue to reflect the fiction that men earn the family wage, single mothers rarely earn enough to support themselves and their children adequately. And because work is still organized around the assumption that mothers stay home with children, even though few mothers can afford to do so, child care facilities in the United States remain woefully inadequate. ( )

36 How do you detect plagiarism Word for word Paraphrasing Each desk to read the case given and note the key information presented

37 What does it mean? The work you produce is based on your own ideas, using your own language and expression and respects intellectual property. You may include ideas and works of others if you appropriately mention the source.

38 How can I become academically honest? You may collaborate with fellow course participants but the work must be produced independently Use a standard referencing such as APA If you are uncertain in terms of referencing seek advice from your supervisor Respond honestly to the supervisor if questioned about the integrity of your work

39 APA What is it

40 How can I be an ‘honest student researcher’?

41 How do I reference?

42 When using books: Authors last name and initial. (Year of publication). Book title. City of Publication: Publisher.

43 When using encyclopedia or other reference work: Author. (Year). Title (italics) (Vol) pp (page numbers). City, Publishers

44 When using magazine articles: Author‘s last name and initial (s). (Date of publication). Article title. Journal Title, volume number, pages of the entire article.

45 When using a Web document: List as much of the following information as possible. (You sometimes have to hunt around to find the information. Try going to the bottom of the page, ‘home’ page, or ‘about us’). Basic format: Author. (Date of Web site). Web page title. Retrieved (give date), from (give name) Web site: url (no period at end)

46 When using NON-PRINT ELECTRONIC IMAGES Author (Role of Author). (Year image was created). Title of work [Type of work], Retrieved Month Day, Year, from URL (address of website)

47 Referencing Let us do it now Presentation

48 Information

49 Basic Facts Personal research by the student On a question or hypothesis chosen by the student, not assigned by the teacher In a subject or discipline listed by the IB (e.g., NOT Linguistics, Sociology or Mathematical Economics) In the format of a formal research paper

50 Basic Facts Length 4,000 words not including appendices, illustrations, bibliography, footnotes or endnotes with an abstract within 300 words

51 Basic Facts Required for the IB Diploma Counts towards additional diploma points along with Theory of Knowledge Assessed according to published criteria

52 WHO IS INVOLVED IN THE EXTENDED ESSAY? The student The student’s supervisor The EE Coordinator The IB Coordinator The International Baccalaureate Organization

53 HOW TO CHOOSE A RESEARCH TOPIC Decide which subject interests you the most. Without personal curiosity and interest, it’s impossible to do research.

54 In that subject, make a list of the topical areas in the subject that interest you the most.

55 HOW TO CHOOSE A RESEARCH TOPIC Discuss this list with your teacher your friends your parents and/or anyone else who you think may be able to give you advice or be interested.

56 Choose an area from this list, and read more in this area - if possible, with advice from your supervisor.

57 HOW TO CHOOSE A RESEARCH TOPIC While reading, try and list questions that you are curious about. THIS MUST BE DONE RIGHT THROUGH THE RESEARCH PROCESS, SO....

58 Keep a Plan Gantt Chart Gantt Chart will do Researchers log will help

59 HOW TO CHOOSE A RESEARCH TOPIC Ask yourself what data you might need to answer these questions whether you will have access to the data whether you will need to find other sources of data How will you handle the data See whether there has been any research by others in this area.

60 Consult the librarian for help with tracking down research papers or writings, and read the abstracts.

61 Ask what methods you will need to adopt to answer the questions you have in mind.

62 HOW TO CHOOSE A RESEARCH TOPIC Brainstorm Draw spider diagrams of questions and issues and connections between them.

63 HOW TO CHOOSE A RESEARCH TOPIC Narrow down the number and scope of your questions as you proceed.

64 Consult your supervisor at each stage, and in case of difficulty.

65 EXPECT TO CHANGE YOUR MIND SEVERAL TIMES BEFORE YOU FINALLY SETTLE ON A TOPIC.

66 WHAT IS A GOOD RESEARCH QUESTION? One formulated by the student out of his/her own curiosity or interest Non-trivial (i.e., substantial, not speculative or too limited in scope, not self- evident) Sharply enough focused so that the student can answer it in 4,000 words.

