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4647 Lesson 18. 4849 Lesson 18 – continued Page 47 Lesson 18 The Road to the White House.

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Presentation on theme: "4647 Lesson 18. 4849 Lesson 18 – continued Page 47 Lesson 18 The Road to the White House."— Presentation transcript:

1 4647 Lesson 18

2 4849 Lesson 18 – continued

3 Page 47 Lesson 18 The Road to the White House

4 W ARM- U P Lesson 18: The Road to the White House List the different ways a person MAY become the President of the United States. L 46 List the different ways the office of the Presidency MAY become vacant. E SSENTIAL Q UESTION: How is the power of the Executive Branch maintained AND transferred?

5  I can list the main two ways a person may become the President of the United States.  I can explain the Electoral College’s role in selecting the President. 47 R L EARNING T ARGETS:  I can explain the process of presidential succession.  popular vote  electoral vote  presidential succession VOCAB Key Vocabulary to add to Flashcard List (35-37) Lesson 18: The Road to the White House

6 C LASS N OTES What are the Qualifications to be the President? 47 R How many presidents have we had? We have had 44 presidencies with 43 people being sworn in as president. The youngest person to be president? Youngest “elected” was John F. Kennedy, who was 43 years old, BUT the youngest person ever to be the president was Theodore Roosevelt. The oldest person to be president? The oldest was Ronald Reagan, who was elected at age 77. How are you REALLY elected to the Presidency? Lesson 18: The Road to the White House How to Reach the White House I.Elected to the office of the President

7 Attach the Reading on “Could You Win the Election and Lose?” Imagine this: It is election night, and you are one of the two major candidates for President. As the votes come in, it looks as if you will win. IT HAPPENS! You get more votes than any other candidate. But as your supporters go wild with excitement, you get bad news. Even though you won the most popular votes, you will not be the next President. Your opponent, who came in second, has won the election! How Could It Happen? Could this happen? It already has – four times in our nation’s history. The last time was in 2000, when Senator Al Gore, a Democrat, beat his Republican opponent, George W. Bush. But Bush, who lost election day, became the next President because he got a majority of votes in the Electoral College. The Electoral College When Americans go to the polls on election day, they do not actually vote for President and Vice President. Instead, when they vote for a candidate, they are actually choosing electors who support that candidate. In each state and the District of Columbia, the chosen electors meet in mid-December to cast their ballots for President and Vice President. The electoral votes are counted by the U.S. House of Representatives in January. The candidate who wins a majority (270) of the 538 electoral votes is elected President, no matter who got the most popular (of the public) votes. How Winners Can Lose How can a candidate win the most popular votes – but still lose in the electoral voting? Each state has as many electors as it has U.S. Senators (two) and Representatives (the number depends on the state’s population). The District of Columbia has three votes. In nearly all states, the candidate who gets the most popular votes gets all of the state’s electoral votes. Result: A candidate can win by a small margin in states that have many electoral votes – and defeat the candidate who gets the most popular votes nationwide. That is what happened in 2000, 1888, and Why Have This System? The electoral-college system is spelled out in the U.S. Constitution. The men who wrote the Constitution did not want to put the choice of President into the hands of the people. They did not think that the average person had enough knowledge to make such a decision. So they came up with the Electoral College. (In this case, college means a group of people named to perform a duty.) They expected that each state would choose electors from among its leading citizens. However, today, each political party elects the electors for its candidate. So, rather than “leading citizens” making the final choice of President and Vice President, that decision is made by whoever each party chooses. Some Americans want to abolish the Electoral College. They say that the people should elect the President directly. Why have a system in which the people’s choice can lose? But other Americans want to keep the system. They say that it keeps candidates from ignoring less- populous states and regions. If the President were chosen by direct popular vote, candidates might concentrate on states with the largest populations and ignore others. LOSE? THE ELECTION AND WIN COULD YOU L 48 Lesson 18: The Road to the White House

8 Attach and complete the Handout on “The Electoral College in Action Example Problem” The Electoral College in Action EXAMPLE PROBLEM To keep this example of the Electoral College simple, assume that there are only five states in the United States. Pennsylvania STATE POPULAR VOTE DEMOCRAT POPULAR VOTE REPUBLICAN ELECTORAL VOTES New York New Jersey Use the table above to answer the following questions. 7,000,000 6,000,001 5,000,000 8,000,000 6,000,000 4,000, Maryland Delaware 2,000,000 10,000 2,000,001 3,000, What was the total number of POPULAR VOTES that the Democratic candidate for President received? 2.What was the total number of POPULAR VOTES that the Republican candidate for President received? 3.What was the total number of ELECTORAL VOTES that the Democratic candidate for President received? 4.What was the total number of ELECTORAL VOTES that the Republican candidate for President received? 5.Which set of votes determines who will become President? 6.Which candidate won the POPULAR vote in the example? 7.Which candidate won the ELECTORAL vote in the example? 8.Which candidate will be elected President of the United States? 49 R Lesson 18: The Road to the White House

