Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Priority Areas for Conservation of Biodiversity in Brazilian Amazon.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Priority Areas for Conservation of Biodiversity in Brazilian Amazon."— Presentation transcript:

1 Priority Areas for Conservation of Biodiversity in Brazilian Amazon

2 History First Map of Brazilian Government was made in 1999 For all biomes simultaneously (different teams) Based entirely in expert knowledge

3 Method: thematic maps summed

4 Importance Presidential Decree signed in 2004 – More rigourous criteria for licencing – Updates should be made in up to 10 years or when new data or methodology justifies reviewing

5

6 Update November 2005 – Workshop for Methodology December 2005 – Approval of Methodology by CONABIO 2006 – Updates for all biomes (Amazonia, Pantanal, Caatinga, Cerrado, Mata Atlântica e Pampa) – For the Amazon biome the process started in August

7 Planning process in Amazon Stage 1. Scoping and costing the planning process Stage 2. Identifying and involving stakeholders Stage 3. Identifying the context for conservation areas Stage 4. Identifying conservation goals Stage 5. Gathering and evaluating data Stage 6. Setting conservation targets Stage 7. Reviewing target achievement in existing conservation areas Stage 8. Selecting additional conservation areas Stage 9. Implementing conservation action Stage 10. Maintaining and monitoring established conservation areas

8 Planning process in Brazil Stage 1. Scoping and costing the planning process Stage 2. Identifying and involving stakeholders Stage 3. Identifying the context for conservation areas Stage 4. Identifying conservation goals Stage 5. Gathering and evaluating data Stage 6. Setting conservation targets Stage 7. Reviewing target achievement in existing conservation areas Stage 8. Selecting additional conservation areas Stage 9. Implementing conservation action Stage 10. Maintaining and monitoring established conservation areas

9 Scoping and Goals Boundaries: 2004 IBGE map of biomes Coordination by MMA Conservation and Sustainable Use Strong stakeholder participation Features and targets defined independently for each biome

10 Planning process in Amazon Stage 1. Scoping and costing the planning process Stage 2. Identifying and involving stakeholders Stage 3. Identifying the context for conservation areas Stage 4. Identifying conservation goals Stage 5. Gathering and evaluating data Stage 6. Setting conservation targets Stage 7. Reviewing target achievement in existing conservation areas Stage 8. Selecting additional conservation areas Stage 9. Implementing conservation action Stage 10. Maintaining and monitoring established conservation areas

11 Involving Stakeholders & Gathering Information Lists of participants and logistics were made by ARPA ARPA is the Protected Areas Program for Amazon region – It supports 57 Protected Areas in Amazon, by funding infrastructure and monitoring programs – It also helps to create and implementing new areas

12 Involving Stakeholders & Gathering Information People from Academic institutions, Government, NGOs and other civil organizations Invited to participate and to bring relevant information Invited to choose in which stages they would like to be involved

13 BASEFONTE/PROP FUNÇÂO NO PROCESSO Biomas BrasileirosIBGE Define a área de trabalho Terras IndígenasFUNAI UP Unidades de ConservaçãoMMA Espécies Primatas e LagartosCI Distribuição de espécies Ecorregiões (PROBIO)MMA Definição de unidade ambiental Ecorregioes_WWF2006WWF Sistemas EcologicosTNC/NATURESERVE Geomorfologia, geologia, vegetação e solos (1: )SIPAM Vegetação, geomorfologia, geologia, solos (1: )IBGE/CSR-IBAMA Base de vegetação consolidada em 34 classes (1: )Bruce Nelson INPA Chuva anual 1x1 kmWORLDCLIM Duração e intensidade da estação seca na Amazônia Legal (Walsh)Bruce Nelson INPA Relevo 1x1 kmSRTM/WORLDCLIM Temperatura mínima anual 1x1 kmWORLDCLIM Hidrografia (1: )SIPAM Sistemas aquáticos Hidrografia (1: )ANA Bacias e Sub baciasANA Hydrosheds_2006WWF Cenários AmeaçasB. Soares UFMG Análise de ameaça Densidade Demográfica (Localidades IBGE)TNC Densidade demográfica (Imagem de luzes noturnas)NOAA EstradasIBGE Hidrelétricas atuais e planejadasANEEL Remanescentes florestaisMMA-PROBIO Análise de integridade Áreas Prioritárias – Consulta MacapáMMA Demandas a serem avaliadas nos Seminários Regionais Demanda de extrativistas para a criação de áreas de uso sustentávelISA Proposta de criação de Ucs em várzea ao longo do Amazonas/SolimõesPROVARZEA Biota ParáMUSEU GOELDI-CI Espécies endêmicas do Pará, a serem analisadas no Seminário Regional

14 Planning process in Amazon Stage 1. Scoping and costing the planning process Stage 2. Identifying and involving stakeholders Stage 3. Identifying the context for conservation areas Stage 4. Identifying conservation goals Stage 5. Gathering and evaluating data Stage 6. Setting conservation targets Stage 7. Reviewing target achievement in existing conservation areas Stage 8. Selecting additional conservation areas Stage 9. Implementing conservation action Stage 10. Maintaining and monitoring established conservation areas

15 Planning process in Amazon The first meeting aimed features and target definition – 111 people- about 50% experts, 25% Government and 25% civil organizations (rubber tapper, indigenous, etc) – Aiming to produce an irreplaceability map during the meeting (Monday to Friday).

