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America’s History Sixth Edition CHAPTER 10 A Democratic Revolution, 1820-1844 Copyright © 2009 by Bedford/St. Martin’s and Matthew Ellington, Ruben S.

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Presentation on theme: "America’s History Sixth Edition CHAPTER 10 A Democratic Revolution, 1820-1844 Copyright © 2009 by Bedford/St. Martin’s and Matthew Ellington, Ruben S."— Presentation transcript:

1 America’s History Sixth Edition CHAPTER 10 A Democratic Revolution, Copyright © 2009 by Bedford/St. Martin’s and Matthew Ellington, Ruben S. Ayala High School Henretta Brody Dumenil

2 1.The Rise of Popular Politics, 1820–1829 A. The Decline of the Notables and the Rise of Parties B. The Election of 1824 C. The Last Notable President: John Quincy Adams D. “The Democracy” and the Election of The Jacksonian Presidency, 1829–1837 A. Jackson’s Agenda: Rotation and Decentralization B. The Tariff and Nullification C. The Bank War D. Indian Removal E. The Jacksonian Impact 3.Class, Culture, and the Second Party System A. The Whig Worldview B. Labor Politics and the Depression of 1837–1843 C. “Tippecanoe and Tyler Too!” Chapter 10: A Democratic Revolution,

3 Part 1: The Rise of Popular Politics, A: The Decline of the Notables & the Rise of Parties In the late 1700s, notables dominated local politics During the early 1800s states expanded voting rights to most white men and reapportioned their legislative districts by population State parties grew through the use of patronage, spoils, party discipline and political machines Thomas Nast portrayal of Jackson and the spoils system

4 Part 1: The Rise of Popular Politics, B: The Election of 1824 Refusal of candidates to accept the choice of the Republican caucus led to a five way presidential race The House was forced to decide since no one received a majority of the electoral votes Jacksonians charged that Adams won through a “corrupt bargain” with Henry Clay

5 Part 1: The Rise of Popular Politics, C: The Last Notable President: John Quincy Adams Adams strongly supported Clay’s American System of protective tariffs, federally subsidized roads and canals, and a strong national bank Adams’ support for the high tariff of 1828, fairness to the Indians, unwillingness to use patronage and “notable” style made him increasingly unpopular John Quincy Adams Andrew Jackson

6 Part 1: The Rise of Popular Politics, D: “The Democracy” and the Election of 1828 The Democrats ran first modern presidential campaign Democrats: coalition of northern farmers and artisans and southern slaveholders and some smallholders Jackson won in 1828 due to the expansion of voting and his hostility to the American System and Indians

7 Part 2: The Jacksonian Presidency, A: Jackson’s Agenda: Rotation & Decentralization Jackson used patronage and rotation in office to create a disciplined national political party Jackson’s vetoes killed the American System, BUS, and strengthened the Presidency Jackson fighting the Bank of US

8 Part 2: The Jacksonian Presidency, B: The Tariff and Nullification Anger over the high tariffs of 1828 and 1832 led S. Carolina to nullify both tariffs and threaten secession Congress passed the Force Bill and the Compromise Tariff of 1833 which ended the crisis Webster-Hayne Debate, 1830

9 Part 2: The Jacksonian Presidency, C: The Bank War Many Americans disliked the National Bank because it could close state banks, made loans more difficult, and seemed to favor the rich Clay’s failed attempt to force an early re-charter of the bank helped Jackson win reelection against him in 1832 Jackson began to place federal deposits in state “pet banks” to ensure the death of the 2 nd national bank

10 Part 2: The Jacksonian Presidency, D: Indian Removal Indian Removal Act of 1830 gave money and land in OK and KA to all Indians who gave up ancestral lands States and federal government ignored Supreme Court rulings and prior treaties, and took Indian lands 3,000 of 14,000 Cherokees forced to relocate 1200 miles away died on the “Trail of Tears”

11 Part 2: The Jacksonian Presidency, E: The Jacksonian Impact Jackson expanded the power of the Presidency while also limiting the government’s reach The Taney Court ( ) decisions endorsed states’ rights and free enterprise Many states also rewrote their constitutions to be more democratic and end the commonwealth system

12 Part 3: Class, Culture, and the Second Party System 3A: The Whig Worldview Whig Party appealed to the Northern middle class, evangelical Protestants, and some Southerners Whigs supported benevolent reforms and the American System and opposed the Masons Whigs lost election of 1836 but polled fairly well 1836 Political Cartoon predicting Van Buren’s defeat

13 Part 3: Class, Culture, and the Second Party System 3B: Labor Politics and the Depression of Panic of 1837 led to 20% unemployment, many bankruptcies and cost Democrats election of 1840 Van Buren signed 10 hour federal work day in 1840 Unions won recognition from the Supreme Court but were devastated by harsh tactics and the Panic of 1837

14 Part 3: Class, Culture, and the Second Party System 3C: “Tippecanoe and Tyler Too!” Jackson’s Specie Circular and Van Buren’s Independent Treasury worsened the depression Whigs “log cabin” campaign elected Harrison in 1840 Tyler fully assumed the presidency after Harrison’s death and his Democratic leanings split the Whigs


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