9 Review the Example Problem 1. What was the total number of POPULAR VOTES that the Democratic candidate for President received? 20,010,001 votes 2. What was the total number of POPULAR VOTES that the Republican candidate for President received? 23,000,001 votes 3. What was the total number of ELECTORAL VOTES that the Democratic candidate for President received? 46 electoral votes 4. What was the total number of ELECTORAL VOTES that the Republican candidate for President received? 34 electoral votes Lesson 18: The Road to the White House

10 Review the Example Problem 5. Which set of votes determines who will become President? The electoral votes 6. Which candidate won the POPULAR vote in the example? The Republican candidate 7. Which candidate won the ELECTORAL vote in the example? The Democratic candidate 8. Which candidate will be elected President of the United States? The Democratic candidate Lesson 18: The Road to the White House

11 I.Elected to the Office of the President A.The Electoral College (Article II, Section 1, paragraphs 2 and 4) 1.The Electoral College has 538 votes 2.Each state receives the number of electoral votes equal to the number they have in Congress (plus 3 for Washington, D.C. according to the 23 rd Amendment) 3.Every state (state legislature) decides HOW their electors will serve a.Maine and Nebraska split, the rest “winner-take-all” 4.Today, with 538 electoral votes, a candidate needs 270 electoral votes to be declared the winner C LASS N OTES WHAT IF there is a tie OR no candidate receives 270 votes ? 47 R Lesson 18: The Road to the White House How to Reach the White House

12 5.If there is a tie OR no candidate receives 270 votes, the House of Representatives decides 1.YES, twice! a.In 1800, Thomas Jefferson versus Aaron Burr b.In 1824, John Quincy Adams versus Andrew Jackson Has THAT ever happened? C LASS N OTES 47 R Lesson 18: The Road to the White House How to Reach the White House

13 II.Presidential Succession (Article II, Section 1, paragraph 6) A.If the office of the President becomes vacant, FIRST the Vice President 1.9 times (4 deaths, 4 assassinations, 1 resignation) John Tyler (1841) – death of William Henry Harrison Millard Fillmore (1850) – death of Zachary Taylor Andrew Johnson (1865) – assassination of Abraham Lincoln Chester Arthur (1881) – assassination of James Garfield Theodore Roosevelt (1901) – assassination of William McKinley Calvin Coolidge (1923) – death of Warren Harding Harry Truman (1945) – death of Franklin Roosevelt Lyndon B. Johnson (1963) – assassination of John F. Kennedy Gerald Ford (1974) – resignation of Richard Nixon C LASS N OTES Has THAT ever happened? 47 R Lesson 18: The Road to the White House How to Reach the White House

14 II.Presidential Succession (Article II, Section 1, paragraph 6) A.If the office of the President becomes vacant, FIRST the Vice President 1.9 times (4 deaths, 4 assassinations, 1 resignation) 2.25 th Amendment B.Speaker of the House C.President pro tempore of the Senate D.Cabinet members in order of the cabinet’s creation C LASS N OTES The 25 th amendment allows for the Vice President to become president in the event of death, resignation, removal from office, or impairment that prevents the current president from fulfilling his or her duties. The new President is to appoint a replacement Vice President. 47 R Lesson 18: The Road to the White House How to Reach the White House

15 Current Order of Succession – March The Vice President Joseph Biden (D) 2.Speaker of the House John Boehner (R) 3.President pro tempore of the Senate Orrin Hatch (R) 4.Secretary of State John Kerry (D) 5.Secretary of the Treasury Jack Lew (D) 6.Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel (R) 7.Attorney General Eric Holder, Jr. (D) Secretary of the Interior*Sally Jewel (D) 8.Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack (D) 9.Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker (D) 10.Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez (D) 11.Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Mathews Burwell (D) 12.Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julian Castro (D) 13.Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx (D) 14.Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz (D) 15.Secretary of Education Arne Duncan (D) 16.Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert McDonald (R) 17.Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson (D) Lesson 18: The Road to the White House

16 II.Presidential Succession (Article II, Section 1, paragraph 6) A.If the office of the President becomes vacant, FIRST the Vice President 1.9 times (4 deaths, 4 assassinations, 1 resignation) 2.25 th Amendment B.Speaker of the House C.President pro tempore of the Senate D.Cabinet members in order of the cabinet’s creation E.C.O.G. – “Continuity of Government” The plan to maintain the operation of our government in a catastrophic situation History Channel – “The Day after Disaster” video C LASS N OTES 47 R Lesson 18: The Road to the White House How to Reach the White House

17 Processing the Lesson What is the FEWEST states needed to be elected the President of the United States? L 46 Lesson 18: The Road to the White House

18 Processing the Lesson What is the FEWEST states needed to be elected the President of the United States? Source: 11 States CA – 55 TX – 38 (34) NY – 29 (31) FL – 29 (27) PA – 20 (21) IL – 20 (21) OH – 18 (20) MI – 16 (17) NJ – 14 (15) NC – 15 GA – 16 (15) L 46 Lesson 18: The Road to the White House

19 Y OU D ECIDE ! The Electoral College System? E DMODO Should the Electoral College system be kept or eliminated? Why? L 46 Lesson 18: The Road to the White House


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