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Brian Hansen, BS Tyler Pedersen, PhD Tom Golightly, PhD John Okishi, PhD Counseling and Career Center Brigham Young University April, 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "Brian Hansen, BS Tyler Pedersen, PhD Tom Golightly, PhD John Okishi, PhD Counseling and Career Center Brigham Young University April, 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 Brian Hansen, BS Tyler Pedersen, PhD Tom Golightly, PhD John Okishi, PhD Counseling and Career Center Brigham Young University April, 2011

2 National Depression Screening Day (NDSD): Beginning in 1991, NDSD a major form of community mental health outreach Conducted at more than 3,000 sites across the country each year 625 colleges and universities participate More than 85,000 individuals personally screened At Brigham Young University: 45 hours personal screening 32 hours in housing 24 hours handouts/booth ___________________ 101 clinician hours this year

3 Worth the Cost? Little to no empirical data about effectiveness Demands time from other services Resistance from faculty Accountability to administration What value does outreach provide?

4 NDSD at BYU Counseling Center: BYU: 32,000 students CCC: 26 tenure-track faculty, 20+trainees Nearly every year for 10+ years Advertised via student newspaper, flyers, housing units, courses, bribed with brownies screenings completed by students Personal meeting with licensed therapist/ graduate trainee Screen for PTSD and GAD Referred to counseling services if meet criteria

5 Research Questions: 1. Does NDSD successfully identify students who are in need of counseling services? 2. Do referred students differ from “typical” outpatient students currently receiving therapy in terms of initial severity/other demographic information? 3. Do students who are referred come to treatment? 4. Do students who come to treatment benefit from services? Compared to “typical” individuals seeking treatment?

6 Method: 1. Screen students for NDSD 2. Track all students referred from NDSD to the CCC for therapy 3. Assess initial levels of distress from NDSD referrals 4. Track psychotherapy outcome of NDSD referrals vs. ‘typical’ referrals/patients , 2007, 2008, 2009, OQ-45 completed at intake, each session

7 OQ-45 Symptom Distress (SD): Interpersonal Relations (IR): Social Role (SR): 45-item self-report outcome/tracking instrument designed for repeated measurement of client progress throughout the course of therapy Higher scores indicate high levels of distress (highest possible score = 180) “Normal stress” = Total score of 43.5 “Recovery line” = Total score of 63.5

8 Results: Approximately 20% of those screened are referred for follow-up. Approximately 7- 10% become new clients of the CCC.

9 Treatment Response: Intake total: (t = 4.471, p <.001) SD subscale: (t = 4.832, p <.001) SR subscale: (t = 4.217, p <.001)

10 Change in Distress OQ-45 NDSD clients benefit more from therapy

11 Other Research Questions Earlier results (2007) indicated NDSD participants more likely to be: male, international, married; use more sessions (2) Analysis: Slight difference in gender from typical TAU client NDSD 45% male, 55% female Total sample: 39% male, 61% female No true difference in international status NDSD: 11% international, Total sample: 10 % Slight difference in number of sessions (3.1 vs. 3.8)

12 Previous Summary (05-09):

13 Discussion: Clients who are screened at NDSD and then and attend follow-up therapy are more distressed than our typical clients. NDSD clients experience more improvement than our typical client. NDSD reaches at least some students who are significantly distressed and who benefit from our services.

14 Brian Hansen ccc.byu.edu/cc (801)


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