67 ECONOMICS Does globalization affect Turkey?

68 BIOLOGY What causes cancer?

69 HISTORY What would have happened to Turkey if the last Sultans had been more powerful?

70 GEOGRAPHY Does Istanbul have a central business district? (variant of an example in The Extended Essay, IBO, 1998)

71 ECONOMICS Is there a connection between international coffee prices and living standards in Uganda?

72 BIOLOGY The ecology of snails in the Koç School campus.

73 HISTORY The establishment of foreign schools in Turkey in the 19 th century

74 GEOGRAPHY How has migration affected land use patterns in Van province?

75 Students discover too late that there is too little data, or data is inaccessible. COMMON PROBLEMS WITH EXTENDED ESSAYS

76 Bad pacing of the research and writing process COMMON PROBLEMS WITH EXTENDED ESSAYS

77 PLAGIARISM The use of the work of other authors (texts, data, creative productions, oral statements OR ideas) without proper acknowledgement, with the effect that it appears to be the plagiarist’s own work or idea.

78 Over-reliance on web-based sources. Assessing the web sources on the same day

79 Students discover too late that their knowledge of the subject is not deep enough.

80 Ethical issues regarding gathering of data or performing of experiments

81 No contribution by the student – the extended essay is a compilation of information from other sources.

82 Advisory Session Towards the end IBDP1 Where you should be in the process now. What you need to do if you are not there. Possible problems at this stage, and what to do about them. Tips and pitfalls Discussion with subject teachers and librarian.

83 Where should you be in the EE process by MAY? You should have: Assembled the material and bibliography for your research Performed experiments (where required) Recorded data or observations on which your research is based. Written up research notes Outlined your analysis Started writing the Second proposal

84 What you need to do if you are not there Decide whether you still want the IB diploma. If you do… Show your supervisor what you have done Ask for advice. Spend more time on the EE research process to complete what needs to be done up to the second draft. Submit a second draft with what you have, and try and improve on it AFTER it is returned to you with your supervisor’s comments.

85 What you SHOULD NOT do if you are not there DON’T PANIC! Don’t give up. No extended essay means NO IB DIPLOMA. Don’t PROCRASTINATE and DELAY, or pretend that the problem will go away.

86 Possible Problems at this Stage 1 You have not focused your research question appropriately for the size of the essay or the discipline. The direction of your research may be contrary to the guidelines. You have not identified resources for answering your research question. You have not completed readings or experiments or the gathering of data for your research.

87 Possible Problems at this Stage 2 You find it difficult to organize, analyze or interpret the material or data required for your research. You find the material is insufficient or inconclusive for your research. You feel you don’t know enough in the discipline to be able to complete your research.

88 If you have not focused your research question appropriately for the size of the essay or the discipline… Remember that your research question needs to be addressed in 4,000 words. Remember that the essay has to be firmly in one of the disciplines taught in the IB, e.g., English, History, Peace & Conflict Studies; but not Cultural Studies, Mathematical Economics, etc. Seek your supervisor’s guidance. Relate your essay to a specific thing, such as a novel, country, time, effect, law. The Ecology of Snails in the Koç School Campus is better than The Ecology of Turkey.

89 If the direction of your research is contrary to the guidelines… Check carefully from the Extended Essay Guide what the criteria for your essay are. Refocus the question and start again. (It may be too late to do this, so…) Complete the essay as you have started to the best of your ability, and hope for the best! Remember that NO ESSAY MEANS NO IB DIPLOMA.

90 If you have not identified all necessary resources… Tell your supervisor, and ask for advice. Seek help from the librarian to find various sources of information and/or ideas. Find people or institutions outside school that may be able to help you, and approach them.

91 If you have not completed readings or gathering data… Submit a draft on the basis of what is available, and try to improve in the following draft. OR Complete the readings or data collection in time for your second draft.

92 If you find it difficult to organize, analyze or interpret the material or data required for your research… Seek your supervisor’s advice. Consider whether you need to re-word or re-think your research question. Look for theoretical frameworks or tools in your discipline that can help you analyze or interpret the material you have available.

93 If you find the material is inconclusive for your research… Speak to your supervisor. Re-examine the material and see whether you are missing something. Re-examine the theoretical “spectacles” with which you are viewing the material. Examine why it is inconclusive as part of the analysis and discussion in your essay.