16 Producing the map 1.Defining features (working groups) To define which features/processes/services should be represented To select better information to represent them To define the best way to combine information when needed General approval about features definition 2.Defining targets (thematic working groups) Discuss criteria for quantification Setting targets 3.Presentation of the map and final discussion

17 Smaller Scientific Meetings At INPA, Museu Goeldi and SBPC Destined to improve target definition Allowed to change targets, but not features included

18

19 Features and Targets Terrestrial habitats Aquatic habitats Species distribution (primates) Sustainable use Processes: endemic centres Services: climate change

20 49 Vegetation types 1:

21 15 Interfluvial Regions Ayres & Clutton Brock 1992; Haffer 1992

22 7 Geology classes (age)

23 Vegetation x Interfluvial regions x Geological Age = 511 habitat types ExtensionTarget Up to ha100% ha70% ha60% > ha40%

24 Features and Targets Terrestrial habitats Aquatic habitats Species distribution (primates) Sustainable use Processes: endemic centres Services: climate change

25 299 Level 3 basins Targets 30% for heads and cascades 20% for others

26 Rivers- buffers of 10 km around main rivers x level 3 basins Target = 60%

27 Features and Targets Terrestrial habitats Aquatic habitats Species distribution (Primates) Sustainable use Processes: endemic centres Services: climate change

28 Primates (95 spp) Only Genus Mico represented Targets 100% 3 million ha 20% Sousa Jr & CI

29 Features and Targets Terrestrial habitats Aquatic habitats Species distribution (primates) Sustainable use Processes: endemic centres Services: climate change

30 3 valuable species (fiber, seed, wood) Target 20%

31 Flooded forests (mostly for fishing) Target 20%

32 Dense forests in flat areas (for forestry) Target 20%

33 Features and Targets Terrestrial habitats Aquatic habitats Species distribution (primates) Sustainable use Processes: endemic centres Services: climate change

34 Endemism Centres- Butterflies Papilionini Tyler, H. A., Brown Junior, K. S. and Wilson, K. H. (1994). Targets Manaus-Guiana 10% Others 15%

35 Endemism Centres- Birds Targets Guiana, Inambari, Rondonia & Tapajós 10% Others 15% Cracraft 1985

36 Features and Targets Terrestrial habitats Aquatic habitats Species distribution (primates) Sustainable use Processes: endemic centres Services: climate change

37 Forest cover in critical area Target 20%

38 Obregon mm < P < 5 mm SACZ Sea Breezes Instability lines Annual Precipitation

39 Salazar et. al 2007

40 Irreplaceability map

41 Best Solution

42 Planning process in Amazon Stage 1. Scoping and costing the planning process Stage 2. Identifying and involving stakeholders Stage 3. Identifying the context for conservation areas Stage 4. Identifying conservation goals Stage 5. Gathering and evaluating data Stage 6. Setting conservation targets Stage 7. Reviewing target achievement in existing conservation areas Stage 8. Selecting additional conservation areas Stage 9. Implementing conservation action Stage 10. Maintaining and monitoring established conservation areas

43 Selection and Context Entirely made by people (without using software) – 2 Regional Meetings (~120 participants each) Participants were Government (~50%), social and environmental organizations (~35%), academic (~15%) – 1 Indigenous meeting (~70 participants) Indigenous representatives (~40%), indigenous organizations (~15%), academic (~20%), and Government (~20%)

44 Selection and Context It was oriented to use irreplaceability map and proposed solution as guidance, and to define IMPORTANCE of selected areas. A map with deforestation model (Soares et al 2006) was suggested as a guidance for threat level, and to help to define URGENCY of implementation of actions Boundaries of selected areas were defined with help of other databases such as basins, cities, towns, and existing protected areas Actions needed were defined based on characteristics of the area, opportunities, and threats. All this information was stored in a databank

45

46

47

48

49 Existing Protected Areas

50 Existing + Proposed Protected Areas

51 Irreplaceability for existing and proposed Protected Areas

52 About the Amazonian planning process Strengths Improvement in targets Participation of many stakeholders Strong involvement of Government Agencies: easyness of approval and better chances of implementation Spreading of knowledge on systematic planning process Understanding of planning as a dynamic process- shortening reviewing time to 5 years Weaknesses Missed important features and included some mistaken ones (e.g. climate change). Poor target definition in some cases. Costs were subjectively included. Weak expert participation in selection phase Decisions based on political forces Low efficiency of selected areas: costly implementation with not much improvement in representativeness Is it possible to improve planning before most of the funds for implementation are spent?

53 GTZ/ARPA and CNPq are supporting my participation


Download ppt "Priority Areas for Conservation of Biodiversity in Brazilian Amazon."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google