94 If you feel you don’t know enough in the discipline to be able to complete your research… Seek help from your supervisor to find out what ideas, concepts, frameworks, tools or techniques will help you address the research question. Read more in the discipline in which you are doing the research. Seek help from professors or graduate students at universities to teach you what you need to know. (Your supervisor will probably not teach you, but may help you teach yourself. )

95 TIPS AND PITS Tips: Make sure your question is narrowly focused. It helps to exceed by about 20-30% the word limit in the first few drafts, and cut it back to the maximum of 4,000 for the final. Keep assessing each draft of your essay against the General and Subject Criteria in the Extended Essay Guide, or ask your supervisor to do so. Record ALL sources that you consult and use, and cite them carefully.

96 TIPS AND PITS More Tips: Keep a Research Diary or Journal or Notebook, especially a pocket-sized one that you can carry about and record any ideas that occur to you anywhere. Frequently draw spider diagrams to get the bigger picture, and make links that you know of, and look for other possible links that you may have missed. Make sure that you present, analyze and interpret data – not just present them! Use the technical vocabulary and concepts of the discipline in which you are working - don’t write like a journalist.

97 TIPS AND PITS STILL more tips: Remember that if you give up on the essay, you still need to hand in a Yearly Project, and you disqualify yourself from the IB Diploma. So… Complete the essay as best you can, even if you run into problems. That way you will have learnt something valuable! Write the Introduction LAST, so that you can give the reader a clear statement of the research question, and how you have addressed it (a “roadmap” of the essay).

98 TIPS AND PITS Pitfalls: Don’t neglect to refer to BOTH sections of your Extended Essay Guide FREQUENTLY. DON’T leave everything till the last. The deadlines for drafts are there to help you pace your work. They are not a monument to my alleged sadism! Do NOT rely entirely or mostly on web based resources because of they often tend to be unreliable.

99 TIPS AND PITS MORE Pitfalls KEEP BACK-UPS (note the plural) OF ALL YOUR WORK. You will be surprised how well your computer knows when to crash. KEEP BACK-UPS (note the plural) OF ALL YOUR WORK. You will be surprised how well your computer knows when to crash. BEWARE OF PLAGIARISM (especially the unintentional kind)! The consequences are UNPLEASANT. BEWARE OF PLAGIARISM (especially the unintentional kind)! The consequences are UNPLEASANT.

100 HELPFUL WEBSITES WC/index.html WC/index.html MIT Writing Centre. Many of the pages here have restricted access. This is a comprehensive guide to writing research papers which also contains the MLA style guide whose citation conventions you to adopt in writing your essay. In addition, it also contains sections on plagiarism and citation. say/Extended%20Essay%20Intro.db_psc?verb= view This is a digital library that address many issues concerning how to undertake EE. say/Extended%20Essay%20Intro.db_psc?verb= view

101 Timelines

102 AspectStartTime Literature review Time management10/6/20097 Pre Deworming Preparations -Literature review, data collection tools10/20/ Mini Sessions on Research Skills, Formatting, Referencing based on Deworming Project11/3/ Mini research proposals1/26/ Group Presentations2/2/20101 Group Presentations2/17/20101 Group Presentations2/24/20101 Group Presentations3/2/20101 Group Presentations3/9/20101 Group Presentations3/17/20101 Final Report Mini Research3/23/20101

103 AspectStartTime EE 2 ND Proposal form and consultation 5/11/ Work on first draft 5/12/ First draft to supervisor 6/15/ First draft Returned to the Students 6/29/ Work on second draft 7/1/ Summer Plan to the supervisor 7/20/2010 finding to the supervisor 9/7/ First draft to supervisor 10/1/ Final copy to supervisor 11/1/ Viva Voce (Supervisor and EEC or IBC) 11/8/2010 7

104 AspectStartTime Final Edited copy uploaded to the server 1/15/ Final Draft to be Printed upon student confirmation a second copy to be printed and handed in to IBC 2/15/ Predicted Grade3/1/20115

105

106 AspectStartTime Final Edited copy uploaded to the server 1/15/ Final Draft to be Printed upon student confirmation a second copy to be printed and handed in to IBC 2/15/ Predicted Grade3/1/20115

107

108 Down load the documents Ethics in Research from the link com Edit the document according to the APA guidelines. Print it out.


Download ppt "Grounding EE Session Guidelines Mobile phones Off Listen to others Respect other peoples Idea. If you feel you want to walk out just do it. Correspond."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google